CDZ Big government in Texas makes America less competitive

Toronado3800

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
 

bear513

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Name a place you can go in the world with out setting you up with some type of disaster, from hurricanes / typhoons,to super volcanos like Yellowstone, to earth quakes ( one of the biggest ones on record was in Illinois) to a damn asteroid landing on you ..

.
 
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Toronado3800

Toronado3800

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Name a place you can go in the world with out setting you up with some type of disaster, from hurricanes / typhoons,to super volcanos like Yellowstone, to earth quakes ( one of the biggest ones on record was in Illinois) to a damn asteroid landing on you ..

.
Somewhat true and I do walk outside w/o my meteorite protection umbrella lol.

But,

Do not use a single event disaster to lessen the importance of learning some places are just on active fault lines or New Orleans has obsolete civic planning or its costly to put ppl in the middle of the desert vs the middle of Kentucky.

In many ways I think we do things as a country so we can compete with the Chinese and maintain economic dominance. Poor civic planning makes us less competitive......probably something like building a house with no insulation now because its cheaper initially. In the long term not having insulation is going to cost you money. Buying people out of disaster prone zones is going to cost a little money and leave us with parks in unusual places. It will keep our great great grandchildren from having to maintain costly infrastructure though.
 

oldsoul

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Name a place you can go in the world with out setting you up with some type of disaster, from hurricanes / typhoons,to super volcanos like Yellowstone, to earth quakes ( one of the biggest ones on record was in Illinois) to a damn asteroid landing on you ..

.
Somewhat true and I do walk outside w/o my meteorite protection umbrella lol.

But,

Do not use a single event disaster to lessen the importance of learning some places are just on active fault lines or New Orleans has obsolete civic planning or its costly to put ppl in the middle of the desert vs the middle of Kentucky.

In many ways I think we do things as a country so we can compete with the Chinese and maintain economic dominance. Poor civic planning makes us less competitive......probably something like building a house with no insulation now because its cheaper initially. In the long term not having insulation is going to cost you money. Buying people out of disaster prone zones is going to cost a little money and leave us with parks in unusual places. It will keep our great great grandchildren from having to maintain costly infrastructure though.
I agree. It really comes down to a cost-benefit analysis for me. We need ports in good locations, San Fran. comes to mind. However, with today's infrastructure technology, do we really need large metro areas to support them in immediate proximity? In some cases we likely do. In some, the proximity of housing, shopping, industry, etc. is far less important. In those cases, when the inevitable disaster occurs, would it not be prudent, as a society, to move what we can to safer ground? Preserve history by moving the structures, and preserve human life by re-building in a safer location that is less prone to disasters.

Take New Orleans as an example. When the next hurricane/flood strikes (and it's a question of when, not if) and the city is effectively destroyed, would it make more sense to move the structures that are of historical importance and rebuild somewhere else (like maybe ABOVE sea level?), or should we just endlessly rebuild in the same spot that, inevitably, WILL flood again (it's below sea level, and next to a flood prone river too)?
 

bear513

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Name a place you can go in the world with out setting you up with some type of disaster, from hurricanes / typhoons,to super volcanos like Yellowstone, to earth quakes ( one of the biggest ones on record was in Illinois) to a damn asteroid landing on you ..

.
Somewhat true and I do walk outside w/o my meteorite protection umbrella lol.

But,

Do not use a single event disaster to lessen the importance of learning some places are just on active fault lines or New Orleans has obsolete civic planning or its costly to put ppl in the middle of the desert vs the middle of Kentucky.

In many ways I think we do things as a country so we can compete with the Chinese and maintain economic dominance. Poor civic planning makes us less competitive......probably something like building a house with no insulation now because its cheaper initially. In the long term not having insulation is going to cost you money. Buying people out of disaster prone zones is going to cost a little money and leave us with parks in unusual places. It will keep our great great grandchildren from having to maintain costly infrastructure though.

Chinese are building or built huge cities that no one lives in. So what?
 
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Toronado3800

Toronado3800

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Name a place you can go in the world with out setting you up with some type of disaster, from hurricanes / typhoons,to super volcanos like Yellowstone, to earth quakes ( one of the biggest ones on record was in Illinois) to a damn asteroid landing on you ..

.
Somewhat true and I do walk outside w/o my meteorite protection umbrella lol.

But,

Do not use a single event disaster to lessen the importance of learning some places are just on active fault lines or New Orleans has obsolete civic planning or its costly to put ppl in the middle of the desert vs the middle of Kentucky.

In many ways I think we do things as a country so we can compete with the Chinese and maintain economic dominance. Poor civic planning makes us less competitive......probably something like building a house with no insulation now because its cheaper initially. In the long term not having insulation is going to cost you money. Buying people out of disaster prone zones is going to cost a little money and leave us with parks in unusual places. It will keep our great great grandchildren from having to maintain costly infrastructure though.

