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Bonnie & Clyde [1967]

Abishai100

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The iconic American historicultural film Bonnie and Clyde (Arthur Penn), starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway and featuring a stellar supporting cast has become a worldwide gem, capturing all the social drama and romance surrounding the canonization and deification of the two legendary real-life American bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Bonnie and Clyde robbed banks in America during the Great Depression and breathed life into a society in desperate need of some kind of sideshow or distraction-story or folk-tale to get their minds off what was really depressing America --- complete financial worry.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were real criminals and were pursued by real lawmen, but their daring deeds seemed to fill a void in the American landscape, a sociocultural need to use storytelling to make sense of all kinds of dystopian madness, and their actual real-life romance reflected an American aesthetic towards drama, which is exactly what director Arthur Penn managed to capture in this timeless film about theft, displacement, fear, romance, journalism, style, violence, tragedy, and of course, depression.

This is truly an achievement in American film-making, and it deserves nothing less than 5/5 stars, and I'd argue it should be raised to the level of dioramic films such as Ben-Hur (William Wyler), It's a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra), Annie Hall (Woody Allen), Michael Clayton (Tony Gilroy), and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper).



====

Because Penn's film captures all the living drama of both bank robbery and societal defiance, the art for the film and poster for the film have been circulated and re-circulated around the globe, making it an image and stamp of true film-making pride.

bc1.jpg


Penn chose to give the film a very stripped-down and rustic look while offering the characterization and storytelling flow a very landscape-rich color and texture. This is both a street-wise story and an aesthetic experiment. The scenes of robbery and getaway, adventure and tragedy, and fortune and violence reflect Americans' love of cinema, colors, and cadence.

bc2.jpg


Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were romanticized in the press during the Great Depression in America as being a very iconic if unusual couple, a real daring duo, and Penn's film captures the magnetism between the two thieves in the story/movie in a way that Beatty and Dunaway manage to create and cast with great dynamic flair!

bc5.jpg


The cinematography in Bonnie and Clyde make this a truly outstanding Blu-ray HD film experience as well, for anyone who boasts such home-entertainment luxuries!

bc6.jpg


The image-stills from the production of this film have become historical treasures for movie-buffs as well as more romantic historians who seek to understand and appreciate the weight behind historical revisionism. Was the Great Depression an experience in endurance or an experience in lifestyle re-invention?

bc3.jpg


This is also a terrific movie for anyone in love with the storytelling and folklore surrounding bank robbery. Sure, there've been many entertaining bank robbery and heist films over the years, some portraying real-life robbers and featuring legendary/popular actors, including Heat (Al Pacino), Bloody Mama (Robert DeNiro), Killing Zoe (Eric Stoltz), Heist (Gene Hackman), Ocean's Eleven (Frank Sinatra), Out of Sight (George Clooney), and Inside Man (Denzel Washington), but what sets apart Bonnie and Clyde is its sheer presentation of cinematic diarism.

bc4.jpg


The car-chase scene(s) in Bonnie and Clyde are not to be missed and represent an old-world cinema aesthetic, which can definitely be separated from a new era aesthetic catering to more mechanical designs (e.g., John Frankenheimer's 1998 understated masterpiece Ronin).

bc7.jpg


BONNIE: Your advertising is dandy. Folks'd just never guess you don't have a thing to sell.

CLYDE: You could find a lover boy on every corner in town and it doesn't make a damn to them whether you're waiting on tables or picking cotton, so long as you cooperate.

BONNIE: Why?

CLYDE: We can be somethin' we could never be alone.

====


"Money is everything" (Ecclesiastes)
 

okfine

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The iconic American historicultural film Bonnie and Clyde (Arthur Penn), starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway and featuring a stellar supporting cast has become a worldwide gem, capturing all the social drama and romance surrounding the canonization and deification of the two legendary real-life American bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Bonnie and Clyde robbed banks in America during the Great Depression and breathed life into a society in desperate need of some kind of sideshow or distraction-story or folk-tale to get their minds off what was really depressing America --- complete financial worry.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were real criminals and were pursued by real lawmen, but their daring deeds seemed to fill a void in the American landscape, a sociocultural need to use storytelling to make sense of all kinds of dystopian madness, and their actual real-life romance reflected an American aesthetic towards drama, which is exactly what director Arthur Penn managed to capture in this timeless film about theft, displacement, fear, romance, journalism, style, violence, tragedy, and of course, depression.

