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EV's are the future

hadit

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
 

ding

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
Right. It's not as simple or easy as some would believe. Then there's the issue of where that electricity will come from and whether or not it actually changes carbon emissions or just the source or location of those emissions.

But getting back to your original idea, I don't see how having spare batteries where they are needed and when they are needed is workable.
 

hadit

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
Right. It's not as simple or easy as some would believe. Then there's the issue of where that electricity will come from and whether or not it actually changes carbon emissions or just the source or location of those emissions.

But getting back to your original idea, I don't see how having spare batteries where they are needed and when they are needed is workable.
I agree, at least not with the batteries we have now. They would need to be cheap, safe and readily available to make that happen.
 

ding

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
Right. It's not as simple or easy as some would believe. Then there's the issue of where that electricity will come from and whether or not it actually changes carbon emissions or just the source or location of those emissions.

But getting back to your original idea, I don't see how having spare batteries where they are needed and when they are needed is workable.
I agree, at least not with the batteries we have now. They would need to be cheap, safe and readily available to make that happen.
It's the readily available part (when and where) that has me stumped. A motorist would have to take that on faith.
 

hadit

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
Right. It's not as simple or easy as some would believe. Then there's the issue of where that electricity will come from and whether or not it actually changes carbon emissions or just the source or location of those emissions.

But getting back to your original idea, I don't see how having spare batteries where they are needed and when they are needed is workable.
I agree, at least not with the batteries we have now. They would need to be cheap, safe and readily available to make that happen.
It's the readily available part (when and where) that has me stumped. A motorist would have to take that on faith.
That's true, and brings to mind when ICE's were first adopted. Until the infrastructure was built out to get gasoline to gas stations on every corner, motorists faced the same issues. Where can I fill my tank? For a long trip I'll take the train because I don't want to run out of gas in the boonies. It's a chicken and egg thing, you need infrastructure to generate more EV sales, and you need more EV sales to incentivize the infrastructure build out. I predict if batteries can become cheap and readily available, we'll see that kind of thing pop up.
 

ding

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
Right. It's not as simple or easy as some would believe. Then there's the issue of where that electricity will come from and whether or not it actually changes carbon emissions or just the source or location of those emissions.

But getting back to your original idea, I don't see how having spare batteries where they are needed and when they are needed is workable.
I agree, at least not with the batteries we have now. They would need to be cheap, safe and readily available to make that happen.
It's the readily available part (when and where) that has me stumped. A motorist would have to take that on faith.
That's true, and brings to mind when ICE's were first adopted. Until the infrastructure was built out to get gasoline to gas stations on every corner, motorists faced the same issues. Where can I fill my tank? For a long trip I'll take the train because I don't want to run out of gas in the boonies. It's a chicken and egg thing, you need infrastructure to generate more EV sales, and you need more EV sales to incentivize the infrastructure build out. I predict if batteries can become cheap and readily available, we'll see that kind of thing pop up.
That's true. But the very nature of gasoline/diesel versus batteries makes the problem for swapping batteries exponentially more difficult. It is orders upon orders of magnitude more difficult.
 

westwall

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Old Rocks

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A few years from now the used EV car market will be flood with cars people can't even give away.
Tesla estimates a full battery pack replacement will cost around $20,000
So who in their right mind would by a used EV knowing that soon it's going to need a very expensive battery to keep it on the road? ... :cool:

Do you realize how easy it is to include battery replacement warranty? If your scenario is what is dooming the sale of future EV's, it can be be solved with one stroke of a pen.

Batteries continue to become more and more efficient, and their charge life are already commensurate with a full tank of gas. I noticed there is now a row of brand new Tesla chargers near my bank, well, I went to the bank Saturday morning, and four of the eight chargers had Tesla's parked and getting a charge.

The dinosaurs will shriek and wail, but their howls of agony grow more quiet by the day as more and more EV's hit the road. Soon the dinosaurs will all be gone, and they'll be as many EV's on the road as gasoline powered cars.
Battery replacement warranty? Have you any idea how expensive that would be? Warranties work on the premise that they cover something that isn't likely to happen during the time it covers. IOW, your car warranty runs out in 2 years. Why do you think that is? It's because the manufacturer knows there's a good chance they won't have to cover much work for that time. So a battery replacement warranty would also only cover a few years, after which you're on your own. Try to sell an EV after running it for 5 years and someone's on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars. You can't sell it.

The only way around that is to make the battery pack modular, with modules easily replaced at any filling station. That allows the batteries to be continually replaced and recharged at the station or at the home. Just like filling a gas tank, you drive into the station, indicate and pay for how many modules you need to have replaced, the automated system pulls our your depleted batteries and replaces them with charged ones. It would take some work and cooperation for all EV's to be fitted with compatible battery compartments, but it could be done. ICE's all have the same opening to fill the tank, for example.

