CDZ OK, I'll Try Again, How Can We Save Obamacare and Make it Actually Work for ALL of Us?

JimBowie1958

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OK, Trump could take the wind out of a lot of Democrat sails if whe would do two things:
1) Adopt this Personalized Health Care proposal; Personalized Healthcare - Healthcare for You

Putting patients in charge by removing barriers that separate them from their doctors.

  • We must remove unnecessary red tape that separates doctors and patients. Under Obamacare’s electronic health record (EHR) regulation, doctors are required to spend about half of their time on paperwork and data entry instead of patient care. Regulations like that have put a literal and figurative screen between doctors and patients.
  • Red tape and regulations are driving physicians out of private practice; we need more independent doctors, not fewer. 53 percent of doctors are now payroll physicians employed by hospitals. Those doctors are beholden to the hospital and not their patients.
  • The doctor-patient relationship is intimate and personal; no one knows better what kind of treatment a patient needs than that patient’s doctor.
Reform: Eliminate unnecessary government red tape that create hours of unnecessary paperwork and strangle the patient-doctor relationship.

Personal Health Management Accounts to give patients more control over their healthcare dollars.

  • Personal Health Management accounts allow patients to purchase insurance plans that are customized to their needs and portable—similar to life and auto insurance—so individuals can take it with them from job to job. This eliminates the fear of losing health insurance when you change jobs or move.
  • Employers can opt to contribute directly to these accounts, getting them out of the insurance business which puts healthcare decisions in the hands of their employees, not employers and their third-party administrators.
  • This allows employees to use pre-tax dollars to pay for healthcare and gives them the same tax benefits enjoyed by employers.
  • Allows patients to only pay for what they need, not a one size fits all government plan like Medicare For All.
Reform: Change current rules around Health Savings Accounts by a) increasing the maximum HSA contribution, b) allowing people to pay for insurance premiums from an HSA account so individuals have the same tax advantage currently enjoyed by corporate employees, c) repeal the requirement that exclusively links HSAs to certain high deductible plans and d) allow people to contribute to an HSA and use it to fund a Medical Cost Sharing plan or a Direct Medical Care arrangement.

Expanding Direct Medical Care to increase choices and lower costs.

  • Putting patients back in charge of their healthcare spending through expanded pre-tax accounts will vastly increase direct medical care, which cuts out middlemen to lower costs and gives patients more choice.
  • For family care needs, direct medical care is known as direct primary care, which offers families all their primary medical care needs for one low monthly membership fee – no insurance or middlemen necessary. Patients can get access to their regular doctors at any time through call, text, or telemedicine.
  • For other procedures – at surgery centers, for instance – direct medical care means transparent cash prices, which will allow patients to price shop, lowering prices.
  • Cash prices are often cheaper than what insurers can offer. According to Vanderbilt economist Larry Van Horn, cash healthcare prices are 40 percent lower than insurers’ negotiated rates.
  • Whether it’s a monthly membership fee for Direct Primary Care, posted pricing at a surgical center, or fee for service from a specialist, patients will be able to get healthcare at a lower price and have more choice.
Reform: Eliminate rules that restrict the use of direct medical care and encourage patients to take advantage of alternative avenues to receiving health services.

Lowering insurance premiums through increased choice and price transparency.

  • In every industry where we have more choice and price transparency, we see lower prices and more innovation; healthcare is not an exception to this economic fact.
  • End inefficient federal rules and requirements on private insurance plans and allow states to expand and regulate their private insurance markets to offer more choice and better options.
  • Let patients purchase plans that are customized to their needs like they do with auto and life insurance
  • Rather than another centralized federal experiment, we should remove federal regulations on this private market and let the state insurance departments and lawmakers tackle problems or concerns. What works best in New York may not work for Kansas. You should not be required to pay for features that you don’t want.
  • End federal restrictions on modern healthcare advances like telemedicine, which allows patients to access their physicians via text, email and SKYPE, decreasing time spent waiting in doctors’ offices to be seen for minor issues.
Reform: End rules that regulate what should be included in a healthcare plan, how you can access it and when you can keep it.

Lowering drug prices.

  • Return savings back to the patients instead of medicine middlemen; right now $250 billion per year goes to middlemen.
  • Nearly all the recent increases in drug list prices can be chalked up to rising rebates.
Reform: Repeal the legislation that exempts these middlemen from penalty for violating the federal anti-kickback law.

Protecting against pre-existing conditions.

