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roomy

roomy

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One Sunday mornin' Lambton went a-fishin' in the Wear;
An' catched a fish upon he's heuk,
He thowt leuk't varry queer,
But whatt'n a kind ov fish it was
Young Lambton cuddent tell.
He waddn't fash te carry'h hyem,
So he hoyed it in a well.

Whisht! lads, haad yor gobs,
An' Aa'll tell ye aall an aaful story,
Whisht! lads, haad yor gobs,
An' Aa'll tell ye 'boot the worm.

Noo Lambton felt inclined te gan
An' fight i' foreign wars.
He joined a troop o' Knights that cared
For nowther woonds nor scars,
An' off he went te Palestine
Wheer queer things him befel,
An' varry seun forgat aboot
The queer worm i' the well.

Chorus

But the worm got fat an' growed an' growed,
An' growed an aaful size;
He'd greet big teeth, a greet big gob,
An' greet big goggle eyes.
An' when at neets he craaled aboot
Te pick up bits o' news,
If he felt dry upon the road,
He milked a dozen coos.

Chorus

This feorful worm wad often feed
On caalves an' lambs an' sheep,
An' swally little bairns alive
When they laid doon te sleep.
An' when he'd eaten aall he cud
An' he had had he's fill,
He craaled away an' lapped he's tail
Seven times roond Pensher Hill.

Chorus

The news of this myest aaful worm
An' his queer gannins on
Seun crossed the seas, gat te the ears
Ov beave an' bowld Sor John.
So hyem he cam an' catched the beast
An' cut 'im in twe haalves
An' that seun stopped he's eatin' bairns
An' sheep an' lambs and caalves.

Chorus

So noo ye knaa hoo aall th foaks
On byeth sides ov the Wear
Lost lots o' sheep an' lots o' sleep
An' leeved i' mortal feor.
So let's have one to brave Sor John
That kept the bairns frae harm,
Saved coos an' caalves by myekin' haalves
O' the famis' Lambton Worm.

Noo lads, Aa'll haad me gob,
That's aall Aa knaa aboot the story
Ov Sor John's clivvor job
Wi' the aaful Lambton Worm.
 
S

Shattered

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That post wasn't antagonistic in the least, was it?

For the record.. :gives:
 

KarlMarx

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roomy said:
It is obvious to me that you do.:baby4: Did I tell you I am happily married, sorry dumpling, stalk someone else please, or do what you do best(we both know what that is):smoke:
A legend in his own mind....

if you're happily married, what are you doing taunting women here? Trying to improve Anglo-American relations or just showing us American guys how suave you limeys are?
 
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roomy

roomy

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WHEN THE BOAT COMES IN


Come here, maw little Jacky,
Now aw've smoked mi backy,
Let's hev a bit o' cracky,
Till the boat comes in.

Chorus
Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
Thou shall hev a fishy when the boat comes in.

Here's thy mother humming,
Like a canny woman;
Yonder comes thy father,
Drunk - he cannot stand.

Chorus
Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
Thou shall hev a haddock when the boat comes in.

Our Tommy's always fuddling,
He's so fond of ale,
But he's kind to me,
I hope he'll never fail.

Chorus
Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
Thou shall hev a bloater when the boat comes in.

I like a drop mysel',
When I can get it sly,
And thou, my bonny bairn,
Will lik't as well as I.

Chorus
Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
Thou shall hev a mackerel when the boat comes in.

May we get a drop,
Oft as we stand in need;
And weel may the keel row
That brings the bairns their bread.

Chorus
Dance ti' thy daddy, sing ti' thy mammy,
Dance ti' thy daddy, ti' thy mammy sing;
Thou shall hev a fishy on a little dishy,
Thou shall hev a salmon when the boat comes in.
 
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roomy

roomy

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http://www.une.edu.au/langnet/geordie.htm



English people asked to name a famous Geordie would probably choose a soccer player such as Alan Shearer, until recently England's captain, or Paul "Gazza" Gascoigne, the tabloid reporter's dream with a sublime footballing talent only matched by a penchant for self-destruction. We Geordies (or should I say "us Geordies"?) -- the inhabitants of the city of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and its surrounding area -- are often perceived by the rest of the country as friendly, somewhat unsophisticated folks, usually fanatical football supporters who like their beer and tabs ('cigarettes'). The word tab has even gained currency recently among student populations in the rest of the country, who also favour the occasional "Newkie Brown" (Newcastle Brown Ale). This latter name would actually sound very strange to natives of the North-east, who usually refer to their iconic drink more succinctly as dog or simply Broon. A rather unflattering Geordie stereotype is amusingly caricatured by Reg Smythe's cartoon strip character, the outrageously politically incorrect but likable rogue, Andy Capp (You can check out the latest strip at http://www.creators.com/comics/capp/.)

The word "Geordie" is said to date from the early 18th century, when Newcastle people declared support for the English kings George I and II, in opposition to the rest of the population of Northumberland, who supported the Scottish Jacobite rebellions. Although the name is localised to the Newcastle area, the dialect here merges gradually into the Northumbrian and Scottish dialects to the north and to a lesser extent into Durham and Yorkshire varieties to the south. The variety described here includes that of the region immediately surrounding the city of Newcastle and the villages of East Northumberland to the north that I am more familiar with. These villages, until recently depending largely on the coal industry, are home to many of the broader dialect speakers.

