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Clotheslines don’t keep people employed, honey!

mal

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Clotheslines don’t keep people employed, honey!

As we were in our backyard playing last evening, my 4½ year old Daughter asked me what the round patch of dirt was in the lawn.
I told her it was where the clothesline pole used to be and that a clothesline was for hanging clothes out to dry instead of drying them in the dryer like we do now.

Being an inquisitive little one, she asked me the question you OFTEN hear from little ones, “Why, Daddy?” I told her, “Because clotheslines don’t keep people employed, honey!… Coal and Gas production does!”

True Story!

***This malcontent Random Thought was brought to you by a Generous Grant from Excel Energy. Keeping people comfortable year round and helping to keep the Economy going strong by employing people with skilled, good paying and stable jobs. Don’t let the Terrorists win by putting Americans out of work in a Futile Attempt to cool the Earth with your Damned clotheslines!

:)

peace...
 

uscitizen

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You did not mention that people had gotten too lazy to use clotheslines?

Of course much of our economy depends on laziness and waste.
 
OP
mal

mal

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You did not mention that people had gotten too lazy to use clotheslines?

Of course much of our economy depends on laziness and waste.

You and Mr. Clean don't have Dryers then?... :lol:

:)

peace...

Yeah I have one, but I hire a lady to use it for me :)

Still does not invalidate my points though.

Why do you want all of the Children on Earth to Die?...

Your Laziness and Capitalism is Killing the Planet. :lol:

:)

peace...
 

uscitizen

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You and Mr. Clean don't have Dryers then?... :lol:

:)

peace...

Yeah I have one, but I hire a lady to use it for me :)

Still does not invalidate my points though.

Why do you want all of the Children on Earth to Die?...

Your Laziness and Capitalism is Killing the Planet. :lol:

:)

peace...

It would solve the education and unemployment problems.

But I am for single payer health care and childhood vaccinations.
 
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dilloduck

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crap----I thought you could stand in line to get clothes now. :doubt:
 
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ABikerSailor

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I have a clothesline. I like to use it. It's nice to stand out in the sun for a while.
 

uscitizen

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I have a clothesline. I like to use it. It's nice to stand out in the sun for a while.

I just hate it when you carry the clothes in and there is a wasp or two in them.
Bird poop is not cool either.

Plus I am not sure how many of those bounce sheets to hang per yard of line.
 

Old Rocks

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Ain't coal just the neatest way to go? How many more disasters like this are going to happen? How about what is being done to the environment where they are taking to tops off of mountains, filling in the valleys and poisoning all the water downstream?

The use of coal for energy should be terminated within a decade.


Inside the Tennessee Coal Ash Spill - Newsweek.com

On that December night, the dike surrounding the mound collapsed, unleashing a tsunami that coated 300 acres of gorgeous countryside and waterways with 1 billion gallons of gray sludge. The wall of ash surged with such ferocity that it destroyed three homes, including Schean's, which it carried about 40 feet and slammed against that embankment. The wave crumpled docks and wiped out roads and railroad tracks. It swallowed a small island, chewed up poplars and pines, and completely choked two sloughs where deer used to water. Miraculously, no one died; the breach occurred on one of the coldest nights of the year, when everyone was buttoned up indoors. But the devastation was overwhelming. When the ash finally settled, it looked "like the surface of the moon, all gray and craters and mounds," says Janice James, who owned one of the other destroyed homes and also managed to escape. "It was the saddest thing I've ever seen."

Yet the Kingston disaster had only begun to wreak its havoc. The largest industrial spill in U.S. history, it has created an environmental and engineering nightmare. The cleanup effort, which the Environmental Protection Agency is overseeing, could cost as much as $1 billion (though estimates continue to climb) and take years to complete. Meanwhile, the released ash—which is packed with toxins like arsenic, lead, and selenium—threatens to poison the air and water. Congressional committees are investigating the failure, some lawmakers are calling for greater regulation of utilities, and the EPA is probing about 400 other facilities across the country that store ash in similar ways. Yet the debacle has had another, potentially more far-reaching, impact: it has displayed in the most graphic manner imaginable just how dirty coal is. At a time when seemingly everyone from President Barack Obama on down is talking about "clean coal," the spill showed it's anything but. "Kingston opened people's eyes," says Lisa Evans of Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental-law firm. "Clean coal is an impossibility."
 

uscitizen

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Ohh and I forgot the soot on the clothes from the coal burning.

Truth, when I grew up most people heated with coal.
 

Againsheila

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I hang my clothes in the house....helps with the allergies that way. Also helps keep the humidity in the house so that our skin doesn't dry out quite so much in the winter. I don't hang up all those clothes of course, only mine. With all the laundry we do, we'd never survive without a dryer. We have to wash my son's bedding everyday and sometimes more than one set. Not too long ago, he went through 6 sets of sheets and blankets in one night. It's tough having a 22 year old that still wets the bed especially now that he's going through his "I refuse to wear a diaper" phase. Yes, he's low functioning autistic and does have an excuse so no stupid jokes please.
 

Againsheila

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I have a clothesline. I like to use it. It's nice to stand out in the sun for a while.

I just hate it when you carry the clothes in and there is a wasp or two in them.
Bird poop is not cool either.

Plus I am not sure how many of those bounce sheets to hang per yard of line.

LOL, you're suppose to shake out each item before you fold them and put them in the basket and you use liquid fabric softener in the wash rather than bounce on the line. Although, bouncing on the line can be fun when you're a kid, until your mother yells at your to stop.
 

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