Jesus Wasn't the Only Man to Be Crucified. Here's the History Behind This Brutal Practice.

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The most famous crucifixion in the world took place when, according to the New Testament, Jesus was put to death by the Romans. But he was far from the only person who perished on the cross.

In antiquity, thousands upon thousands of people were crucified, which at the time was considered to be one of the most brutal and shameful ways to die. In Rome, the crucifixion process was a long one, entailing scourging (more on that later) before the victim was nailed and hung from the cross.
How did this terrible death sentence begin? And what types of people were usually crucified? Here's a look at the history of this savage practice.

 
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^ Crucifixion most likely began with the Assyrians and Babylonians, and it was also practiced systematically by the by the Persians in the sixth century B.C., according to a 2003 report in the South African Medical Journal (SAMJ). At this time, the victims were usually tied, feet dangling, to a tree or post; crosses weren't used until Roman times, according to the report.

From there, Alexander the Great, who invaded Persia as he built his empire, brought the practice to eastern Mediterranean countries in the fourth century B.C. But Roman officials weren't aware of the practice until they encountered it while fighting Carthage during the Punic Wars in the third century B.C.

For the next 500 years, the Romans "perfected crucifixion" until Constantine I abolished it in the fourth century A.D., co-authors Francois Retief and Louise Cilliers, professors in the Department of English and Classical Culture at the University of the Free State in South Africa, wrote in the SAMJ report.
 

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crosses weren't used until Roman times, according to the report.
To be fair, a cross is a fairly sophisticated piece of carpentry, a tight fitting cross lap joint, iron nails and animal glue (to be strong enough to support the weight of a struggling man.

Although the Egyptians had this technology as early as 1500 CE, it is doubtful they would have used leading edge woodworking on an execution device when so many more simple methods were available.
 

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The most famous crucifixion in the world took place when, according to the New Testament, Jesus was put to death by the Romans. But he was far from the only person who perished on the cross.

In antiquity, thousands upon thousands of people were crucified, which at the time was considered to be one of the most brutal and shameful ways to die. In Rome, the crucifixion process was a long one, entailing scourging (more on that later) before the victim was nailed and hung from the cross.
How did this terrible death sentence begin? And what types of people were usually crucified? Here's a look at the history of this savage practice.

The cross was the chosen means of execution by Ronan’s. There were hundreds of people who called themselves “messiah”. All were killed for trying to get the romans out of Jerusalem. And that doesn’t include the other types of criminals.
 

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crosses weren't used until Roman times, according to the report.
To be fair, a cross is a fairly sophisticated piece of carpentry, a tight fitting cross lap joint, iron nails and animal glue (to be strong enough to support the weight of a struggling man.

Although the Egyptians had this technology as early as 1500 CE, it is doubtful they would have used leading edge woodworking on an execution device when so many more simple methods were available.
Crucifixion is a variant of death by exposure, basically tying someone to a tree and leaving them for the scavengers. The cave men probably did it. I've also heard it suggested that Crucifixion in Jesus' day was actually done with both wrists nailed to a single post and the feet nailed through the heels on the sides of the post.
 
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crosses weren't used until Roman times, according to the report.
To be fair, a cross is a fairly sophisticated piece of carpentry, a tight fitting cross lap joint, iron nails and animal glue (to be strong enough to support the weight of a struggling man.

Although the Egyptians had this technology as early as 1500 CE, it is doubtful they would have used leading edge woodworking on an execution device when so many more simple methods were available.
This too, from that piece:

In antiquity, thousands upon thousands of people were crucified, which at the time was considered to be one of the “most brutal and shameful ways to die”.
 

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I think you forgot the most important one. . . Odin hanging himself from Yggdrasil (the tree of life) to give the Norse the wisdom of the Elder Futhark. (symbols of prophecy and wisdom, i.e. symbolic language.)


Odin's Self-sacrifice" (1908) by W. G. Collingwood. Image via Wikipedia


“…I know that I hung on a windy tree nine long nights, wounded with a spear, dedicated to Odin, myself to myself, on that tree of which no man knows from where its roots run.

No bread did they give me nor a drink from a horn, downwards I peered; I took up the runes, screaming I took them, then I fell back from there..."

Thus, in his never-ending search for wisdom and knowledge, Odin once again, paid the highest price as possible. He learned nine magic songs and eighteen highly powerful charms; with spells he could heal emotional and physical wounds. The magic he learned made it possible for him to bind and defeat his enemies, making their weapons totally useless.

Armed with the knowledge of the many mysteries of the runes and their enormous power, Odin composed the following verse:

“….Then I was fertilized and became wise; I truly grew and thrived. From a word to a word I was led to a word, From a work to a work I was led to a work…” (as cited by Roy Jackson, in “Viking: Viking Mythology: Ancient Myths, Gods and Warriors), who adds that the source of this poem is believed to be an Old Norse Poem, once part of the “Poetic Edda”.



Our day "Wednesday," is named after Odin. It is Wōdnesdæg.
 

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According to Seneca, crucifixion was a long, unremitting affair in which the victim would be “wasting away in pain, dying limb by limb, letting out his life drop by drop . . . fastened to the accursed tree, long sickly, already deformed, swelling with ugly tumors on chest and shoulders, and drawing the breath of life amid long-drawn-out agony.”
 

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The most famous crucifixion in the world took place when, according to the New Testament, Jesus was put to death by the Romans. But he was far from the only person who perished on the cross.
Never seen Kubrick's 1960 classic Sparticus?
 
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The most famous crucifixion in the world took place when, according to the New Testament, Jesus was put to death by the Romans. But he was far from the only person who perished on the cross.
Never seen Kubrick's 1960 classic Sparticus?
Yes, that came to mind.
 

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