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Mata Zetas, is Vigilante Justice Justified?

Xchel

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Mexico's Drug War: Who are the "Mata Zetas"?

"Inside an abandoned truck in a residential neighborhood in Cancun, Quintana Roo State, were found the bodies of three men, handcuffed and with plastic bags on their heads. Together with the remains was a note with the message: 'We are the new group Mata Zetas and we are against kidnapping and extortion, and we will fight them in all states for a cleaner Mexico.'" Link to El Universal Article

In the US we are taught that this kind of thing is repulsive and wrong, but with Mexican police being impotent against the violence in Mexico I will have to say that as long as this new group keeps their activities limited to Zetas and other assasins I say let them go and do their work that the police aren't doing...let them out the corrupt police and turn those corrupt police over to authorities that will prosecute them.

Who is behind the Mata Zetas? Are the cartels that are opposition to Zetas behind it? Businesses tired of the extortion and murders like the casinos behind it? or is the Mexican government and private citizens behind the arming of this group of vigilantes?
 
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LilOlLady

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'Zeta Killers' claim to be after Mexican drug cartel
Sep 28, 2011

(CNN) - A new paramilitary group calling themselves the Zeta Killers and claiming to be protecting citizens from Mexican drug cartels has appeared in an online video. del

Five burly men dressed in black and wearing masks say they have one goal in mind: to kill drug traffickers, or more specifically, members of the Mexican drug cartel known as "los zetas."
'Zeta Killers' claim to be after Mexican drug cartel - KCTV 5


:clap2::clap2::clap2:

merged
 

LilOlLady

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MEXICO:
Officials warn 'Zeta killers' against vigilante violence
September 27, 2011

REPORTING FROM MEXICO CITY — Mexican authorities say they are investigating a group that announced a campaign to wipe out the feared Zetas gang in the coastal state of Veracruz.

In a statement issued late Monday, the federal attorney general’s office warned that it would crack down on “any criminal group or organization that acts outside the law and creates violence.”

The agency said the battle against organized crime belongs to Mexican authorities alone. “The only way to achieve lasting security and tranquility is by enforcing the law and strengthening our institutions,” it said.

MEXICO: Officials warn 'Zeta killers' against vigilante violence - latimes.com

Sound like a bunch of anti-enforcement-pro-usa-illegal immigration advocates. Obama and Company.
 
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waltky

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Uncle Ferd says we need to use a counter-terrorism approach an' kill `em all...
:cool:
Counterinsurgency is not the answer for Mexican drug cartels
September 27, 2011 - Mexican drug cartels are not an insurgency, argues guest blogger Patrick Corcoran, and thus a US counterinsurgency campaign in Mexico probably wouldn't solve the country's crime problems.
Some in Washington are calling for a counterinsurgency strategy against Mexico's drug gangs – this not only misrepresents the security situation in that country, but its proponents have provided no good arguments for the move. The most prominent recent advocate of counterinsurgency, or COIN, is US Rep. Connie Mack (R) of Florida, who used a Congressional hearing earlier this month to call for a revamped Merida Initiative that would be based on COIN, and presumably include a far larger role for the American military. Some analysts outside the government have made similar pronouncements, while Secretary of State Hillary Clinton famously referred to an "insurgency," comparing Mexico to Colombia at the height of its conflict with guerrilla groups.

But these voices are mistaken. One clue that COIN is not the appropriate philosophy for Mexico is that the nation is not suffering from an insurgency. Insurgencies are political movements that seek to extract concessions from the government, or the government’s downfall, through violence. The Mexican gangs are motivated by profit, and have no visible ideological agenda. Their only political goal is weaker law enforcement. A counter to this assertion could be offered by gangs like the Familia Michoacana and its offshoot, the Caballeros Templarios, as well as some traffickers' use of pseudo-religious icons like Jesus Malverde (a Robin Hood-like figure) and Santa Muerte (Holy Death). In an era where the best known insurgencies have been led by Islamic extremists, it does not require a great deal imagination to conceive of a religiously motivated drug gang morphing into an insurgency.