EV's are attractive but are not yet ready to replace ICE's, and bring with them their own set of problems. The glee we see in the usual suspects as they contemplate forcing people to drive cars they otherwise would not choose is, frankly, disgusting.
That's an interesting concept. I like it but assuming you could get manufacturers to standardize on battery design (big if) there is still the problem of knowing that where you stop to swap out batteries hasn't run out of swap-able batteries (much bigger if).
There are a lot of wrinkles that need to be ironed out before it's practical.

1. Cost. The batteries for just one EV run to the tens of thousands of dollars. A station would have to have enough batteries on hand for dozens, if not hundreds, of EV per day and the cost would run into the millions of dollars. They would then be targets for theft.
2. Risk of fire. Batteries burn hot, and storing thousands of them in close proximity is a recipe for disaster. Underground gasoline tanks at gas stations now present the same kind of danger, but it is greater with these batteries.
3. Charging capacity. A station would have to have a reliable source of electricity big enough to charge thousands of individual modules simultaneously.

These can be overcome, but need to be carefully considered. I'm thinking these would be in addition to being able to charge at home. At any rate, the national power grid would have to be rethought, and we would have to push local power generation at individual houses to pull it off.
Really that idea is just not practical, for many of the reasons you pointed out. There will be EV's on the road by the end of this year that will have 500 miles range. With that kind of range, no reason for a quick change battery. However, there is a place for them. In endurance racing, something like an aluminum-air battery in a quick change configuration would be practical. And they would be very practical for aviation. As far as EV's replacing ICE's, that is what is going to happen. The cost of batteries is rapidly reducing, the range is increasing to the point that EV's will exceed the range of ICE's fuel tanks in short order. And the speed of charging is also increasing. The simplicity of the EV will create a far more robust automobile and truck, one that is far cheaper to run and maintain than an ICE. Increase on the grid? About 30%, easily achievable in 5 years.
 
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Old Rocks

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.
 

westwall

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
 
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Old Rocks

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
On the contrary, Tesla has some Tesla S Plaid + on the road already, they are just not being manufactured for sell yet. He likes to test them for a while before putting them on the market. So the do exist, and are actually being driven.
 

westwall

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
On the contrary, Tesla has some Tesla S Plaid + on the road already, they are just not being manufactured for sell yet. He likes to test them for a while before putting them on the market. So the do exist, and are actually being driven.



Test track only so no real world experience. Actual real road tests show Tesla over estimates their range by an average of 27 percent.
 
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Old Rocks

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
On the contrary, Tesla has some Tesla S Plaid + on the road already, they are just not being manufactured for sell yet. He likes to test them for a while before putting them on the market. So the do exist, and are actually being driven.



Test track only so no real world experience. Actual real road tests show Tesla over estimates their range by an average of 27 percent.
The ICE I have is rated for 25 mpg. It gets that on long trips. But, since I live in a city, the real average is about 16 mpg. Why would you expect it to be any different for an EV? Stop and go driving eats up your mileage no matter what you are driving.
 

westwall

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
On the contrary, Tesla has some Tesla S Plaid + on the road already, they are just not being manufactured for sell yet. He likes to test them for a while before putting them on the market. So the do exist, and are actually being driven.



Test track only so no real world experience. Actual real road tests show Tesla over estimates their range by an average of 27 percent.
The ICE I have is rated for 25 mpg. It gets that on long trips. But, since I live in a city, the real average is about 16 mpg. Why would you expect it to be any different for an EV? Stop and go driving eats up your mileage no matter what you are driving.






No ICE vehicle I have over estimates mpg at the rate that Tesla over rates theirs.

You keep talking about EV'S taking over yet they can't come close to competing in an endurance race. Formula E races for two thirds the distance of a regular F1 race, at 3/4 the speed, and they have to use two cars to even manage that.
 
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O

Old Rocks

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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
On the contrary, Tesla has some Tesla S Plaid + on the road already, they are just not being manufactured for sell yet. He likes to test them for a while before putting them on the market. So the do exist, and are actually being driven.



Test track only so no real world experience. Actual real road tests show Tesla over estimates their range by an average of 27 percent.
The ICE I have is rated for 25 mpg. It gets that on long trips. But, since I live in a city, the real average is about 16 mpg. Why would you expect it to be any different for an EV? Stop and go driving eats up your mileage no matter what you are driving.






No ICE vehicle I have over estimates mpg at the rate that Tesla over rates theirs.

