NASA: Fewer Large Asteroids Near Earth...

Missourian

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...than previously suspected, according to WISE imaging data, from 36,000 down to 20,000.


The condensed version (1.5 minutes):

[youtube]GFH2EXO_wrA[/youtube]



Full Briefing Video (35 minutes):


[youtube]m3NDbu5Y8c4[/youtube]


WISE on the web here: NASA - Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer









 

westwall

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Yep, unlike AGW an asteroid strike truly is a major concern. A strike wouldn't ruin your day, it could wipe out mankind. That's where our money should be going.
 

waltky

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Uncle Ferd says he still gonna wear his hard hat durin' dem meteor showers...

... `cause he don't wanna take a chance on gettin' bonked onna head.
:cool:
 

freedombecki

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Which is why we need a robust and involved space program. And probably the only reason to maintain a nuclear arsenal.

Great find. :clap:
We certainly do need a good space program, Mr. Sallow.
 

Sherry

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Did the universe close it's borders??:D
 

waltky

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That's about one every 40 seconds...
:cool:
Quadrantid meteor shower won't have to compete with moonlight
January 2, 2012 - Quadrantid meteor shower peak could hit as many as 100 meteors per hour, says NASA. The Quadrantid meteor shower will peak at 2 a.m. on Jan. 4.
The first meteor shower of 2012 — the lesser known Quadrantid meteor shower — will kick off a new year of skywatching when it peaks on Wednesday (Jan. 4). While many meteor displays in 2011 were washed out by a bright moon, the Quadrantid meteor shower is expected to put on a spectacular light show, with no pesky moonlight to interfere. The peak of the Quadrantids will occur at around 2 a.m. EST (0700 GMT) on Jan. 4. If you're planning to stay up late to catch the peak, you could be treated to meteors at a rate of 100 per hour, NASA officials said in a statement. Luckily, the waxing gibbous moon will set at around 3 a.m. local time, so as long as there are clear skies, conditions should be ripe for meteor watching into the pre-dawn hours. The sky map available here shower where to look to see the Quadrantid meteors.

Unlike the more well-known Perseid and Geminid meteor showers, the Quadrantids last only a few hours, so skywatchers have a narrower window of opportunity to spot them. Meteor showers occur when Earth travels through leftover debris from comets or asteroids. They are often known as "shooting stars," because of the way they streak across the sky. The Quadrantid meteors originate from an asteroid called 2003 EH1, and were first seen in 1825. According to some studies, this cosmic body could be a piece of a comet that broke apart several centuries ago, and the Quadrantids are the crumbled relics of debris from this fragmentation, NASA officials said. [12 Must-See Skywatching Events in 2012]

As Earth passes through, dust and debris will enter the planet's atmosphere a blistering speed of about 90,000 miles per hour (almost 145,000 kilometers per hour). These fragments will burn up about 50 miles (80 km) above Earth's surface, NASA officials said. Most meteor showers get their name based on the constellations from which they appear to streak. When we look at the so-called radiants, we are looking down the paths of the meteors that strike Earth's atmosphere. Because of the location of the radiant, at the northern tip of the constellation Bootes, only northern hemisphere skywatchers will be able to see Quadrantids.

The Quadrantids were named after the constellation of Quadrans Muralis, the wall quadrant, which is located between the constellations of Bootes and Draco. Quadrans Muralis was named by the French astronomer Jerome Lalande in 1795. The constellation represents an early astronomical instrument that was used to observe and plot stars. Interestingly, the constellation is no longer recognized by the astronomical community, but the name lives on with the January meteor shower. Editor's note: If you snap an amazing photo of the Quadrantid meteor shower would like to share it with SPACE.com, contact managing editor Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com.

Source
 

konradv

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Yep, unlike AGW an asteroid strike truly is a major concern. A strike wouldn't ruin your day, it could wipe out mankind. That's where our money should be going.
How is it a major concern considering the likelihood is so slim, as compared to the emission by humans of more CO2 in DAYS than all the volcanoes on earth do in a normal year? Your concern about where we should be putting our money reveals more about bias than actual danger. :eusa_wall:
 

westwall

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Yep, unlike AGW an asteroid strike truly is a major concern. A strike wouldn't ruin your day, it could wipe out mankind. That's where our money should be going.
How is it a major concern considering the likelihood is so slim, as compared to the emission by humans of more CO2 in DAYS than all the volcanoes on earth do in a normal year? Your concern about where we should be putting our money reveals more about bias than actual danger. :eusa_wall:





Who cares. Even when it was supremely hot during the PETM, life bloomed. All the major mammalian species we enjoy today evolved during that hot time. CO2 has been ten to twenty times higher in the past and the WORLD FUCKING bloomed. The most fantastic life forms the planet has ever seen wandered the Earth when it was 10 to 20 degrees warmer then now.