But imagination notwithstanding, there’s simply zero evidence of such a scenario. Mexican groups’ religious patina is just that, not a guiding philosophy. While gang members use religious icons as a sort of good-luck charm, nothing that has happened over the past five years suggests that Santa Muerte or any other religious figure has an appreciable role in any gang’s operations. It’s also worth noting that hearts and minds, famously the battleground of insurgencies, are not in play in Mexico. While President Felipe Calderon’s popularity has declined in recent years, the citizens he represents overwhelmingly favor the government in its aggressive combat of organized crime. The proportion of Mexicans who support the use of the army against organized crime is somewhere between between 74 and 83 percent, depending on which poll you use – this serves as a good proxy for support for the government, given the prominence of the issue. Eighty-eight percent of the respondents to a September 2010 poll by the firm BGC expressed support for aggressive combat of the nation’s drug traffickers.

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editec

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Highly recommended especially since your military meatheads and Nazi cops wont defend your constitution.


Living well is still the best revenge in most cases.
 

Katzndogz

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mexico is in a state of civil war. What passes for "authority" is less than impotent. It is COMPLICIT in many cases. This isn't vigilate justice, it is the ONLY justice. It is entirely inappropriate for the government to oppose this group. There is only one reason for the government to do so, too many officials are on the side of one cartel or other. mexico is being given an opportunity in this civil war. It is a time of choosing up sides. For everyone. The cartels are occupying mexico as if it were a hostile army. Those who fight them aren't vigilantes, if they are anything they are resistence fighters.

This is so much like the Nazi occupation of France, that I'm surprised that no one has yet done a study about it to draw the correct comparisons and put it in perspective. The government of mexico as presently constituted is nothing more than a Vichy government filled with collaborators.
 

martybegan

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Vigilatism is the last resort when the appointed authorities are powerless to resist whatever lawlessness is going on.

The problem is it is often easier for the government to quash the vigilanties, and thus appear to be doing something, then to deal with the actual criminal element. The reason being is often (but no always) the vigilanties are far less ruthless than the criminals they rise up to oppose.
 

whitehall

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You can't judge foreign governments by US standards. All kinds of freedoms we take for granted in our 250 year old Constitution are not guaranteed the same way in the rest of the world.
 
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Xchel

Xchel

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mexico is in a state of civil war. What passes for "authority" is less than impotent. It is COMPLICIT in many cases. This isn't vigilate justice, it is the ONLY justice. It is entirely inappropriate for the government to oppose this group. There is only one reason for the government to do so, too many officials are on the side of one cartel or other. mexico is being given an opportunity in this civil war. It is a time of choosing up sides. For everyone. The cartels are occupying mexico as if it were a hostile army. Those who fight them aren't vigilantes, if they are anything they are resistence fighters.

This is so much like the Nazi occupation of France, that I'm surprised that no one has yet done a study about it to draw the correct comparisons and put it in perspective. The government of mexico as presently constituted is nothing more than a Vichy government filled with collaborators.

I think I can somewhat sympathize with this except that it has the tendency to sometimes spiral out of control. The Mara Salvatrucha or MS 13 also started as a group meant to protect Salvadoran refugees in Los Angeles and look how badly that turned out....I agree that Mexico is in somewhat of a civil war that we created by the war on drugs. I agree to a point they have no choice but to fight back, but I also understand the government saying that it is wrong..our government would say the same thing..vigilante justice is wrong..but what else are they to do? How many people have been murdered by these thugs? My son's cousin was kidnapped by what we assume is a cartel, we have heard nothing about him since Monday...I don't sympathize with the cartel...we don't even understand why they would take him in the first place as he wasn't involved in that activity at all..he sold clothing downtown here...and he was not well to do..the only thing we can think is he refused to pay an extortion tax...
 

Katzndogz

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mexico is in a state of civil war. What passes for "authority" is less than impotent. It is COMPLICIT in many cases. This isn't vigilate justice, it is the ONLY justice. It is entirely inappropriate for the government to oppose this group. There is only one reason for the government to do so, too many officials are on the side of one cartel or other. mexico is being given an opportunity in this civil war. It is a time of choosing up sides. For everyone. The cartels are occupying mexico as if it were a hostile army. Those who fight them aren't vigilantes, if they are anything they are resistence fighters.

This is so much like the Nazi occupation of France, that I'm surprised that no one has yet done a study about it to draw the correct comparisons and put it in perspective. The government of mexico as presently constituted is nothing more than a Vichy government filled with collaborators.

