"I like your Christ. I do not like your Christians. They are so unlike your Christ."

Avatar4321

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This quote has bothered me for a while. We have here Gandhi, who started a movement to free idea based on loving his fellow man saying he doesn't like a specific group of people, namely Christians.

Yet, if this quote is true, he spend a lot of time associating with Christians. He spent alot of time loving this group that he supposedly didn't like. It seems odd to me.

Another odd thing, no matter how much I search, there seems to be no source for the quote. Which, of course, leads me to believe that it's likely not an accurate quote.

However, despite my indepth study of Gandhi, I am not an expert. So I contacted an expert earlier. And oddly enough they have never found a source for that quote either.

Now is it moral to continue to attribute a quote to a man when no source can be provided and that man's teachings and actions seem to contradict the point of the quote.

As for the substance of the quote, no Christian does live the Gospel. If he did, we wouldn't need the Atonement of Christ.
 

syrenn

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Another odd thing, no matter how much I search, there seems to be no source for the quote. Which, of course, leads me to believe that it's likely not an accurate quote.

And what do you think the entirety of the bible is? It is something that was written many many years later.

All quotes without substance. What was "believed" to have been said and or meant.


just saying.
 

C_Clayton_Jones

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This quote has bothered me for a while. We have here Gandhi, who started a movement to free idea based on loving his fellow man saying he doesn't like a specific group of people, namely Christians.

Yet, if this quote is true, he spend a lot of time associating with Christians. He spent alot of time loving this group that he supposedly didn't like. It seems odd to me.

Another odd thing, no matter how much I search, there seems to be no source for the quote. Which, of course, leads me to believe that it's likely not an accurate quote.

However, despite my indepth study of Gandhi, I am not an expert. So I contacted an expert earlier. And oddly enough they have never found a source for that quote either.

Now is it moral to continue to attribute a quote to a man when no source can be provided and that man's teachings and actions seem to contradict the point of the quote.

As for the substance of the quote, no Christian does live the Gospel. If he did, we wouldn't need the Atonement of Christ.
Whether Gandhi said it or not is irrelevant, and you clearly miss the cogent point of the quote.

It has nothing to do with the ‘Atonement of Christ’ nor the intrinsic nature of sin with regard to the Christian, it goes to the fact that a significant number of Christians fail to make the effort to live the life of Christ, in their advocacy of war, unjust economic policies, and lack of tolerance of other faiths, and those free from faith in particular.
 

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Gandhi's point is that very few Christians are "Christ-like".
 

MeBelle

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This quote has bothered me for a while. We have here Gandhi, who started a movement to free idea based on loving his fellow man saying he doesn't like a specific group of people, namely Christians.
What I have wondered about this quote is, when did Ghandi meet Christ?
 

editec

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This quote has bothered me for a while. We have here Gandhi, who started a movement to free idea based on loving his fellow man saying he doesn't like a specific group of people, namely Christians.

Yet, if this quote is true, he spend a lot of time associating with Christians. He spent alot of time loving this group that he supposedly didn't like. It seems odd to me.

Another odd thing, no matter how much I search, there seems to be no source for the quote. Which, of course, leads me to believe that it's likely not an accurate quote.

However, despite my indepth study of Gandhi, I am not an expert. So I contacted an expert earlier. And oddly enough they have never found a source for that quote either.

Now is it moral to continue to attribute a quote to a man when no source can be provided and that man's teachings and actions seem to contradict the point of the quote.

As for the substance of the quote, no Christian does live the Gospel. If he did, we wouldn't need the Atonement of Christ.
I do not know if the quote is accurate.

But the sentiment of it rings true to me.

Very few Christians impress me as living lives even remotely Christ-like.

Certainly I don't.
 
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Gandhi's point is that very few Christians are "Christ-like".
There is no direct source for the quote so, in fact, we do not know whether Gandhi actually said it or not. So how on earth could he have a 'point'.

I like the old reliable 'Judge not, lest you be judged'.... you should try that. You judge people very quickly, and usually very harshly... and often, wrongly.
 

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Reporter: “Mr. Gandhi, what do you think of Western civilization?”
Gandhi: “I think it would be a good idea!”
 

Big Black Dog

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I had a sunday school teacher one time that was pretty hot...
 

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This quote has bothered me for a while. We have here Gandhi, who started a movement to free idea based on loving his fellow man saying he doesn't like a specific group of people, namely Christians.