  • Patients will be covered even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Allow employees to use Personal Health Management Accounts to buy their own health insurance which prevents any lapse in coverage when changing jobs. This change helps address some of the problems of pre-existing conditions.
Reform: Give states the autonomy to guarantee a health insurance policy that cannot raise people’s rates or drop them from coverage due to health conditions. Many states have these laws in place, but they are moot under the ACA. Others can amend their laws to include it, or they can set up risk pools.​

And ...
2) Reform MedicAID into a government run health insurance system that is pro-rated for income level and the premium based on national averages - 20%.

I think if you do that, most moderates thinking about a Democrat will jump over to Trump because we get national health care coverage for everyone, and keep our private insurance too.
 

progressive hunter

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OK, Trump could take the wind out of a lot of Democrat sails if whe would do two things:
1) Adopt this Personalized Health Care proposal; Personalized Healthcare - Healthcare for You

Putting patients in charge by removing barriers that separate them from their doctors.

  • We must remove unnecessary red tape that separates doctors and patients. Under Obamacare’s electronic health record (EHR) regulation, doctors are required to spend about half of their time on paperwork and data entry instead of patient care. Regulations like that have put a literal and figurative screen between doctors and patients.
  • Red tape and regulations are driving physicians out of private practice; we need more independent doctors, not fewer. 53 percent of doctors are now payroll physicians employed by hospitals. Those doctors are beholden to the hospital and not their patients.
  • The doctor-patient relationship is intimate and personal; no one knows better what kind of treatment a patient needs than that patient’s doctor.
Reform: Eliminate unnecessary government red tape that create hours of unnecessary paperwork and strangle the patient-doctor relationship.

Personal Health Management Accounts to give patients more control over their healthcare dollars.

  • Personal Health Management accounts allow patients to purchase insurance plans that are customized to their needs and portable—similar to life and auto insurance—so individuals can take it with them from job to job. This eliminates the fear of losing health insurance when you change jobs or move.
  • Employers can opt to contribute directly to these accounts, getting them out of the insurance business which puts healthcare decisions in the hands of their employees, not employers and their third-party administrators.
  • This allows employees to use pre-tax dollars to pay for healthcare and gives them the same tax benefits enjoyed by employers.
  • Allows patients to only pay for what they need, not a one size fits all government plan like Medicare For All.
Reform: Change current rules around Health Savings Accounts by a) increasing the maximum HSA contribution, b) allowing people to pay for insurance premiums from an HSA account so individuals have the same tax advantage currently enjoyed by corporate employees, c) repeal the requirement that exclusively links HSAs to certain high deductible plans and d) allow people to contribute to an HSA and use it to fund a Medical Cost Sharing plan or a Direct Medical Care arrangement.

Expanding Direct Medical Care to increase choices and lower costs.

  • Putting patients back in charge of their healthcare spending through expanded pre-tax accounts will vastly increase direct medical care, which cuts out middlemen to lower costs and gives patients more choice.
  • For family care needs, direct medical care is known as direct primary care, which offers families all their primary medical care needs for one low monthly membership fee – no insurance or middlemen necessary. Patients can get access to their regular doctors at any time through call, text, or telemedicine.
  • For other procedures – at surgery centers, for instance – direct medical care means transparent cash prices, which will allow patients to price shop, lowering prices.
  • Cash prices are often cheaper than what insurers can offer. According to Vanderbilt economist Larry Van Horn, cash healthcare prices are 40 percent lower than insurers’ negotiated rates.
  • Whether it’s a monthly membership fee for Direct Primary Care, posted pricing at a surgical center, or fee for service from a specialist, patients will be able to get healthcare at a lower price and have more choice.
Reform: Eliminate rules that restrict the use of direct medical care and encourage patients to take advantage of alternative avenues to receiving health services.

Lowering insurance premiums through increased choice and price transparency.

  • In every industry where we have more choice and price transparency, we see lower prices and more innovation; healthcare is not an exception to this economic fact.
  • End inefficient federal rules and requirements on private insurance plans and allow states to expand and regulate their private insurance markets to offer more choice and better options.
  • Let patients purchase plans that are customized to their needs like they do with auto and life insurance
  • Rather than another centralized federal experiment, we should remove federal regulations on this private market and let the state insurance departments and lawmakers tackle problems or concerns. What works best in New York may not work for Kansas. You should not be required to pay for features that you don’t want.
  • End federal restrictions on modern healthcare advances like telemedicine, which allows patients to access their physicians via text, email and SKYPE, decreasing time spent waiting in doctors’ offices to be seen for minor issues.
Reform: End rules that regulate what should be included in a healthcare plan, how you can access it and when you can keep it.

