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Alabama Business Leaders Say New Immigration Law is Bad for Business

Toro

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An Alabama law to tackle illegal immigration is coming under fire from some business leaders in the state, who say the measure is undermining Alabama's economy even before it takes effect.

Representatives of agribusiness, the state's biggest industry, and sectors such as construction, which is charged with rebuilding the tornado-hit city of Tuscaloosa, are reporting worker shortages because of immigrants already fleeing the state. The state agriculture commission says squash, tomatoes and other produce are rotting in the fields.

"We have a big problem on our hands," said Brett Hall, the state's deputy commissioner for agriculture and industry. "Farmers and business people could go under."

Their experiences mirror those of business leaders and farmers in Georgia, who have complained that a similar law signed in May in their state is driving away immigrant workers vital to farming, poultry, restaurants and other businesses in the state. ...

James Latham, chief executive of WAR Construction Inc. in Tuscaloosa, expressed concern about the impact of the exodus on reconstructing the tornado-ravaged region.

"We are seeing smaller crews, and work taking longer to get accomplished, due to less available workers," said Mr. Latham, who is also president of Alabama Associated General Contractors. ...

Instead of expanding his peach farm and adjacent jam and basket-weaving factory, "I'm closing down on Sept. 1," said Hal Hayes of Clanton, Ala.

Echoing a point raised by farmers in other states, Mr. Hayes said that a handful of Americans who showed up to apply for jobs demanded that he pay them off the books so that they can continue to collect unemployment benefits.

Mr. Hayes, who has farmed for more than three decades, said, "We are going to lay everybody off and I am going to draw unemployment because the state put me out of business."

Alabama Immigrant Law Irks Business - WSJ.com
 

SW2SILVER

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Bullsh*t. Those people that hire illegal aliens DESERVE to fail. They are cutting corners, and they aren't helping Americans in their own community. The ones that hire illegals SHOULD crash & burn. Shame on you people for having the nerve of asking for any sympathy from Americans given the record number of unemployed Americans. I would just tell them: SHUT UP!
 

waltky

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Granny says, "Dat's right - states got right to regulate immigration within state borders when federal law falls short, is non-existent or unenforced...
:cool:
Judge lets key parts of Alabama immigration law stand
28 Sept.`11 : – A federal judge refused Wednesday to block key parts of a closely watched Alabama law that is considered the strictest state effort to clamp down on illegal immigration, including a measure that requires immigration status checks of public school students.
U.S. District Judge Sharon Blackburn, appointed by Republican President George H.W. Bush, wrote in her 115-page opinion that some parts of the law are in conflict with federal statutes, but others aren't. She said federal law doesn't prohibit checking students or suspects pulled over by police. She also refused to stop provisions that allow police to hold suspected illegal immigrants without bond; bar state courts from enforcing contracts involving illegal immigrants; make it a felony for an illegal immigrant to do business with the state; and make it a misdemeanor for an illegal resident not to have immigration papers.

She didn't say when those and other parts of the law could take effect, but her previous order blocking enforcement expires on Thursday. Neither Gov. Robert Bentley nor Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange had any immediate comment on when the state would begin enforcing parts of the law. Blackburn's order temporarily blocked four parts of the law until she can issue a final ruling. Those measures would:

•Make it a crime for an illegal immigrant to solicit work.

•Make it a crime to transport or harbor an illegal immigrant.

•Allow discrimination lawsuits against companies that dismiss legal workers while hiring illegal immigrants.

•Forbid businesses from taking tax deductions for wages paid to workers who are in the country illegally.

Blackburn heard arguments from opponents including the Obama administration, immigrant-support groups and civil libertarians before it was supposed to take effect Sept. 1. The Justice Department contended the state law encroaches on the federal government's duty to enforce immigration law, and other opponents argued it violated basic rights to free speech and travel. She put the entire law on hold last month, but didn't rule on whether it was constitutional, saying she needed more time.

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Shogun

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Maybe the wages for such labor increase as to entice workers of the legal variety. That IS how this shit is supposed to work, right?
 

William Joyce

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Bullsh*t. Those people that hire illegal aliens DESERVE to fail. They are cutting corners, and they aren't helping Americans in their own community. The ones that hire illegals SHOULD crash & burn. Shame on you people for having the nerve of asking for any sympathy from Americans given the record number of unemployed Americans. I would just tell them: SHUT UP!

Amen.

People ask me, "Well, do you want to pay $5 for a head of lettuce?"

I tell them, yes. Yes I do.
 

del

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A federal judge on Wednesday upheld most of the sections of Alabama’s far-reaching immigration law that had been challenged by the Obama administration, including portions that had been blocked in other states.


The decision, by Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn of Federal District Court in Birmingham, makes it much more likely that the fate of the recent flurry of state laws against illegal immigration will eventually be decided by the Supreme Court.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/29/u...l=1&adxnnlx=1317275226-eoLEGbTdc3JPbeBJ7SwL2w
 

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