Corals evolved when the CO2 levels were 2000 ppm. You can't provide one iota of evidence that warmth kills. I can provide oodles of data that shows cold kills. And 65 million years ago an asteroid hit in the Yucatan and nearly ended everything. Just a month or so ago an asteroid passed between the Earth and the Moon the size of an aircraft carrier. Had it impacted us that would have been the end of civilisation period. No question, it's fucking over. And you sniveling brats piss and moan over a gas essential to life on this planet.

Grow the fuck up!
 

Old Rocks

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Well Walleyes, care to demonstrate again how stupid you truly are?

Great extinctions have been caused both by cold, impact, rise of the Alleghenies and depletion of the CO2 in the atmosphere, snowball earth, and heat from a rapid increase in GHGs in the atmosphere. It is not the cold or the heat that kill as much as a very rapid change. No time for organisms to adapt.

And that is where we are at today. Facing a very rapid rise in the global temperature with a human population of 7 billion. Already we see the effects of the changing climate.

http://media.swissre.com/documents/rethinking_shaping_climate_resilent_development_en.pdf

According to this Swiss Re report the number of natural catastrophes by the year;

1972 36
1976 45
1980 43
1984 49
1988 89
1992 121
1996 130
2000 130
2004 119
2008 137

The costs of weather related damage for those years has risen from 2 billion in 1972 to 45 billion in 2008.

You can find the figures on page 21 of the report.
 

Old Rocks

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Large asteroid strikes are seperated by hundreds of thousands of years. So the chances of having a strike in the coming century is extremely small.

The climate change driven by AGW is here and now. And a dead certainty to get worse in the near future.
 

westwall

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Well Walleyes, care to demonstrate again how stupid you truly are?

Great extinctions have been caused both by cold, impact, rise of the Alleghenies and depletion of the CO2 in the atmosphere, snowball earth, and heat from a rapid increase in GHGs in the atmosphere. It is not the cold or the heat that kill as much as a very rapid change. No time for organisms to adapt.

And that is where we are at today. Facing a very rapid rise in the global temperature with a human population of 7 billion. Already we see the effects of the changing climate.

http://media.swissre.com/documents/rethinking_shaping_climate_resilent_development_en.pdf

According to this Swiss Re report the number of natural catastrophes by the year;

1972 36
1976 45
1980 43
1984 49
1988 89
1992 121
1996 130
2000 130
2004 119
2008 137

The costs of weather related damage for those years has risen from 2 billion in 1972 to 45 billion in 2008.

You can find the figures on page 21 of the report.



Show us a single mass extinction caused by warmth. There is no compelling evidence for that in any of the mass extinctions that have occured as I showed you over a year ago. Cold is the one climatic condition that has been proven to be a consistent killer.

The scenarios that the warmists come up with for warm related mass extinctions are comical. You constantly love to harp about the PETM and yet that was a wonderful time for mammals. It wasn't so great for a few species of benthic forams but terrestrial life did phenominally well. Even your precious wiki acknowledges that.

Who cares about the cost of the damage. Care to calculate in the result of inflation? Hmmmm? OOOOpppps, looks like the destruction in the 1930s was just as bad when inflation is taken into account. You and your fellow travellers are such one dimensional thinkers it is sad. Try thinking critically about this one time in your life. Just once.
 
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westwall

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Large asteroid strikes are seperated by hundreds of thousands of years. So the chances of having a strike in the coming century is extremely small.

The climate change driven by AGW is here and now. And a dead certainty to get worse in the near future.




Extremely small and yet when they happen it's game over. We are the first species on this planet (that we know of) who have the ability to prevent that from happening. We've had three near misses that we know of. This last one, one that happened in the 1970's and Tunguska.

There may be only one bullet in the cylinder of your revolver...but how many spins do you get before you shoot yourself?

ANY climate problem can be dealt with. Any of them. Well, cold will be a stone cold bitch.
Millions will die if we enter into another LIA. Possibly billions. But anything else is a blip.
Not so a asteroid strike.
 

Mr. H.

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A far cheaper, yet much more effective approach...

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZfsnA7dAHI]Asteroids (Atari 1979) - YouTube[/ame]
 

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