Lowering drug prices.

  • Return savings back to the patients instead of medicine middlemen; right now $250 billion per year goes to middlemen.
  • Nearly all the recent increases in drug list prices can be chalked up to rising rebates.
Reform: Repeal the legislation that exempts these middlemen from penalty for violating the federal anti-kickback law.

Protecting against pre-existing conditions.

  • Patients will be covered even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Allow employees to use Personal Health Management Accounts to buy their own health insurance which prevents any lapse in coverage when changing jobs. This change helps address some of the problems of pre-existing conditions.
Reform: Give states the autonomy to guarantee a health insurance policy that cannot raise people’s rates or drop them from coverage due to health conditions. Many states have these laws in place, but they are moot under the ACA. Others can amend their laws to include it, or they can set up risk pools.​

And ...
2) Reform MedicAID into a government run health insurance system that is pro-rated for income level and the premium based on national averages - 20%.

I think if you do that, most moderates thinking about a Democrat will jump over to Trump because we get national health care coverage for everyone, and keep our private insurance too.

its amazing how ignorant some people can be even though we have tons of history to prove socialism doesnt work,,,
 

Flash

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I think the much better plan would be for the government to get out of the business of regulating and subsidizing heath care.

I don't need a bureaucrat, whose boss is a politician elected by special interest groups, having a say in anything doing with my health care.

I'll pay for my heath care and you can pay for yours and we will leave the government out of it.
 

Third Party

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OK, Trump could take the wind out of a lot of Democrat sails if whe would do two things:
1) Adopt this Personalized Health Care proposal; Personalized Healthcare - Healthcare for You

Putting patients in charge by removing barriers that separate them from their doctors.

  • We must remove unnecessary red tape that separates doctors and patients. Under Obamacare’s electronic health record (EHR) regulation, doctors are required to spend about half of their time on paperwork and data entry instead of patient care. Regulations like that have put a literal and figurative screen between doctors and patients.
  • Red tape and regulations are driving physicians out of private practice; we need more independent doctors, not fewer. 53 percent of doctors are now payroll physicians employed by hospitals. Those doctors are beholden to the hospital and not their patients.
  • The doctor-patient relationship is intimate and personal; no one knows better what kind of treatment a patient needs than that patient’s doctor.
Reform: Eliminate unnecessary government red tape that create hours of unnecessary paperwork and strangle the patient-doctor relationship.

Personal Health Management Accounts to give patients more control over their healthcare dollars.

  • Personal Health Management accounts allow patients to purchase insurance plans that are customized to their needs and portable—similar to life and auto insurance—so individuals can take it with them from job to job. This eliminates the fear of losing health insurance when you change jobs or move.
  • Employers can opt to contribute directly to these accounts, getting them out of the insurance business which puts healthcare decisions in the hands of their employees, not employers and their third-party administrators.
  • This allows employees to use pre-tax dollars to pay for healthcare and gives them the same tax benefits enjoyed by employers.
  • Allows patients to only pay for what they need, not a one size fits all government plan like Medicare For All.
Reform: Change current rules around Health Savings Accounts by a) increasing the maximum HSA contribution, b) allowing people to pay for insurance premiums from an HSA account so individuals have the same tax advantage currently enjoyed by corporate employees, c) repeal the requirement that exclusively links HSAs to certain high deductible plans and d) allow people to contribute to an HSA and use it to fund a Medical Cost Sharing plan or a Direct Medical Care arrangement.

Expanding Direct Medical Care to increase choices and lower costs.

  • Putting patients back in charge of their healthcare spending through expanded pre-tax accounts will vastly increase direct medical care, which cuts out middlemen to lower costs and gives patients more choice.
  • For family care needs, direct medical care is known as direct primary care, which offers families all their primary medical care needs for one low monthly membership fee – no insurance or middlemen necessary. Patients can get access to their regular doctors at any time through call, text, or telemedicine.
  • For other procedures – at surgery centers, for instance – direct medical care means transparent cash prices, which will allow patients to price shop, lowering prices.
  • Cash prices are often cheaper than what insurers can offer. According to Vanderbilt economist Larry Van Horn, cash healthcare prices are 40 percent lower than insurers’ negotiated rates.
  • Whether it’s a monthly membership fee for Direct Primary Care, posted pricing at a surgical center, or fee for service from a specialist, patients will be able to get healthcare at a lower price and have more choice.
Reform: Eliminate rules that restrict the use of direct medical care and encourage patients to take advantage of alternative avenues to receiving health services.