Yet, if this quote is true, he spend a lot of time associating with Christians. He spent alot of time loving this group that he supposedly didn't like. It seems odd to me.

Another odd thing, no matter how much I search, there seems to be no source for the quote. Which, of course, leads me to believe that it's likely not an accurate quote.

However, despite my indepth study of Gandhi, I am not an expert. So I contacted an expert earlier. And oddly enough they have never found a source for that quote either.

Now is it moral to continue to attribute a quote to a man when no source can be provided and that man's teachings and actions seem to contradict the point of the quote.

As for the substance of the quote, no Christian does live the Gospel. If he did, we wouldn't need the Atonement of Christ.

When I heard that quote I was thinking, yeah. well Gandhi must not have liked Christ that much; if he did, one would think he'd quit accusing the brethren, and "like' them too, lol. If he liked Christ, then wouldn't he'd have known that His Word says we are all sinners and need the Lord and His love and learn to love from Him?

I dunno, I think Gandhi did some wonderful things and perhaps had a gift of charity or something? However, the love and grace portions of Jesus's Message - he may have missed out on? God only knows. However, we are constantly learning though - love covers a multitude of sins.

1 Peter 4:8
And above all things have fervent love for one another, for “love will cover a multitude of sins.”
Even if Gandhi said this...perhaps in a sense he was being like a pharisee? He seemed to be looking down his nose at others.... perhaps..."Look, behold..look what "good" I do, whilst these dirty rotten so called Christians are rotten scoundrals.", ??? lol.

Luke 18
9 Also He spoke this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others:
10 “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector.
11 The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, ‘God, I thank You that I am not like other men—extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this tax collector.
12 I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I possess.’
13 And the tax collector, standing afar off, would not so much as raise his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me a sinner!’
14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.”

Hey well, it's all good. Satan and his followers (whether it be known to them or not) are ultimately gone in the end. Woohoooooooo!! Though the brethren will be attacked again and again by them while we are here on earth, just as His Word says. Praise Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior, our King of kings - through Him alone we overcome.


Revelation 12
10And I heard a loud voice saying in heaven, Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of his Christ: for the accuser of our brethren is cast down, which accused them before our God day and night.

11And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and by the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death.

.
 
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Avatar4321

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Whether Gandhi said it or not is irrelevant, and you clearly miss the cogent point of the quote.

It has nothing to do with the ‘Atonement of Christ’ nor the intrinsic nature of sin with regard to the Christian, it goes to the fact that a significant number of Christians fail to make the effort to live the life of Christ, in their advocacy of war, unjust economic policies, and lack of tolerance of other faiths, and those free from faith in particular.
Actually, I think whether Gandhi said it or not is very relevant, especially since I created the topic. I dont believe in falsely attributing quotes to people. Especially when they defame the message that person taught.

And there is no disputing that Christians fail to live up to Christ's teaching and some even fail to try. But Christ has patience and will continue to entice them to follow Him all of their days. Those who try to malign Christians don't.
 
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Avatar4321

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Gandhi's point is that very few Christians are "Christ-like".
And my point is that Gandhi never said it. And I think it's rather deceptive to attribute a quote to a man claiming he didn't like Christians when his teaching and actions dictated otherwise.
 
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This quote has bothered me for a while. We have here Gandhi, who started a movement to free idea based on loving his fellow man saying he doesn't like a specific group of people, namely Christians.

Yet, if this quote is true, he spend a lot of time associating with Christians. He spent alot of time loving this group that he supposedly didn't like. It seems odd to me.

Another odd thing, no matter how much I search, there seems to be no source for the quote. Which, of course, leads me to believe that it's likely not an accurate quote.

However, despite my indepth study of Gandhi, I am not an expert. So I contacted an expert earlier. And oddly enough they have never found a source for that quote either.

Now is it moral to continue to attribute a quote to a man when no source can be provided and that man's teachings and actions seem to contradict the point of the quote.

As for the substance of the quote, no Christian does live the Gospel. If he did, we wouldn't need the Atonement of Christ.
I do not know if the quote is accurate.

But the sentiment of it rings true to me.

Very few Christians impress me as living lives even remotely Christ-like.

Certainly I don't.
Do you try to live a Christ-like life?
 
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Avatar4321

Avatar4321

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Reporter: “Mr. Gandhi, what do you think of Western civilization?”
Gandhi: “I think it would be a good idea!”
Now that one I believe is from Him. I think ive read that in one of my many gandhi sources.

I could be wrong cause there is no source here either.
 