This is truly an achievement in American film-making, and it deserves nothing less than 5/5 stars, and I'd argue it should be raised to the level of dioramic films such as Ben-Hur (William Wyler), It's a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra), Annie Hall (Woody Allen), Michael Clayton (Tony Gilroy), and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper).



====

Because Penn's film captures all the living drama of both bank robbery and societal defiance, the art for the film and poster for the film have been circulated and re-circulated around the globe, making it an image and stamp of true film-making pride.

View attachment 401542

Penn chose to give the film a very stripped-down and rustic look while offering the characterization and storytelling flow a very landscape-rich color and texture. This is both a street-wise story and an aesthetic experiment. The scenes of robbery and getaway, adventure and tragedy, and fortune and violence reflect Americans' love of cinema, colors, and cadence.

View attachment 401543

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were romanticized in the press during the Great Depression in America as being a very iconic if unusual couple, a real daring duo, and Penn's film captures the magnetism between the two thieves in the story/movie in a way that Beatty and Dunaway manage to create and cast with great dynamic flair!

View attachment 401544

The cinematography in Bonnie and Clyde make this a truly outstanding Blu-ray HD film experience as well, for anyone who boasts such home-entertainment luxuries!

View attachment 401545

The image-stills from the production of this film have become historical treasures for movie-buffs as well as more romantic historians who seek to understand and appreciate the weight behind historical revisionism. Was the Great Depression an experience in endurance or an experience in lifestyle re-invention?

View attachment 401546

This is also a terrific movie for anyone in love with the storytelling and folklore surrounding bank robbery. Sure, there've been many entertaining bank robbery and heist films over the years, some portraying real-life robbers and featuring legendary/popular actors, including Heat (Al Pacino), Bloody Mama (Robert DeNiro), Killing Zoe (Eric Stoltz), Heist (Gene Hackman), Ocean's Eleven (Frank Sinatra), Out of Sight (George Clooney), and Inside Man (Denzel Washington), but what sets apart Bonnie and Clyde is its sheer presentation of cinematic diarism.

View attachment 401547

The car-chase scene(s) in Bonnie and Clyde are not to be missed and represent an old-world cinema aesthetic, which can definitely be separated from a new era aesthetic catering to more mechanical designs (e.g., John Frankenheimer's 1998 understated masterpiece Ronin).

View attachment 401548

BONNIE: Your advertising is dandy. Folks'd just never guess you don't have a thing to sell.

CLYDE: You could find a lover boy on every corner in town and it doesn't make a damn to them whether you're waiting on tables or picking cotton, so long as you cooperate.

BONNIE: Why?

CLYDE: We can be somethin' we could never be alone.

====


"Money is everything" (Ecclesiastes)
I snuck in to the Carriage Square Theater in Oxnard to see that movie. Good post.
 

JGalt

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Once again we see leftists idolizing vicious killers.
Hey asshole, what is your problem?

No, seriously. The worst ones are those Tarrantino movies that always seemed to be produced by Harvey Weinstein. We have enough young armed thugs walking the streets, without the entertainment industry creating more. In addition, how many kids have died or accidentally killed others, thanks to Hollywood's depiction of irresponsible firearms use and a total lack of gun safety?

Crime and punishment is not a matter to be taken lightly: People get killed, lives are ruined, and the bad guy seldom really gets away it. My Great Uncle was a Federal Marshal down in Nevada County, Arkansas, back in the thirties. They got a phone call that Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker were headed that way, and were going to pass through town.

Long story short, my Great Uncle and several other deputies set up a road block on the highway coming into town. A couple hours later, a car came speeding down the road and didn't slow down as it approached the roadblock. The officers opened up on the car, riddling it with bullets, and it crashed into a ditch. In the car were three women, two of them died.

True story. And thanks to the OP for starting a thread that didn't have anything to do with the Supreme Court nominee hearings. I'm getting burned out on it already, just take the vote, ok?
 
Last edited:

Rambunctious

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I read the interview that Blanche Barrow gave after she was released from custody....fascinating....