Chinese are building or built huge cities that no one lives in. So what?
What does that have to do with us being less efficient? If we see them make mistakes offer advice like we would to a neighbor and let them.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Name a place you can go in the world with out setting you up with some type of disaster, from hurricanes / typhoons,to super volcanos like Yellowstone, to earth quakes ( one of the biggest ones on record was in Illinois) to a damn asteroid landing on you ..

.
Somewhat true and I do walk outside w/o my meteorite protection umbrella lol.

But,

Do not use a single event disaster to lessen the importance of learning some places are just on active fault lines or New Orleans has obsolete civic planning or its costly to put ppl in the middle of the desert vs the middle of Kentucky.

In many ways I think we do things as a country so we can compete with the Chinese and maintain economic dominance. Poor civic planning makes us less competitive......probably something like building a house with no insulation now because its cheaper initially. In the long term not having insulation is going to cost you money. Buying people out of disaster prone zones is going to cost a little money and leave us with parks in unusual places. It will keep our great great grandchildren from having to maintain costly infrastructure though.
I agree. It really comes down to a cost-benefit analysis for me. We need ports in good locations, San Fran. comes to mind. However, with today's infrastructure technology, do we really need large metro areas to support them in immediate proximity? In some cases we likely do. In some, the proximity of housing, shopping, industry, etc. is far less important. In those cases, when the inevitable disaster occurs, would it not be prudent, as a society, to move what we can to safer ground? Preserve history by moving the structures, and preserve human life by re-building in a safer location that is less prone to disasters.

Take New Orleans as an example. When the next hurricane/flood strikes (and it's a question of when, not if) and the city is effectively destroyed, would it make more sense to move the structures that are of historical importance and rebuild somewhere else (like maybe ABOVE sea level?), or should we just endlessly rebuild in the same spot that, inevitably, WILL flood again (it's below sea level, and next to a flood prone river too)?
The old N.O. doesnt flood it's all the newer areas that have been built in flood planes.
They knew better back in the day.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
Walking distance from water in Houston?
 
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Toronado3800

Toronado3800

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
Walking distance from water in Houston?
How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
Walking distance from water in Houston?
How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
Harvey was a once in a thousand year flood.
Harvey is a 1,000-year flood event unprecedented in scale
 
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Toronado3800

Toronado3800

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
Walking distance from water in Houston?
How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
Harvey was a once in a thousand year flood.
Harvey is a 1,000-year flood event unprecedented in scale
Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem because more people will watch.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
Walking distance from water in Houston?
How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
Harvey was a once in a thousand year flood.
Harvey is a 1,000-year flood event unprecedented in scale
Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem becau se more people will watch.
There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
 
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Toronado3800

Toronado3800

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$2.5 billion Harris County Proposition A flood bond approved

So what I'm reading here is folks in Houston have signed up to make America less competitive by using big government taxes to fight mother nature instead of using knowledge to build their homes the right way in the right places.

Full disclosure. I live in Missouri where we very much do the same embarrassing thing. So, I can recognize problems other places that we have here. Next thing you know some big government President will approve money to rebuild New Orleans!

This isn't 1875, we have Roman technology and don't need to build homes within walking distance of the river.

What can be done to discourage this type of thing? We are not Japan or Belgium. We have a large country with many perfectly fine places to build homes and businesses and we should take advantage of it instead of setting ourselves up for repeated disasters.
Walking distance from water in Houston?
How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
Harvey was a once in a thousand year flood.
Harvey is a 1,000-year flood event unprecedented in scale
Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem becau se more people will watch.
There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Walking distance from water in Houston?
How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
Harvey was a once in a thousand year flood.
Harvey is a 1,000-year flood event unprecedented in scale
Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem becau se more people will watch.
There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
 
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Toronado3800

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How about just build where the public doesn't need to give your subdivision welfare to exist safely if my prose was too flowery.
Harvey was a once in a thousand year flood.
Harvey is a 1,000-year flood event unprecedented in scale
Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem becau se more people will watch.
There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem becau se more people will watch.
There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
The dams dont cover 43 square miles,they provide 43 square miles of water retainment.
Houston is the fourth largest city in America and has the largest foreign port in the U.S.
You think we should abandon that port?
 
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Toronado3800

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Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

2013
This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

2012
"100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

2015
https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem becau se more people will watch.
There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
The dams dont cover 43 square miles,they provide 43 square miles of water retainment.
Houston is the fourth largest city in America and has the largest foreign port in the U.S.
You think we should abandon that port?
Nope I don't think we should abandon the port. Like Donald would say, if it makes us money keep doing it.

I think them dams are quite the undertaking and the land they protect is more costly to develop than land that just happens to be up the hill. Not to mention when one fails its going to create tragic instances where children die because of the ignorance or mistakes of their parents.