Lowering insurance premiums through increased choice and price transparency.

  • In every industry where we have more choice and price transparency, we see lower prices and more innovation; healthcare is not an exception to this economic fact.
  • End inefficient federal rules and requirements on private insurance plans and allow states to expand and regulate their private insurance markets to offer more choice and better options.
  • Let patients purchase plans that are customized to their needs like they do with auto and life insurance
  • Rather than another centralized federal experiment, we should remove federal regulations on this private market and let the state insurance departments and lawmakers tackle problems or concerns. What works best in New York may not work for Kansas. You should not be required to pay for features that you don’t want.
  • End federal restrictions on modern healthcare advances like telemedicine, which allows patients to access their physicians via text, email and SKYPE, decreasing time spent waiting in doctors’ offices to be seen for minor issues.
Reform: End rules that regulate what should be included in a healthcare plan, how you can access it and when you can keep it.

Lowering drug prices.

  • Return savings back to the patients instead of medicine middlemen; right now $250 billion per year goes to middlemen.
  • Nearly all the recent increases in drug list prices can be chalked up to rising rebates.
Reform: Repeal the legislation that exempts these middlemen from penalty for violating the federal anti-kickback law.

Protecting against pre-existing conditions.

  • Patients will be covered even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Allow employees to use Personal Health Management Accounts to buy their own health insurance which prevents any lapse in coverage when changing jobs. This change helps address some of the problems of pre-existing conditions.
Reform: Give states the autonomy to guarantee a health insurance policy that cannot raise people’s rates or drop them from coverage due to health conditions. Many states have these laws in place, but they are moot under the ACA. Others can amend their laws to include it, or they can set up risk pools.​

And ...
2) Reform MedicAID into a government run health insurance system that is pro-rated for income level and the premium based on national averages - 20%.

I think if you do that, most moderates thinking about a Democrat will jump over to Trump because we get national health care coverage for everyone, and keep our private insurance too.
It strikes me that the supply and demand issue here is too many patients and not enough-not doctors-health practitioners.
 

Bob Blaylock

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OK, Trump could take the wind out of a lot of Democrat sails if whe would do two things:
1) Adopt this Personalized Health Care proposal; Personalized Healthcare - Healthcare for You

Putting patients in charge by removing barriers that separate them from their doctors.

  • We must remove unnecessary red tape that separates doctors and patients. Under Obamacare’s electronic health record (EHR) regulation, doctors are required to spend about half of their time on paperwork and data entry instead of patient care. Regulations like that have put a literal and figurative screen between doctors and patients.
  • Red tape and regulations are driving physicians out of private practice; we need more independent doctors, not fewer. 53 percent of doctors are now payroll physicians employed by hospitals. Those doctors are beholden to the hospital and not their patients.
  • The doctor-patient relationship is intimate and personal; no one knows better what kind of treatment a patient needs than that patient’s doctor.
Reform: Eliminate unnecessary government red tape that create hours of unnecessary paperwork and strangle the patient-doctor relationship.

Personal Health Management Accounts to give patients more control over their healthcare dollars.

  • Personal Health Management accounts allow patients to purchase insurance plans that are customized to their needs and portable—similar to life and auto insurance—so individuals can take it with them from job to job. This eliminates the fear of losing health insurance when you change jobs or move.
  • Employers can opt to contribute directly to these accounts, getting them out of the insurance business which puts healthcare decisions in the hands of their employees, not employers and their third-party administrators.
  • This allows employees to use pre-tax dollars to pay for healthcare and gives them the same tax benefits enjoyed by employers.
  • Allows patients to only pay for what they need, not a one size fits all government plan like Medicare For All.
Reform: Change current rules around Health Savings Accounts by a) increasing the maximum HSA contribution, b) allowing people to pay for insurance premiums from an HSA account so individuals have the same tax advantage currently enjoyed by corporate employees, c) repeal the requirement that exclusively links HSAs to certain high deductible plans and d) allow people to contribute to an HSA and use it to fund a Medical Cost Sharing plan or a Direct Medical Care arrangement.

Expanding Direct Medical Care to increase choices and lower costs.