 

Race Burley

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The iconic American historicultural film Bonnie and Clyde (Arthur Penn), starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway and featuring a stellar supporting cast has become a worldwide gem, capturing all the social drama and romance surrounding the canonization and deification of the two legendary real-life American bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Bonnie and Clyde robbed banks in America during the Great Depression and breathed life into a society in desperate need of some kind of sideshow or distraction-story or folk-tale to get their minds off what was really depressing America --- complete financial worry.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were real criminals and were pursued by real lawmen, but their daring deeds seemed to fill a void in the American landscape, a sociocultural need to use storytelling to make sense of all kinds of dystopian madness, and their actual real-life romance reflected an American aesthetic towards drama, which is exactly what director Arthur Penn managed to capture in this timeless film about theft, displacement, fear, romance, journalism, style, violence, tragedy, and of course, depression.

This is truly an achievement in American film-making, and it deserves nothing less than 5/5 stars, and I'd argue it should be raised to the level of dioramic films such as Ben-Hur (William Wyler), It's a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra), Annie Hall (Woody Allen), Michael Clayton (Tony Gilroy), and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper).



====

Because Penn's film captures all the living drama of both bank robbery and societal defiance, the art for the film and poster for the film have been circulated and re-circulated around the globe, making it an image and stamp of true film-making pride.

View attachment 401542

Penn chose to give the film a very stripped-down and rustic look while offering the characterization and storytelling flow a very landscape-rich color and texture. This is both a street-wise story and an aesthetic experiment. The scenes of robbery and getaway, adventure and tragedy, and fortune and violence reflect Americans' love of cinema, colors, and cadence.

View attachment 401543

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were romanticized in the press during the Great Depression in America as being a very iconic if unusual couple, a real daring duo, and Penn's film captures the magnetism between the two thieves in the story/movie in a way that Beatty and Dunaway manage to create and cast with great dynamic flair!

View attachment 401544

The cinematography in Bonnie and Clyde make this a truly outstanding Blu-ray HD film experience as well, for anyone who boasts such home-entertainment luxuries!

View attachment 401545

The image-stills from the production of this film have become historical treasures for movie-buffs as well as more romantic historians who seek to understand and appreciate the weight behind historical revisionism. Was the Great Depression an experience in endurance or an experience in lifestyle re-invention?

View attachment 401546

This is also a terrific movie for anyone in love with the storytelling and folklore surrounding bank robbery. Sure, there've been many entertaining bank robbery and heist films over the years, some portraying real-life robbers and featuring legendary/popular actors, including Heat (Al Pacino), Bloody Mama (Robert DeNiro), Killing Zoe (Eric Stoltz), Heist (Gene Hackman), Ocean's Eleven (Frank Sinatra), Out of Sight (George Clooney), and Inside Man (Denzel Washington), but what sets apart Bonnie and Clyde is its sheer presentation of cinematic diarism.

View attachment 401547

The car-chase scene(s) in Bonnie and Clyde are not to be missed and represent an old-world cinema aesthetic, which can definitely be separated from a new era aesthetic catering to more mechanical designs (e.g., John Frankenheimer's 1998 understated masterpiece Ronin).

View attachment 401548

BONNIE: Your advertising is dandy. Folks'd just never guess you don't have a thing to sell.

CLYDE: You could find a lover boy on every corner in town and it doesn't make a damn to them whether you're waiting on tables or picking cotton, so long as you cooperate.

BONNIE: Why?

CLYDE: We can be somethin' we could never be alone.

====


"Money is everything" (Ecclesiastes)
I snuck in to the Carriage Square Theater in Oxnard to see that movie. Good post.
Not surprised that you're a thief.
 

Meathead

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The iconic American historicultural film Bonnie and Clyde (Arthur Penn), starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway and featuring a stellar supporting cast has become a worldwide gem, capturing all the social drama and romance surrounding the canonization and deification of the two legendary real-life American bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Bonnie and Clyde robbed banks in America during the Great Depression and breathed life into a society in desperate need of some kind of sideshow or distraction-story or folk-tale to get their minds off what was really depressing America --- complete financial worry.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were real criminals and were pursued by real lawmen, but their daring deeds seemed to fill a void in the American landscape, a sociocultural need to use storytelling to make sense of all kinds of dystopian madness, and their actual real-life romance reflected an American aesthetic towards drama, which is exactly what director Arthur Penn managed to capture in this timeless film about theft, displacement, fear, romance, journalism, style, violence, tragedy, and of course, depression.

This is truly an achievement in American film-making, and it deserves nothing less than 5/5 stars, and I'd argue it should be raised to the level of dioramic films such as Ben-Hur (William Wyler), It's a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra), Annie Hall (Woody Allen), Michael Clayton (Tony Gilroy), and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper).