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Avatar4321

Avatar4321

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If you believe the point of the statements that is accurate, that is one thing. But to attribute it to someone else in order to claim its authorative is another.
 

Dragon

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Here, let's fix the confusion:

"I like your Christ. I don't much like your Christianity. It doesn't seem very much like your Christ." -- Dragon

There. Now, whether Gandhi said something similar to that or not, I just did, so we can discuss it independently of verifying whether or not I am plagiarizing him. The above also removes us from the side-issue of whether Christians personally and individually fall short of the example of Christ, which no Christian would deny and which is not really saying anything pertinent.

There is a problem in Christianity as it is practiced in most denominations. It veers very far away from the teachings of Christ, as expressed in the Gospels, in its claims to exclusive possession of the truth, its hostility to and intolerance of other faiths, and its elevation of material success and political power over and above holiness and dedication to God. It places God in the written word, and in fixed and inflexible rules and regulations, not in the still small voice in the heart, nor in the inner fire that moves the heart to love. The things that Jesus said so angrily about the Pharisees are today all true of most of the religions that pretend to follow his teachings: whitewashed sepulchers, a generation of vipers, who strain at a gnat and swallow a camel, who wash the outside of the cup carefully and leave the inside filthy.

I believe that most of this can be traced back to an event that occurred in the year 325 AD: the Council of Nicaea, and the founding of what I call the Imperial Church.

Initially following the crucifixion, the followers of Jesus consisted of a small group of Jews who lived in Jerusalem, led by the Apostles, especially Peter and James, Jesus' brother. These people saw themselves as a Jewish sect, although the Jewish authorities considered them heretical. Paul of Tarsus, after his conversion, separated Jesus' teachings from Judaism, preached to the gentiles, and founded what can be called "Pauline Christianity" as distinct from the "Jewish Christianity" that existed from Jesus' teachings and his closest followers.

Pauline Christianity was an illegal religion in the Roman Empire for centuries but the laws against it were seldom enforced. What that meant in practice was that it was a free religion, with no enforceable authority (the state would not back it and sometimes cracked down on it). It was highly diverse, even more so than Christianity today. There was no Bible as such. Some Christians honored the Old Testament, but not all. Many Christian writings circulated, including gospels, letters allegedly from the Apostles, books of prophecy, and books of liturgy, but none of these was "canonical" as there was no authority to make them so. Some Christian sects were structured and authoritarian and elected "bishops" to govern them. Others were free-wheeling and libertarian and did not. Some Christian sects were ascetic. Others practiced free love. Some were millennial, others more practical.

In 325, the emperor Constantine, who wanted Christianity to become the new state religion of the Roman Empire, called a convocation of "bishops" (all from the authoritarian Christian sects, of course, as they were the only ones who had "bishops") to meet at Nicaea in Greece and hammer out a creed that would be binding on all Christians and a canonical scripture. The Emperor himself did not directly intervene in the discussions, but it was understood that he wanted an instrument that would support the power of the throne. This the bishops gave him, not without dispute and controversy, but in the end producing the Nicene Creed and the New Testament, proclaiming four gospels, one account of the Apostles, a number of apostolic letters, and one book of prophecy canonical and sacred and all others false and heretical. Under Constantine and his successors, this Imperial Church replaced the freewheeling Pauline Christianity, ground all dissidents under its heel, and was responsible for more persecution of Christians than the pagans ever had attempted. The Church became a political organization first and a religious one second.

Later, the Imperial Church would split into the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches. Later still, the Protestant Reformation would break away from the Roman Catholic Church. In all cases, however, the essential authoritarian, doctrinaire error of the original Imperial Church was preserved.

If Christians want to get back to the heart of Jesus' teachings, this is what they must do:

1) Abandon Biblical authority and infallibility. The Bible can be an inspiration and a guide, but if taken as an authority it becomes a prison.

2) Abandon fixation on permanent rules and regulations. That's not what Jesus was about. Remember that he reduced the Law to just two commandments: love God with all your heart, and love your neighbor as yourself. Remember that he was infamous for breaking rules he considered senseless, and once proclaimed that the Sabbath (and by extension, the Law itself) was made for man, not vice-versa.

3) Remember that true faith comes from the heart, and is not imposed from above; remember also that God will not fit under your hat, and a person can be following the teachings of Christ who has never heard of him.

A Christianity that does these things will resemble Christ's original movement. My problem with Christianity as it usually exists is that it does not.
 

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