  • Putting patients back in charge of their healthcare spending through expanded pre-tax accounts will vastly increase direct medical care, which cuts out middlemen to lower costs and gives patients more choice.
  • For family care needs, direct medical care is known as direct primary care, which offers families all their primary medical care needs for one low monthly membership fee – no insurance or middlemen necessary. Patients can get access to their regular doctors at any time through call, text, or telemedicine.
  • For other procedures – at surgery centers, for instance – direct medical care means transparent cash prices, which will allow patients to price shop, lowering prices.
  • Cash prices are often cheaper than what insurers can offer. According to Vanderbilt economist Larry Van Horn, cash healthcare prices are 40 percent lower than insurers’ negotiated rates.
  • Whether it’s a monthly membership fee for Direct Primary Care, posted pricing at a surgical center, or fee for service from a specialist, patients will be able to get healthcare at a lower price and have more choice.
Reform: Eliminate rules that restrict the use of direct medical care and encourage patients to take advantage of alternative avenues to receiving health services.

Lowering insurance premiums through increased choice and price transparency.

  • In every industry where we have more choice and price transparency, we see lower prices and more innovation; healthcare is not an exception to this economic fact.
  • End inefficient federal rules and requirements on private insurance plans and allow states to expand and regulate their private insurance markets to offer more choice and better options.
  • Let patients purchase plans that are customized to their needs like they do with auto and life insurance
  • Rather than another centralized federal experiment, we should remove federal regulations on this private market and let the state insurance departments and lawmakers tackle problems or concerns. What works best in New York may not work for Kansas. You should not be required to pay for features that you don’t want.
  • End federal restrictions on modern healthcare advances like telemedicine, which allows patients to access their physicians via text, email and SKYPE, decreasing time spent waiting in doctors’ offices to be seen for minor issues.
Reform: End rules that regulate what should be included in a healthcare plan, how you can access it and when you can keep it.

Lowering drug prices.

  • Return savings back to the patients instead of medicine middlemen; right now $250 billion per year goes to middlemen.
  • Nearly all the recent increases in drug list prices can be chalked up to rising rebates.
Reform: Repeal the legislation that exempts these middlemen from penalty for violating the federal anti-kickback law.

Protecting against pre-existing conditions.

  • Patients will be covered even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Allow employees to use Personal Health Management Accounts to buy their own health insurance which prevents any lapse in coverage when changing jobs. This change helps address some of the problems of pre-existing conditions.
Reform: Give states the autonomy to guarantee a health insurance policy that cannot raise people’s rates or drop them from coverage due to health conditions. Many states have these laws in place, but they are moot under the ACA. Others can amend their laws to include it, or they can set up risk pools.​

And ...
2) Reform MedicAID into a government run health insurance system that is pro-rated for income level and the premium based on national averages - 20%.

I think if you do that, most moderates thinking about a Democrat will jump over to Trump because we get national health care coverage for everyone, and keep our private insurance too.
You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

The ObamaCare scam is unworkable crap at its very deepest roots. There is no way to make it otherwise.

The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.
 

progressive hunter

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OK, Trump could take the wind out of a lot of Democrat sails if whe would do two things:
1) Adopt this Personalized Health Care proposal; Personalized Healthcare - Healthcare for You

Putting patients in charge by removing barriers that separate them from their doctors.

  • We must remove unnecessary red tape that separates doctors and patients. Under Obamacare’s electronic health record (EHR) regulation, doctors are required to spend about half of their time on paperwork and data entry instead of patient care. Regulations like that have put a literal and figurative screen between doctors and patients.
  • Red tape and regulations are driving physicians out of private practice; we need more independent doctors, not fewer. 53 percent of doctors are now payroll physicians employed by hospitals. Those doctors are beholden to the hospital and not their patients.
  • The doctor-patient relationship is intimate and personal; no one knows better what kind of treatment a patient needs than that patient’s doctor.
Reform: Eliminate unnecessary government red tape that create hours of unnecessary paperwork and strangle the patient-doctor relationship.

Personal Health Management Accounts to give patients more control over their healthcare dollars.

  • Personal Health Management accounts allow patients to purchase insurance plans that are customized to their needs and portable—similar to life and auto insurance—so individuals can take it with them from job to job. This eliminates the fear of losing health insurance when you change jobs or move.
  • Employers can opt to contribute directly to these accounts, getting them out of the insurance business which puts healthcare decisions in the hands of their employees, not employers and their third-party administrators.
  • This allows employees to use pre-tax dollars to pay for healthcare and gives them the same tax benefits enjoyed by employers.
  • Allows patients to only pay for what they need, not a one size fits all government plan like Medicare For All.
Reform: Change current rules around Health Savings Accounts by a) increasing the maximum HSA contribution, b) allowing people to pay for insurance premiums from an HSA account so individuals have the same tax advantage currently enjoyed by corporate employees, c) repeal the requirement that exclusively links HSAs to certain high deductible plans and d) allow people to contribute to an HSA and use it to fund a Medical Cost Sharing plan or a Direct Medical Care arrangement.

