'A Protocol for Dying'

midcan5

liberal / progressive
Jun 4, 2007
12,753
3,526
260
America
People often act surprised when I tell them I want to know I am dying and have a bit of time before lights out. I have known religious people who fear death and I wonder why? If immortality is real then these people are set for a very long time. Of course nothing follows life, but consciousness will have nothing of it. Excellent read below from a dying man.

"I am so grateful not to have died suddenly. I'm so grateful I won't lose my mind."

"My dad chose this, and died on Easter Tuesday. Several of us his family were with him. It is a simple and peaceful process. One injection sent him to sleep, into a coma. The second stopped his heart. It was a good way to die, and though I didn't know I was sick then, one I already wanted.

I'm shocked that in 2016 few countries allow this, and enforce the barbaric torture of decay and failure. It's especially relevant for cancer, which is a primary cause of death. Find a moment in your own jurisdiction, if it bans euthanasia, to lobby for the right to die in dignity."

A Protocol for Dying - Hintjens.com

"Nothing saves anyone’s life. It just postpones their death." Alan Bennett
 
This is quite wonderful. My friend, Craig died two years ago and he prepared very well for it, a great comfort to his many friends. All his family had passed away.
 
Euthanasia or suicide isn't a good practice for Buddhists. There is a meditation where one learns to eject the consciousness.
 
People often act surprised when I tell them I want to know I am dying and have a bit of time before lights out. I have known religious people who fear death and I wonder why? If immortality is real then these people are set for a very long time. Of course nothing follows life, but consciousness will have nothing of it. Excellent read below from a dying man.

"I am so grateful not to have died suddenly. I'm so grateful I won't lose my mind."

"My dad chose this, and died on Easter Tuesday. Several of us his family were with him. It is a simple and peaceful process. One injection sent him to sleep, into a coma. The second stopped his heart. It was a good way to die, and though I didn't know I was sick then, one I already wanted.

I'm shocked that in 2016 few countries allow this, and enforce the barbaric torture of decay and failure. It's especially relevant for cancer, which is a primary cause of death. Find a moment in your own jurisdiction, if it bans euthanasia, to lobby for the right to die in dignity."

A Protocol for Dying - Hintjens.com

"Nothing saves anyone’s life. It just postpones their death." Alan Bennett
My mom just died. She battled Alzheimer's for over 5 years. We wouldn't have given her the lethal cocktail until about 3 weeks ago.

But she would have taken it herself much sooner. What she did the last 5 years wasn't living. But I wouldn't have wanted her to take it even a month ago.

But a month or even 4 years ago I would have been happy if she passed away in her sleep because again, that's not living.

Until they stop eating and walking, we're going to keep them alive. It'd be cruel to starve them, right. And if they want to die, stop eating. No ones going to force feed them.

In fact I accused the hospital of force feeding her in the middle of the night. There was this feeding thing in her room and I didn't think her roommate used a feeding tube. At $400 a day I can see why they want them to keep living
 

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