Visitors from the south of England are typically nonplussed by a broad Geordie speaker, which has prompted some to claim that Geordie could even be considered a separate language. A broad accent is certainly not intelligible to many other native English-speakers at a first listening. Peter Beardsley, another soccer player and Geordie icon, even suffered the indignity of having English sub-titles on all his television interviews. This unintelligibility is due to a combination of variations on standard sounds, especially vowels, and the use of various distinctive words and grammatical structures. In recent years, the problem of mis-communication has diminished to a degree. Not only have Newcastle residents accommodated somewhat to the norms of Standard English, but the Geordie accent has become better known to the rest of the country through television series such as "The Likely Lads" and "Auf Wiedersehen, Pet" and the cult movie "Get Carter." Others from the entertainment industry associated with Newcastle include the rock bands The Animals and Dire Straits, the singer and environmental activist Sting and singer, actor and hard-man Jimmy Nail.

The relationship between the local dialect and standard English, like in other parts of Britain, has not always been comfortable. Nonstandard pronunciation and grammatical forms have been widely proscribed in school classes, and speakers of the dialect themselves will often express a view that their language is substandard or bad. Until very recently, there has been no educated role model on radio or television, and many people from the area feel that they are discriminated against on the basis of the way they speak.

This is not unique to people from the Newcastle region, of course, but publicity over a couple of recent events has highlighted these problems. The failure of an exceptionally well-qualified applicant from a Tyneside comprehensive school to negotiate an interview for Oxford University received wide publicity, including accusations of elitism from the Chancellor Gordon Brown, and other ministers in the labour government. Similarly, the rustication of a Geordie female officer cadet from the British Army's Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst renewed suspicion that accent may still be a cause of discrimination, although this was strongly denied by the Sandhurst administration. The officer cadet in question claimed that fellow cadets taunted her with shouts of Whey aye, man! and she was told by her instructor that use of the word knackered ('exhausted') should be replaced by the more genteel "pooped". She also alleges that she was warned that Geordie speech patterns such as sentence-final "like" were not becoming of an officer and should be eliminated from her speech. As she put it, "Because I spoke differently they thought I was thick" (The Times, May 6th 2000).

Nowadays, many educated Geordies, especially in the urban area, have a wider degree of competence in both standard and nonstandard speech so that, depending on context, they have a range of forms at their disposal. Generally, the more informal the context, the greater the number of dialect features. There are also signs of a growing pride in the distinctive nature of the dialect, with Geordie dictionaries, versions of bible stories and so on, appearing on the market, even if somewhat self-deprecating in tone. There are also bumper stickers with humorous messages such as Divn't dunsh us, I'm a Geordie! (= 'Don't bump into me').
 

KarlMarx

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Is this all about soccer? Oh... did the US lose to England? Wow.... how come the sun is shining and why haven't the stars fallen out of the heavens?

I'll give you an answer....This is another of "I don't give a flying f***" items. To me, sports is up there in importance with Starr Jones' latest problems, Brittany Spears life, and Paris Hilton. In other words... "who gives a flying f***?"

In Roman times, the masses used to go to gladiatorial games to watch lions kill Christians, gladiators kill each other, lions kill other lions. Today, the world has replaced it with soccer. The only difference between the two is that the maiming and killing now occurs on the outside of the stadium.
 
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roomy

roomy

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KarlMarx said:
Is this all about soccer? Oh... did the US lose to England? Wow.... how come the sun is shining and why haven't the stars fallen out of the heavens?

I'll give you an answer....This is another of "I don't give a flying f***" items. To me, sports is up there in importance with Starr Jones' latest problems, Brittany Spears life, and Paris Hilton. In other words... "who gives a flying f***?"

In Roman times, the masses used to go to gladiatorial games to watch lions kill Christians, gladiators kill each other, lions kill other lions. Today, the world has replaced it with soccer. The only difference between the two is that the maiming and killing now occurs on the outside of the stadium.


Excellent, I don't know what the fuck you are talking about, but it was excellent:salute: Do you like the songs?
 

KarlMarx

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roomy said:
Excellent, I don't know what the fuck you are talking about, but it was excellent:salute: Do you like the songs?
some things are best left ignored... roomy is one of them....
 

KarlMarx

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roomy said:
Toodleoo then.You may find that I am unignorable, is there such a word?:teeth:
I believe the word "ignoble" is more appropriate.
 

no1tovote4

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They were hard to read in that written "accent"... Let accents be voiced, not written...

Hard for us Americans to read it in English that way...
 
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roomy

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no1tovote4 said:
They were hard to read in that written "accent"... Let accents be voiced, not written...

Hard for us Americans to read it in English that way...

There is a link in one of my posts which does translate some Geordie words, which should give you the flavour of it, they are spoken as they are written, but probably spoken faster than you are used to speaking.
 

MissileMan

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roomy said:
Gob = mouth, as in "shut ya gob":cool:

Ahh!

Thought "haad your gob" might be trying to say "hide your gob" or hide your tongue to say be quiet.
I think it's kinda fun to have it spelled phonetically and try to decipher it. Thanks for the post.
 

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