I think I can somewhat sympathize with this except that it has the tendency to sometimes spiral out of control. The Mara Salvatrucha or MS 13 also started as a group meant to protect Salvadoran refugees in Los Angeles and look how badly that turned out....I agree that Mexico is in somewhat of a civil war that we created by the war on drugs. I agree to a point they have no choice but to fight back, but I also understand the government saying that it is wrong..our government would say the same thing..vigilante justice is wrong..but what else are they to do? How many people have been murdered by these thugs? My son's cousin was kidnapped by what we assume is a cartel, we have heard nothing about him since Monday...I don't sympathize with the cartel...we don't even understand why they would take him in the first place as he wasn't involved in that activity at all..he sold clothing downtown here...and he was not well to do..the only thing we can think is he refused to pay an extortion tax...

I certainly sympathize with the kidnapping of your son's cousin. Right now, I believe that more than 40,000 people have been killed by the cartels, their sympathizers and supporters. It has gone beyond some war on drugs. There is extortion, human slavery, killing people for their fat. The government isn't wrong, it is non existent. Half the government officials are working directly for one cartel or other. Prison guards are bribed to let out prisoners who act as hit squads. It is long past time the people started fighting back, not only against the cartels, but against the corrupt government supporting them. Just like the American people need to develop vigilante squads to clean out the nests of vermin that infest this country before it gets that bad here.
 
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Xchel

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The problem with that is in the US there is actual justice when a person is caught committing a crime ...in Mexico and Central America that is not necesarily true. My son's cousin was taken forcefully from his home Monday by three men that were wearing ski masks, bullet proof vests and dressed like federal Honduran police...but they weren't police. Are we certain it is cartel? yes, who else would have that kind of sophistication? He never even tried drugs, but he did refuse to pay their war tax several times and they threatened him 15 days ago..he is leaving kids and a wife behind and as the hours pass we are more just wanting them to give his body back...but that may not even happen..so yeah I sympathize with the mata Zetas...I really do, but it still conflicts me greatly...because I also don't believe in vigilante justice.
 

Katzndogz

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Your cousin was not taken as any consequence of a drug war, but a real war. I don't think you have internalized that. Not what's really happening. When a criminal organization is able to exact a "tax" it is acting as the government. It has replaced the government. I saw this coming years ago. Why ever would the cartels stop at drug profits when it could be the government itself, the taxing authority whenever it wished! It only make sense that it would grow in that direction. Then it doesn't even need drug profits.

It isn't vigilante justice. It's the only justice you are going to get. The mexican government has failed, internally the individual government officials have already chosen up sides as to which cartel they support. If you can find a "vigilante" willing to fight for the people, it would be wise to support them.
 
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Xchel

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Your cousin was not taken as any consequence of a drug war, but a real war. I don't think you have internalized that. Not what's really happening. When a criminal organization is able to exact a "tax" it is acting as the government. It has replaced the government. I saw this coming years ago. Why ever would the cartels stop at drug profits when it could be the government itself, the taxing authority whenever it wished! It only make sense that it would grow in that direction. Then it doesn't even need drug profits.

It isn't vigilante justice. It's the only justice you are going to get. The mexican government has failed, internally the individual government officials have already chosen up sides as to which cartel they support. If you can find a "vigilante" willing to fight for the people, it would be wise to support them.

well I don't live in Mexico. I live in Honduras. There is nothing but a drug war here. We have violence going on but we don't have soldiers in the streets shooting at each other...so there is no real war per se. What we do have to deal with is tangles between cartel and DEA and the military police here...the local police rarely get involved in these struggles as they are not legally permitted to do this...the problem isn't the police so much here..it is the judges that let them go for a payment.

The story of my nephew is in La Tribuna our local paper but I also blogged about it so I will provide both links for you. Our local paper is in Spanish obviously so I provide my blog to you as well so that you can read it in English.
If you can read in Spanish you will get the jist of the story that this young man was an honest hard working individual that was just trying to make a living for his family...not involved with these fools at all..yet they still took him.
Life as an Ex Pat in Honduras: My Cousin Has Been Kidnapped

Agentes con chapa de la DNIC se llevaron comerciante desaparecido - LaTribuna.hn
 
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Xchel

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The problem with that is in the US there is actual justice when a person is caught committing a crime ....
Because of white people

no not because of white people tank...because all americans in general believe in justice being merited out fairly....your paper constitution would mean diddly if you were facing what we face every day of our lives here...
 
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Xchel

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Oh good lord state laws on immigration are ILLEGAL because they violate federal supremacy laws...see you forget that you are jumping the gun again...the US Court of Appeals and the US Supreme Court.
 

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