Fuel Economy Improvement - is it possible?

DGS49

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From all indications, the Gen I+ Toyota Tundra was a remarkable truck. It is stylish, well-equipped, well thought out, and seemingly lasts forever. The standard V8 was a 4.7 liter motor and basically everyone who reviewed it considered it totally satisfactory for the application.

But the gas mileage, both theoretical and actual appears to be horrible. It is rated at something like 14/18, and many owners report not even getting that much.

There are things one can do to make small, incremental improvement is fuel economy. Drive like an old woman, maximize tire pressure and get low-rolling resistance tires, make sure it is running properly.

But is there anything else that can make a significant improvement? For example, is it feasible to change the final drive ratio with different diff gearing?

If the Tundra gets 15mpg on average and you are comparing it to a minimally-tolerable 20 at 12k miles per year, the gas hog will burn about a thousand dollars more in gas per year.

Anyone here know about this stuff?
 

Likkmee

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My 1976 Land Cruiser diesel gets between 28-31 , depending on the roads.It was never allowed in The Empire.Inc.
It has less emissions and twice the mileage of my Isuzu Trooper
 

Persistence Of Memory

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I drive a 1978 Tornado Brougham with a 425 4B . Front wheel drive.
It needs 93 octane. I get around 12 in the city and about 17 on the highway. It weighs 5000 lbs. Lol

If it has an air bag, I won't drive it.
 

Rigby5

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Besides switching to a diesel engine, which likely would be difficult to fit to the drive train, about the only thing one can reasonably do is go with larger diameter tires, and that would reduce towing power.
An overdrive in the drive shaft would work, but only in 2 wheel drive.
 

Moonglow

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From all indications, the Gen I+ Toyota Tundra was a remarkable truck. It is stylish, well-equipped, well thought out, and seemingly lasts forever. The standard V8 was a 4.7 liter motor and basically everyone who reviewed it considered it totally satisfactory for the application.

But the gas mileage, both theoretical and actual appears to be horrible. It is rated at something like 14/18, and many owners report not even getting that much.

There are things one can do to make small, incremental improvement is fuel economy. Drive like an old woman, maximize tire pressure and get low-rolling resistance tires, make sure it is running properly.

But is there anything else that can make a significant improvement? For example, is it feasible to change the final drive ratio with different diff gearing?

If the Tundra gets 15mpg on average and you are comparing it to a minimally-tolerable 20 at 12k miles per year, the gas hog will burn about a thousand dollars more in gas per year.

Anyone here know about this stuff?
What is the suggested retail price?
 
OP
DGS49

DGS49

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Focusing on years 2004-6, a nice example with 100k on the odometer is in the $12-14k range.

Given the age and durability of the vehicle, there are many that are still around with 150k+ on the odometer, and they appear to be in good working condition. My interest would be in a RWD truck with the "Luxury" package. They are out there.

Just one of many options being considered for my next vehicle. But I won't trade right away. When the travel restrictions are lifted I will move.
 

Blues Man

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What about improving the aerodynamics with a tonneau cover or a bed cap or a net for the tailgate ?

An open bed acts like a parachute
 

Jarlaxle

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I drive a 1978 Tornado Brougham with a 425 4B . Front wheel drive.
It needs 93 octane. I get around 12 in the city and about 17 on the highway. It weighs 5000 lbs. Lol

If it has an air bag, I won't drive it.
Bullshit. It has a 350 or 403, neither with <200hp, and would probably run on 83 octane.
 

Persistence Of Memory

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I drive a 1978 Tornado Brougham with a 425 4B . Front wheel drive.
It needs 93 octane. I get around 12 in the city and about 17 on the highway. It weighs 5000 lbs. Lol

If it has an air bag, I won't drive it.
Bullshit. It has a 350 or 403, neither with <200hp, and would probably run on 83 octane.
I already made the clarification Jack. I need 93 or I hear every lifter pal. Show me a Tornado with a 350 Mr mechanic.

I have 10 Oldsmobiles. How many have you had?
 

Jarlaxle

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I drive a 1978 Tornado Brougham with a 425 4B . Front wheel drive.
It needs 93 octane. I get around 12 in the city and about 17 on the highway. It weighs 5000 lbs. Lol

If it has an air bag, I won't drive it.
Bullshit. It has a 350 or 403, neither with <200hp, and would probably run on 83 octane.
I already made the clarification Jack. I need 93 or I hear every lifter pal. Show me a Tornado(sic) with a 350 Mr mechanic.

I have 10 Oldsmobiles. How many have you had?
350 Olds was the only gas engine for 1979, optional (307 standard) for 1980. After 1980, the largest engine available was the Olds 307, with the 252 Buick V6 standard.

Fuel octane rating has nothing to do with lifters. The Olds 403 had very low compression (7.7-7.8 range, the official spec notwithstanding, strangled by primitive emission equipment to 185hp) and will burn damn near anything without knocking.

And it is TORONADO, not Tornado.
 

miketx

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I drive a 1978 Tornado Brougham with a 425 4B . Front wheel drive.
It needs 93 octane. I get around 12 in the city and about 17 on the highway. It weighs 5000 lbs. Lol

If it has an air bag, I won't drive it.
It had a 425 transmission.
 

luchitociencia

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It will depend on what are you going to do with the Tundra truck.

You work plowing snow, pulling a house trailer, carrying heavy loads of dirt, wood logs, you name it, then the truck will usually run at 12/14 miles per gallon, and you will be happy. No choice.

You will be happy because your Tundra will last many years doing that kind of tasks without problems, because it was made for such kind of heavy work. (Of course 4.7 liters is not comparable at all with the 5 and 6 liters from Ford, Dodge and Chevy trucks.

But you bought the Tundra just because you feel safe inside the vehicle, from it you can see the legs of women when they stop with the cars besides you at red light, or to carry your tools in a tool box on the back, and sporadically carrying a heavy engine, but mostly two chairs and a plant your wife bought from Home Depot, and because it has more phone chargers and cool stereo system.., then don't buy that truck, you are wasting money in gas for nothing.

The issue itself is not about fuel economy alone but force needed from the engine and also from the transmission. I was surprised 5 years ago with the Nissan Frontier making barely 14 miles per gallon while the Chevy Colorado was 17 miles per gallon. And Chevy vehicles were always known because their excellent reliability at the cost of high gas consumption, but having a Japanese truck making lesser miles per gallon was simple something amazing. (And the look of the Colorado was more cool than the Frontier).

Many guys still keep buying those old 1990's early 2000's Ford F250 diesel 8cyl 7.3 liters, even when those make 10 miles per gallon in real use with load included, but are strong and will finish the race everytime those are needed. For the work those can perform, saving gas is secondary, what is needed is their power.
 

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