Expanding Direct Medical Care to increase choices and lower costs.

  • Putting patients back in charge of their healthcare spending through expanded pre-tax accounts will vastly increase direct medical care, which cuts out middlemen to lower costs and gives patients more choice.
  • For family care needs, direct medical care is known as direct primary care, which offers families all their primary medical care needs for one low monthly membership fee – no insurance or middlemen necessary. Patients can get access to their regular doctors at any time through call, text, or telemedicine.
  • For other procedures – at surgery centers, for instance – direct medical care means transparent cash prices, which will allow patients to price shop, lowering prices.
  • Cash prices are often cheaper than what insurers can offer. According to Vanderbilt economist Larry Van Horn, cash healthcare prices are 40 percent lower than insurers’ negotiated rates.
  • Whether it’s a monthly membership fee for Direct Primary Care, posted pricing at a surgical center, or fee for service from a specialist, patients will be able to get healthcare at a lower price and have more choice.
Reform: Eliminate rules that restrict the use of direct medical care and encourage patients to take advantage of alternative avenues to receiving health services.

Lowering insurance premiums through increased choice and price transparency.

  • In every industry where we have more choice and price transparency, we see lower prices and more innovation; healthcare is not an exception to this economic fact.
  • End inefficient federal rules and requirements on private insurance plans and allow states to expand and regulate their private insurance markets to offer more choice and better options.
  • Let patients purchase plans that are customized to their needs like they do with auto and life insurance
  • Rather than another centralized federal experiment, we should remove federal regulations on this private market and let the state insurance departments and lawmakers tackle problems or concerns. What works best in New York may not work for Kansas. You should not be required to pay for features that you don’t want.
  • End federal restrictions on modern healthcare advances like telemedicine, which allows patients to access their physicians via text, email and SKYPE, decreasing time spent waiting in doctors’ offices to be seen for minor issues.
Reform: End rules that regulate what should be included in a healthcare plan, how you can access it and when you can keep it.

Lowering drug prices.

  • Return savings back to the patients instead of medicine middlemen; right now $250 billion per year goes to middlemen.
  • Nearly all the recent increases in drug list prices can be chalked up to rising rebates.
Reform: Repeal the legislation that exempts these middlemen from penalty for violating the federal anti-kickback law.

Protecting against pre-existing conditions.

  • Patients will be covered even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Allow employees to use Personal Health Management Accounts to buy their own health insurance which prevents any lapse in coverage when changing jobs. This change helps address some of the problems of pre-existing conditions.
Reform: Give states the autonomy to guarantee a health insurance policy that cannot raise people’s rates or drop them from coverage due to health conditions. Many states have these laws in place, but they are moot under the ACA. Others can amend their laws to include it, or they can set up risk pools.​

And ...
2) Reform MedicAID into a government run health insurance system that is pro-rated for income level and the premium based on national averages - 20%.

I think if you do that, most moderates thinking about a Democrat will jump over to Trump because we get national health care coverage for everyone, and keep our private insurance too.
You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

The ObamaCare scam is unworkable crap at its very deepest roots. There is no way to make it otherwise.

The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.

starting over isnt an option,,,the only solution is to get the government out of healthcare like the constitution requires,,,
 

Olde Europe

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Insurance cabal promises.....

~S~
Yep, The Racket sees Medicare for All coming over the horizon, and dangles red herrings and buckets of snake oil before the noses of citizens. Couldn't be more transparent.
 

Oddball

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OK, Trump could take the wind out of a lot of Democrat sails if whe would do two things:
1) Adopt this Personalized Health Care proposal; Personalized Healthcare - Healthcare for You

Putting patients in charge by removing barriers that separate them from their doctors.

