Germany’s Bild Newspaper Says ‘Lockdown Was a Huge Mistake’

bripat9643

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Even the Europeans are starting to get wise to this scam:


https://www.breitbart.com/health/2020/05/11/germanys-das-bild-says-lockdown-was-a-huge-mistake/

Europe’s best-selling newspaper announced this weekend the lockdown in response to the Chinese coronavirus pandemic was a “huge mistake,” citing a number of public intellectuals critical of the country’s official response. Reproducing comments from seven well-known intellectuals, Bild underscores the importance of “warning, doubting, and arguing” in the case of a public crisis that involves the suppression of the fundamental rights of citizens.
 

Andylusion

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In the Preradovic interview, Prof Homburg called the lockdown “totally superfluous” and “incredibly harmful,” not only to the economy, but also to the psychological and physical well-being of uncountable individuals who were prevented from having lifesaving operations or were contemplating suicide.
 

$mith

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"Das Bild" is a tabloid, notorious for its mix of gossip, inflammatory language, and sensationalism ... similar to the British newspaper "The Sun".
 

$mith

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During lockdown, hospitals continued to provide emergency services and treat life-threatening cases.

So it wasn't the lockdown that was "incredibly harmful to uncountable individuals who were prevented from having lifesaving operations" - it was a health system unable to cope with thousands of patients due the Covid-19 pandemic.
 

Polishprince

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Even the Europeans are starting to get wise to this scam:


https://www.breitbart.com/health/2020/05/11/germanys-das-bild-says-lockdown-was-a-huge-mistake/

Europe’s best-selling newspaper announced this weekend the lockdown in response to the Chinese coronavirus pandemic was a “huge mistake,” citing a number of public intellectuals critical of the country’s official response. Reproducing comments from seven well-known intellectuals, Bild underscores the importance of “warning, doubting, and arguing” in the case of a public crisis that involves the suppression of the fundamental rights of citizens.

The purpose of the Lockdown was presumably to "flatten the curve" to prevent over stressing the healthcare system.

But the real purpose was to have an excuse to stop President Trump's successful and popular rallies. The German Fuhrerette hates Trump but didn't realize what she was signing on to. Just started to spin out of control, and here we are. Technocrat boobs like Tony Fauci are being named the "sexiest man alive". He'll never give this up willingly.
 

Meister

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During lockdown, hospitals continued to provide emergency services and treat life-threatening cases.

So it wasn't the lockdown that was "incredibly harmful to uncountable individuals who were prevented from having lifesaving operations" - it was a health system unable to cope with thousands of patients due the Covid-19 pandemic.
Which hospitals are you referring to?
 

$mith

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In 1986, Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) to ensure public access to emergency services regardless of ability to pay. Section 1867 of the Social Security Act imposes specific obligations on Medicare-participating hospitals that offer emergency services to provide a medical screening examination (MSE) when a request is made for examination or treatment for an emergency medical condition (EMC), including active labor, regardless of an individual's ability to pay. Hospitals are then required to provide stabilizing treatment for patients with EMCs. If a hospital is unable to stabilize a patient within its capability, or if the patient requests, an appropriate transfer should be implemented.

Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) | CMS

A temporary hospital lockdown to deal with a breakout of Covid-19 infected patients & staff is a different matter.

 

Deplorable Yankee

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In 1986, Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) to ensure public access to emergency services regardless of ability to pay. Section 1867 of the Social Security Act imposes specific obligations on Medicare-participating hospitals that offer emergency services to provide a medical screening examination (MSE) when a request is made for examination or treatment for an emergency medical condition (EMC), including active labor, regardless of an individual's ability to pay. Hospitals are then required to provide stabilizing treatment for patients with EMCs. If a hospital is unable to stabilize a patient within its capability, or if the patient requests, an appropriate transfer should be implemented.

Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) | CMS

A temporary hospital lockdown to deal with a breakout of Covid-19 infected patients & staff is a different matter.
Answer the question the mod asked
We want to know what hospitals are you talking about ?
 

$mith

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In the Preradovic interview, Prof Homburg called the lockdown “totally superfluous” and “incredibly harmful,” not only to the economy, but also to the psychological and physical well-being of uncountable individuals who were prevented from having lifesaving operations or were contemplating suicide.
Could you specify how the lockdown prevented "uncountable individuals from having lifesaving operations"?
 

$mith

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In 1986, Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) to ensure public access to emergency services regardless of ability to pay. Section 1867 of the Social Security Act imposes specific obligations on Medicare-participating hospitals that offer emergency services to provide a medical screening examination (MSE) when a request is made for examination or treatment for an emergency medical condition (EMC), including active labor, regardless of an individual's ability to pay. Hospitals are then required to provide stabilizing treatment for patients with EMCs. If a hospital is unable to stabilize a patient within its capability, or if the patient requests, an appropriate transfer should be implemented.

Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) | CMS

A temporary hospital lockdown to deal with a breakout of Covid-19 infected patients & staff is a different matter.
Answer the question the mod asked
We want to know what hospitals are you talking about ?
The Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) clearly states Medicare-participating hospitals. If you want the list, kindly do your own Google search.

What should be asked is whether Andylusion is aware if any Medicare participating hospitals refused emergency treatment to those "uncountable individuals".
 