====

Because Penn's film captures all the living drama of both bank robbery and societal defiance, the art for the film and poster for the film have been circulated and re-circulated around the globe, making it an image and stamp of true film-making pride.

View attachment 401542

Penn chose to give the film a very stripped-down and rustic look while offering the characterization and storytelling flow a very landscape-rich color and texture. This is both a street-wise story and an aesthetic experiment. The scenes of robbery and getaway, adventure and tragedy, and fortune and violence reflect Americans' love of cinema, colors, and cadence.

View attachment 401543

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were romanticized in the press during the Great Depression in America as being a very iconic if unusual couple, a real daring duo, and Penn's film captures the magnetism between the two thieves in the story/movie in a way that Beatty and Dunaway manage to create and cast with great dynamic flair!

View attachment 401544

The cinematography in Bonnie and Clyde make this a truly outstanding Blu-ray HD film experience as well, for anyone who boasts such home-entertainment luxuries!

View attachment 401545

The image-stills from the production of this film have become historical treasures for movie-buffs as well as more romantic historians who seek to understand and appreciate the weight behind historical revisionism. Was the Great Depression an experience in endurance or an experience in lifestyle re-invention?

View attachment 401546

This is also a terrific movie for anyone in love with the storytelling and folklore surrounding bank robbery. Sure, there've been many entertaining bank robbery and heist films over the years, some portraying real-life robbers and featuring legendary/popular actors, including Heat (Al Pacino), Bloody Mama (Robert DeNiro), Killing Zoe (Eric Stoltz), Heist (Gene Hackman), Ocean's Eleven (Frank Sinatra), Out of Sight (George Clooney), and Inside Man (Denzel Washington), but what sets apart Bonnie and Clyde is its sheer presentation of cinematic diarism.

View attachment 401547

The car-chase scene(s) in Bonnie and Clyde are not to be missed and represent an old-world cinema aesthetic, which can definitely be separated from a new era aesthetic catering to more mechanical designs (e.g., John Frankenheimer's 1998 understated masterpiece Ronin).

View attachment 401548

BONNIE: Your advertising is dandy. Folks'd just never guess you don't have a thing to sell.

CLYDE: You could find a lover boy on every corner in town and it doesn't make a damn to them whether you're waiting on tables or picking cotton, so long as you cooperate.

BONNIE: Why?

CLYDE: We can be somethin' we could never be alone.

====


"Money is everything" (Ecclesiastes)
Good movie, but more highly embellished than Cleopatra.
 

TroglocratsRdumb

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Compelling story.
Good Actors.
Great cast. Warren Betty, Faye Dunaway, Michael Pollard, Gene Hackman, Gene Wilder, Denver Pyle
Great Academy Award winning Movie.
Buuuut it kind of whitewashed Bonnie and Clyde's crimes.
They were vicious killers.
They murdered people after they had robbed them and they murdered LEOs.
 

John T. Ford

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Once again we see leftists idolizing vicious killers.
I agree.

In reality, Bonnie and Clyde were two of the most vicious disgusting murderers in this Country's history.

But, ..... no one has ever accused our psycho Leftist friends of living in reality.
 

John T. Ford

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Compelling story.
Good Actors.
Great cast. Warren Betty, Faye Dunaway, Michael Pollard, Gene Hackman, Gene Wilder, Denver Pyle
Great Academy Award winning Movie.
Buuuut it kind of whitewashed Bonnie and Clyde's crimes.
They were vicious killers.
They murdered people after they had robbed them and they murdered LEOs.
I thought the Highwaymen was a better depiction.

 

harmonica

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1. it's nothing like Ben Hur
2. they were murderers
 

jwoodie

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A great movie. By contemporary standards, it might be criticized for authenticity: Bonnie and Clyde did not look like movie stars.
 

Picaro

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A fantasy movie, barely 'historical' but I liked the old cars and Pollard and Dub Taylor were great, probably the best performances in the movie. Beatty was much better in Bugsy, and as for Depressing Era gangster movies Dillinger with Warren Oates was a lot better and loaded with great actors as well.
 

whitehall

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The 1934 NYT account gushes about a "carefully laid death trap". Hollywood managed to romanticize the two year crime spree of the notorious couple but I guess everybody forgot to question the Constitutionality of laying out a "death trap". Texas Rangers used every type of firepower except an air strike to take down the couple before they had a chance to put up a fight. Was it legal?
 

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