  • We must remove unnecessary red tape that separates doctors and patients. Under Obamacare’s electronic health record (EHR) regulation, doctors are required to spend about half of their time on paperwork and data entry instead of patient care. Regulations like that have put a literal and figurative screen between doctors and patients.
  • Red tape and regulations are driving physicians out of private practice; we need more independent doctors, not fewer. 53 percent of doctors are now payroll physicians employed by hospitals. Those doctors are beholden to the hospital and not their patients.
  • The doctor-patient relationship is intimate and personal; no one knows better what kind of treatment a patient needs than that patient’s doctor.
Reform: Eliminate unnecessary government red tape that create hours of unnecessary paperwork and strangle the patient-doctor relationship.

Personal Health Management Accounts to give patients more control over their healthcare dollars.

  • Personal Health Management accounts allow patients to purchase insurance plans that are customized to their needs and portable—similar to life and auto insurance—so individuals can take it with them from job to job. This eliminates the fear of losing health insurance when you change jobs or move.
  • Employers can opt to contribute directly to these accounts, getting them out of the insurance business which puts healthcare decisions in the hands of their employees, not employers and their third-party administrators.
  • This allows employees to use pre-tax dollars to pay for healthcare and gives them the same tax benefits enjoyed by employers.
  • Allows patients to only pay for what they need, not a one size fits all government plan like Medicare For All.
Reform: Change current rules around Health Savings Accounts by a) increasing the maximum HSA contribution, b) allowing people to pay for insurance premiums from an HSA account so individuals have the same tax advantage currently enjoyed by corporate employees, c) repeal the requirement that exclusively links HSAs to certain high deductible plans and d) allow people to contribute to an HSA and use it to fund a Medical Cost Sharing plan or a Direct Medical Care arrangement.

Expanding Direct Medical Care to increase choices and lower costs.

  • Putting patients back in charge of their healthcare spending through expanded pre-tax accounts will vastly increase direct medical care, which cuts out middlemen to lower costs and gives patients more choice.
  • For family care needs, direct medical care is known as direct primary care, which offers families all their primary medical care needs for one low monthly membership fee – no insurance or middlemen necessary. Patients can get access to their regular doctors at any time through call, text, or telemedicine.
  • For other procedures – at surgery centers, for instance – direct medical care means transparent cash prices, which will allow patients to price shop, lowering prices.
  • Cash prices are often cheaper than what insurers can offer. According to Vanderbilt economist Larry Van Horn, cash healthcare prices are 40 percent lower than insurers’ negotiated rates.
  • Whether it’s a monthly membership fee for Direct Primary Care, posted pricing at a surgical center, or fee for service from a specialist, patients will be able to get healthcare at a lower price and have more choice.
Reform: Eliminate rules that restrict the use of direct medical care and encourage patients to take advantage of alternative avenues to receiving health services.

Lowering insurance premiums through increased choice and price transparency.

  • In every industry where we have more choice and price transparency, we see lower prices and more innovation; healthcare is not an exception to this economic fact.
  • End inefficient federal rules and requirements on private insurance plans and allow states to expand and regulate their private insurance markets to offer more choice and better options.
  • Let patients purchase plans that are customized to their needs like they do with auto and life insurance
  • Rather than another centralized federal experiment, we should remove federal regulations on this private market and let the state insurance departments and lawmakers tackle problems or concerns. What works best in New York may not work for Kansas. You should not be required to pay for features that you don’t want.
  • End federal restrictions on modern healthcare advances like telemedicine, which allows patients to access their physicians via text, email and SKYPE, decreasing time spent waiting in doctors’ offices to be seen for minor issues.
Reform: End rules that regulate what should be included in a healthcare plan, how you can access it and when you can keep it.

Lowering drug prices.

  • Return savings back to the patients instead of medicine middlemen; right now $250 billion per year goes to middlemen.
  • Nearly all the recent increases in drug list prices can be chalked up to rising rebates.
Reform: Repeal the legislation that exempts these middlemen from penalty for violating the federal anti-kickback law.

Protecting against pre-existing conditions.

  • Patients will be covered even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Allow employees to use Personal Health Management Accounts to buy their own health insurance which prevents any lapse in coverage when changing jobs. This change helps address some of the problems of pre-existing conditions.
Reform: Give states the autonomy to guarantee a health insurance policy that cannot raise people’s rates or drop them from coverage due to health conditions. Many states have these laws in place, but they are moot under the ACA. Others can amend their laws to include it, or they can set up risk pools.​

And ...
2) Reform MedicAID into a government run health insurance system that is pro-rated for income level and the premium based on national averages - 20%.