Deplorable Yankee

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In 1986, Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) to ensure public access to emergency services regardless of ability to pay. Section 1867 of the Social Security Act imposes specific obligations on Medicare-participating hospitals that offer emergency services to provide a medical screening examination (MSE) when a request is made for examination or treatment for an emergency medical condition (EMC), including active labor, regardless of an individual's ability to pay. Hospitals are then required to provide stabilizing treatment for patients with EMCs. If a hospital is unable to stabilize a patient within its capability, or if the patient requests, an appropriate transfer should be implemented.

Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) | CMS

A temporary hospital lockdown to deal with a breakout of Covid-19 infected patients & staff is a different matter.
Answer the question the mod asked
We want to know what hospitals are you talking about ?
The Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) clearly states Medicare-participating hospitals. If you want the list, kindly do your own Google search.

What should be asked is whether Andylusion is aware if any Medicare participating hospitals refused emergency treatment to those "uncountable individuals".
Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients
And heart attacks along with cancer no longer happens

Stay home stay safe we're all in this togehtherrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Ducking brainwashed idiots
 

$mith

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In 1986, Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) to ensure public access to emergency services regardless of ability to pay. Section 1867 of the Social Security Act imposes specific obligations on Medicare-participating hospitals that offer emergency services to provide a medical screening examination (MSE) when a request is made for examination or treatment for an emergency medical condition (EMC), including active labor, regardless of an individual's ability to pay. Hospitals are then required to provide stabilizing treatment for patients with EMCs. If a hospital is unable to stabilize a patient within its capability, or if the patient requests, an appropriate transfer should be implemented.

Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) | CMS

A temporary hospital lockdown to deal with a breakout of Covid-19 infected patients & staff is a different matter.
Answer the question the mod asked
We want to know what hospitals are you talking about ?
The Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) clearly states Medicare-participating hospitals. If you want the list, kindly do your own Google search.

What should be asked is whether Andylusion is aware if any Medicare participating hospitals refused emergency treatment to those "uncountable individuals".
Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients
And heart attacks along with cancer no longer happens
Do you have reported facts/evidence for your comment "Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients"?
 

Deplorable Yankee

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In 1986, Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) to ensure public access to emergency services regardless of ability to pay. Section 1867 of the Social Security Act imposes specific obligations on Medicare-participating hospitals that offer emergency services to provide a medical screening examination (MSE) when a request is made for examination or treatment for an emergency medical condition (EMC), including active labor, regardless of an individual's ability to pay. Hospitals are then required to provide stabilizing treatment for patients with EMCs. If a hospital is unable to stabilize a patient within its capability, or if the patient requests, an appropriate transfer should be implemented.

Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) | CMS

A temporary hospital lockdown to deal with a breakout of Covid-19 infected patients & staff is a different matter.
Answer the question the mod asked
We want to know what hospitals are you talking about ?
The Emergency Medical Treatment & Labor Act (EMTALA) clearly states Medicare-participating hospitals. If you want the list, kindly do your own Google search.

What should be asked is whether Andylusion is aware if any Medicare participating hospitals refused emergency treatment to those "uncountable individuals".
Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients
And heart attacks along with cancer no longer happens
Do you have reported facts/evidence for your comment "Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients"?
Yes
 

Litwin

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Even the Europeans are starting to get wise to this scam:


https://www.breitbart.com/health/2020/05/11/germanys-das-bild-says-lockdown-was-a-huge-mistake/

Europe’s best-selling newspaper announced this weekend the lockdown in response to the Chinese coronavirus pandemic was a “huge mistake,” citing a number of public intellectuals critical of the country’s official response. Reproducing comments from seven well-known intellectuals, Bild underscores the importance of “warning, doubting, and arguing” in the case of a public crisis that involves the suppression of the fundamental rights of citizens.
is Bild a tabloid with nude chicks on the first page ?
1589273448801.png

1589273440760.png
 

$mith

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[/QUOTE]
Do you have reported facts/evidence for your comment "Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients"?
[/QUOTE]
Yes
[/QUOTE]

Unless your comment "seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients" is backed-up by reported facts/evidence, it is no more than something plucked out of thin air.

If you have the evidence (as you claim), where is it?
 

Mindful

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During lockdown, hospitals continued to provide emergency services and treat life-threatening cases.

So it wasn't the lockdown that was "incredibly harmful to uncountable individuals who were prevented from having lifesaving operations" - it was a health system unable to cope with thousands of patients due the Covid-19 pandemic.
It got a good reputation for investigative journalism, and political content.

You have to have a qualified grasp of English to create the play on words in The Sun.
 

bear513

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In the Preradovic interview, Prof Homburg called the lockdown “totally superfluous” and “incredibly harmful,” not only to the economy, but also to the psychological and physical well-being of uncountable individuals who were prevented from having lifesaving operations or were contemplating suicide.
Could you specify how the lockdown prevented "uncountable individuals from having lifesaving operations"?
Don't try to change the goal posts, please answer the question.
 

bear513

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Do you have reported facts/evidence for your comment "Seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients"?
Unless your comment "seems hospitals are laying off people due to lack of all kinds of patients" is backed-up by reported facts/evidence, it is no more than something plucked out of thin air.

If you have the evidence (as you claim), where is it?
[/QUOTE]
Supply and demand it's obvious, all the non essential treatments have been put on hold like dental, eye exams for one. And please get your quotes right.
 

$mith

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There is nothing online (in English) that I could find to support that Bild.de has a good reputation for investigative journalism and political content.

I appreciate your comment about The Sun.
 

Mindful

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There is nothing online (in English) that I could find to support that Bild.de has a good reputation for investigative journalism and political content.

I appreciate your comment about The Sun.
There is nothing on line, because I relied on my own judgement and independent thinking.
 

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