Me, I'd just want to recollect on their parent's rescue.

In St Louis should we abandon the river front? No.

People just don't need to live within walking distance or a horse ride of the river front though. I suspect Houston is largely the same. Also we've shown how building levees raises the rivers elsewhere and speeds up flooding thus pushing the cost of our poor development choices onto others.

Buy outs not 1,000 years protection is my motto. Let's spur the home construction industry for everyone who wants to work.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
Shit happens no matter where you live.
Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
The dams dont cover 43 square miles,they provide 43 square miles of water retainment.
Houston is the fourth largest city in America and has the largest foreign port in the U.S.
You think we should abandon that port?
Nope I don't think we should abandon the port. Like Donald would say, if it makes us money keep doing it.

I think them dams are quite the undertaking and the land they protect is more costly to develop than land that just happens to be up the hill. Not to mention when one fails its going to create tragic instances where children die because of the ignorance or mistakes of their parents.

Me, I'd just want to recollect on their parent's rescue.

In St Louis should we abandon the river front? No.

People just don't need to live within walking distance or a horse ride of the river front though. I suspect Houston is largely the same. Also we've shown how building levees raises the rivers elsewhere and speeds up flooding thus pushing the cost of our poor development choices onto others.

Buy outs not 1,000 years protection is my motto. Let's spur the home construction industry for everyone who wants to work.
You dont seem to understand the manner in which Houston floods.
There's no rushing waters it's a slow climb.
And again there are no rivers or lakes near Houston.
We have Buffalo bayou and thats it.
 
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Toronado3800

Toronado3800

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Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
The dams dont cover 43 square miles,they provide 43 square miles of water retainment.
Houston is the fourth largest city in America and has the largest foreign port in the U.S.
You think we should abandon that port?
Nope I don't think we should abandon the port. Like Donald would say, if it makes us money keep doing it.

I think them dams are quite the undertaking and the land they protect is more costly to develop than land that just happens to be up the hill. Not to mention when one fails its going to create tragic instances where children die because of the ignorance or mistakes of their parents.

Me, I'd just want to recollect on their parent's rescue.

In St Louis should we abandon the river front? No.

People just don't need to live within walking distance or a horse ride of the river front though. I suspect Houston is largely the same. Also we've shown how building levees raises the rivers elsewhere and speeds up flooding thus pushing the cost of our poor development choices onto others.

Buy outs not 1,000 years protection is my motto. Let's spur the home construction industry for everyone who wants to work.
You dont seem to understand the manner in which Houston floods.
There's no rushing waters it's a slow climb.
And again there are no rivers or lakes near Houston.
We have Buffalo bayou and thats it.
So there is no point in spending that money retaining them 43 square miles of water because its slow and peaceable?
 

oldsoul

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Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
What do you think the dams are?
Which they've been upgrading.

These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
The dams dont cover 43 square miles,they provide 43 square miles of water retainment.
Houston is the fourth largest city in America and has the largest foreign port in the U.S.
You think we should abandon that port?
Nope I don't think we should abandon the port. Like Donald would say, if it makes us money keep doing it.

I think them dams are quite the undertaking and the land they protect is more costly to develop than land that just happens to be up the hill. Not to mention when one fails its going to create tragic instances where children die because of the ignorance or mistakes of their parents.

Me, I'd just want to recollect on their parent's rescue.

In St Louis should we abandon the river front? No.

People just don't need to live within walking distance or a horse ride of the river front though. I suspect Houston is largely the same. Also we've shown how building levees raises the rivers elsewhere and speeds up flooding thus pushing the cost of our poor development choices onto others.

Buy outs not 1,000 years protection is my motto. Let's spur the home construction industry for everyone who wants to work.
You dont seem to understand the manner in which Houston floods.
There's no rushing waters it's a slow climb.
And again there are no rivers or lakes near Houston.
We have Buffalo bayou and thats it.
The manner in which Houston floods is irrelevant to the point here. Let's remove all of the specifics and see if we can come to an understanding here.

There is a fictional city (we'll call it "Megatown" for ease of reference) you don't live in, and have no connection to, because it's fictional. This city is in an area that, history has shown, is prone to a certain type of disaster. The current reaction to said disaster is to rebuild, with Federal tax dollars in part. What the OP is suggesting is, why don't we just move Megatown to a different site, just a few miles away, where the area is less prone to disasters? Of course it's not quite that easy, because, in most cases, that new site would be owned by someone(s). Let's just say, for argument's sake, that in the case of Megatown, there is a piece of federal land 20 miles away, that is roughly the same size, has usable topography, and has little chance of experiencing a natural disaster. Would you be in favor of looking into the idea of moving the city instead of rebuilding?
 

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