I think if you do that, most moderates thinking about a Democrat will jump over to Trump because we get national health care coverage for everyone, and keep our private insurance too.
You can't polish a turd, dude.
 

dblack

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The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.
With what, though?
Well, we could start with what we had, because ACA is worse. Beyond that, the first thing I'd do is revoke the tax exempt status of employee "benefits" (employer provided health care). Then I'd remove any and all regulations and mandates propping up the current, dysfunctional, model of health insurance. Then wait for things to settle out. Hopefully, the benefits would be obvious before the nitwits regained power.
 

Fort Fun Indiana

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The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.
With what, though?
Well, we could start with what we had, because ACA is worse. Beyond that, the first thing I'd do is revoke the tax exempt status of employee "benefits" (employer provided health care). Then I'd remove any and all regulations and mandates propping up the current, dysfunctional, model of health insurance. Then wait for things to settle out. Hopefully, the benefits would be obvious before the nitwits regained power.
Well, those are all horrible ideas and would do nothing to curb spiraling coats or to help people afford them.

Anyone else?
 

dblack

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The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.
With what, though?
Well, we could start with what we had, because ACA is worse. Beyond that, the first thing I'd do is revoke the tax exempt status of employee "benefits" (employer provided health care). Then I'd remove any and all regulations and mandates propping up the current, dysfunctional, model of health insurance. Then wait for things to settle out. Hopefully, the benefits would be obvious before the nitwits regained power.
Well, those are all horrible ideas and would do nothing to curb spiraling coats or to help people afford them.

Anyone else?
On the contrary, these "horrible ideas" correct the distortions to the market currently caused by ill-considered state policy. But that would contradict your statist narrative, so it must be rejected at all costs!
 

Fort Fun Indiana

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The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.
With what, though?
Well, we could start with what we had, because ACA is worse. Beyond that, the first thing I'd do is revoke the tax exempt status of employee "benefits" (employer provided health care). Then I'd remove any and all regulations and mandates propping up the current, dysfunctional, model of health insurance. Then wait for things to settle out. Hopefully, the benefits would be obvious before the nitwits regained power.
Well, those are all horrible ideas and would do nothing to curb spiraling coats or to help people afford them.

Anyone else?
On the contrary, they correct the distortions to the market currently caused by ill-considered state policy. But that would contradict your statist narrative, so it must be rejected at all costs!
Delusional horseshit. Insurance costs have actually risen more slowly since the inception of the ACA. And medical firms are making record profits, and have been, for a long time. You clearly have no idea what you are talking about,and i am not interested in any more of your zero-hedge-plagiarized nonsense.

Anyone else?
 

dblack

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The only rational thing to do with it is to scrap it entirely, and start over.
With what, though?
Well, we could start with what we had, because ACA is worse. Beyond that, the first thing I'd do is revoke the tax exempt status of employee "benefits" (employer provided health care). Then I'd remove any and all regulations and mandates propping up the current, dysfunctional, model of health insurance. Then wait for things to settle out. Hopefully, the benefits would be obvious before the nitwits regained power.
Well, those are all horrible ideas and would do nothing to curb spiraling coats or to help people afford them.

Anyone else?
On the contrary, they correct the distortions to the market currently caused by ill-considered state policy. But that would contradict your statist narrative, so it must be rejected at all costs!
Delusional horseshit. Insurance costs have actually risen more slowly since the inception of the ACA. And medical firms are making record profits, and have been, for a long time. You clearly have no idea what you are talking about,and i am not interested in any more of your zero-hedge-plagiarized nonsense.

Anyone else?
 

Mac1958

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Opposing Authoritarian Ideological Fundamentalism.
The ACA is flabby crap, and we have to stop putting band aids on everything.

Expand the current and popular Medicare / Medicare Advantage / Medicare Supplement system to all, with some tweaks. An excellent blend of a public foundation and free market choice, competition & innovation, and individual/portable so that we take a massive cost monkey off the backs of American employers.

Sadly, this solution is too obvious and would require collaboration from both whacked-out sides, something of which we are no longer capable.
.
 
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JimBowie1958

JimBowie1958

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The ACA is flabby crap, and we have to stop putting band aids on everything.

Expand the current and popular Medicare / Medicare Advantage / Medicare Supplement system to all, with some tweaks. An excellent blend of a public foundation and free market choice, competition & innovation, and individual/portable so that we take a massive cost monkey off the backs of American employers.

Sadly, this solution is too obvious and would require collaboration from both whacked-out sides, something of which we are no longer capable.
.
All that would achieve is to destroy Medicare.

Why not reform MedicAID into a government run insurance and pro-rate the premiums based on income?
 

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