You keep talking about EV'S taking over yet they can't come close to competing in an endurance race. Formula E races for two thirds the distance of a regular F1 race, at 3/4 the speed, and they have to use two cars to even manage that.
At present. But they have done very well at Pikes Peak. As the different types of batteries come online, it will not take long before they are fully competitive in endurance races, and a couple of years after that, the ICE's will no longer be competitive.
 

westwall

LET'S GO BRANDON!
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And you have never seen anyone run their car out of gas? Even with some of the new EV's getting 500 to 600 miles per charge, some people will still run them until they have no charge left.





Link to an EV getting 500 miles. I asked for one before and you avoided it like the plague.

So, liar, post a link to an EV with PROVEN 500 mile range.
In 2022, several manufacturers will have EV's out with that range. Not included here are the Chinese manufacturers like BYD that are also planning to have vehicles with that kind of range. Nor is the Tesla semi included.






So, you lied again. As usual. No EV exists with the range you claimed.

How typical.
On the contrary, Tesla has some Tesla S Plaid + on the road already, they are just not being manufactured for sell yet. He likes to test them for a while before putting them on the market. So the do exist, and are actually being driven.



Test track only so no real world experience. Actual real road tests show Tesla over estimates their range by an average of 27 percent.
The ICE I have is rated for 25 mpg. It gets that on long trips. But, since I live in a city, the real average is about 16 mpg. Why would you expect it to be any different for an EV? Stop and go driving eats up your mileage no matter what you are driving.






No ICE vehicle I have over estimates mpg at the rate that Tesla over rates theirs.

You keep talking about EV'S taking over yet they can't come close to competing in an endurance race. Formula E races for two thirds the distance of a regular F1 race, at 3/4 the speed, and they have to use two cars to even manage that.
At present. But they have done very well at Pikes Peak. As the different types of batteries come online, it will not take long before they are fully competitive in endurance races, and a couple of years after that, the ICE's will no longer be competitive.







Pikes Peak is FOURTEEN MILES! You are flat out dreaming if you think EV'S are going to be entering endurance racing within the next 35 years!

The closest that an EV has gotten to endurance racing is the Isle of Man TT.

The regular bikes do six laps of the island, while the electric bikes do one. The regular bikes do two laps then refuel.

Then another two laps, then done. The regular bikes are 21 miles per hour faster around the circuit even though the electric motor you love so much is supposedly better.

It isn't. The electric bikes also cost seven times as much to go one sixth the distance, at a slower pace.

You simply have no idea what you are talking about.
 

skookerasbil

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lol..........Ive been watching these EV prognosticators going on and on and on and on.........for 10 years now. About the batteries, ("Its coming within 5 years :deal: ) and the dozens of videos of 1,000hp EV's.

Heres the problem..........nobody is buying these things............still. Sales numbers continue to be laughable.......

2020 US Electric Vehicle Sales Report

Listen I get it.........some people are hyper-euphoric about EV's. But Americans just dont want them........as evidenced by Toyota producing zero electric cars. Those mofu's are smart........they know the American market......most other manufacturers have EV's in their lineup for one reason: to balance out the SAE standards so they can sell big-ass power conventional gas guzzling beasts!:rock::rock:...........d0y
 

candycorn

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As the batteries get better and cheaper, by 2025, the EV's will achieve price parity with ICE's, and from then on, it will be all downhill for the ICE's. Because the EV's require far less maintenance, cost far less per mile to run, and you can even make you own fuel for them with some solar panels. Plus they out perform ICE's in acceleration. Proof of that is that Ford is now building E-mustangs and E-150's. And virtually every other manufacture is adding EV''s to their product line. With more utilities encouraging VPP's, that will be even more incentive for owning an EV.
's,
Just got this in my inbox:

1635179573820.png
 

Captain Caveman

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As the batteries get better and cheaper, by 2025, the EV's will achieve price parity with ICE's, and from then on, it will be all downhill for the ICE's. Because the EV's require far less maintenance, cost far less per mile to run, and you can even make you own fuel for them with some solar panels. Plus they out perform ICE's in acceleration. Proof of that is that Ford is now building E-mustangs and E-150's. And virtually every other manufacture is adding EV''s to their product line. With more utilities encouraging VPP's, that will be even more incentive for owning an EV.
's,
EV's may be the future, they may not. One thing is certain, an alternative to ICE vehicles is certain.

As for your unlinked claims, thus opinion, EV's are not really much cheaper to run the ICE vehicles.

Servicing an EV costs 1.6 to 2.3 times more than an ICE vehicle -


And I read an article in the Free Detroit Press of a guy explaining the joys of owning an EV. Can cost up to 4 times to charge than buy petrol or diesel !! It's a good all round read.


EV's are just a stop gap to a much better viable option to replace ICE vehicles.
 

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