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94% of the universe’s galaxies are permanently beyond our reach

Fort Fun Indiana

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94%? Well that sucks. So we can only visit about 12 billion galaxies.

Eventually that 94% of galaxies will disappear over the horizon like a sailboat.

Keep in mind: this is a snapshot, if we were ale to leave today at the speed of light. The percentage of galaxies we can never visit grows by the minute. If we just sit here long enough, there will be no galaxies in the sky, save for our own. (And then Hubble would lose the Great Debate!)

  • The universe is expanding, with every galaxy beyond the Local Group speeding away from us.
  • Today, most of the universe's galaxies are already receding faster than the speed of light.
  • All galaxies currently beyond 18 billion light-years are forever unreachable by us, no matter how much time passes.
 

Anomalism

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This is assuming it's not possible to move faster than the speed of light, and perhaps it's not, but do we really know that for absolute certain? Maybe it's possible to tear holes in spacetime and pop into another section of the universe or something, or maybe not.
 
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White 6

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94%? Well that sucks. So we can only visit about 12 billion galaxies.

Eventually that 94% of galaxies will disappear over the horizon like a sailboat.

Keep in mind: this is a snapshot, if we were ale to leave today at the speed of light. The percentage of galaxies we can never visit grows by the minute. If we just sit here long enough, there will be no galaxies in the sky, save for our own. (And then Hubble would lose the Great Debate!)

  • The universe is expanding, with every galaxy beyond the Local Group speeding away from us.
  • Today, most of the universe's galaxies are already receding faster than the speed of light.
  • All galaxies currently beyond 18 billion light-years are forever unreachable by us, no matter how much time passes.
During the lifetimes of you and me, 100% of the galaxies beyond our own cannot and will not be able to be visited.
 

theHawk

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94%? Well that sucks. So we can only visit about 12 billion galaxies.

Eventually that 94% of galaxies will disappear over the horizon like a sailboat.

Keep in mind: this is a snapshot, if we were ale to leave today at the speed of light. The percentage of galaxies we can never visit grows by the minute. If we just sit here long enough, there will be no galaxies in the sky, save for our own. (And then Hubble would lose the Great Debate!)

  • The universe is expanding, with every galaxy beyond the Local Group speeding away from us.
  • Today, most of the universe's galaxies are already receding faster than the speed of light.
  • All galaxies currently beyond 18 billion light-years are forever unreachable by us, no matter how much time passes.
Yea? So?
 

SweetSue92

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94%? Well that sucks. So we can only visit about 12 billion galaxies.

Eventually that 94% of galaxies will disappear over the horizon like a sailboat.

Keep in mind: this is a snapshot, if we were ale to leave today at the speed of light. The percentage of galaxies we can never visit grows by the minute. If we just sit here long enough, there will be no galaxies in the sky, save for our own. (And then Hubble would lose the Great Debate!)

  • The universe is expanding, with every galaxy beyond the Local Group speeding away from us.
  • Today, most of the universe's galaxies are already receding faster than the speed of light.
  • All galaxies currently beyond 18 billion light-years are forever unreachable by us, no matter how much time passes.

I'm a space geek, but only an armchair one. I love space documentaries. What is striking is: the more astrophysicists, etc discover, the less they really understand. Like what you mention. Space is not only expanding, but it is expanding at an ever increasing rate.

That's just one aspect of space they seem to understand less. Which is fascinating really

They basically tapdance all around God. Which is also fascinating. And funny
 

Relative Ethics

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At 52 I doubt I will see the time when many people will travel to Space -- even Earth's orbit.
 

Relative Ethics

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This is assuming it's not possible to move faster than the speed of light, and perhaps it's not, but do we really know that for absolute certain? Maybe it's possible to tear holes in spacetime and pop into another section of the universe or something, or maybe not.
I hope so. Hopefully you will see much more then our generation.
 

james bond

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We need a reason to visit.
 

frigidweirdo

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94%? Well that sucks. So we can only visit about 12 billion galaxies.

Eventually that 94% of galaxies will disappear over the horizon like a sailboat.

Keep in mind: this is a snapshot, if we were ale to leave today at the speed of light. The percentage of galaxies we can never visit grows by the minute. If we just sit here long enough, there will be no galaxies in the sky, save for our own. (And then Hubble would lose the Great Debate!)

  • The universe is expanding, with every galaxy beyond the Local Group speeding away from us.
  • Today, most of the universe's galaxies are already receding faster than the speed of light.
  • All galaxies currently beyond 18 billion light-years are forever unreachable by us, no matter how much time passes.

Unless of course the universe starts retracting in on itself again.
 

Batcat

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This is assuming it's not possible to move faster than the speed of light, and perhaps it's not, but do we really know that for absolute certain? Maybe it's possible to tear holes in spacetime and pop into another section of the universe or something, or maybe not.
We always assume we know more about physics than we actually do.


***snip***

Light​

3_462522305


It is a seemingly well-known fact that the speed of light cannot be breached in our universe, but that has been outright proven wrong by researchers from NEC Research Institute in Princeton, US. They passed a laser beam through a chamber of specially prepared gas and clocked its time. As it turned out, the beam was observed to be 300 times faster than the speed of light. Incredibly, the beam exited the chamber before it had entered it, which appears to violate the law of cause and effect as theorized by Einstein. It is like seeing the TV turn on before you press the switch on your remote. But then again, as the researchers explain, that law is not technically being broken, as the beam of the future has no means to affect the conditions in the past, which proves that Einstein wasn’t wrong, after all. Wrong or not, the experiment still managed to prove that the light speed barrier can in fact be broken and that effect can precede cause.


Is NASA really working on . . . a warp drive? An internal feasibility reportsuggests the agency might be, or at least that the idea of traveling through folded space is part of the NASA interstellar spaceflight menu.

The space agency isn’t building an engine that can approach the speed of light—yet. In the report, advanced propulsion physicist Harold "Sonny" White, PhD, now of Limitless Space, resolves a major paradox in the leading theoretical model for superluminal (faster than the speed of light) travel, what’s known as an Alcubierre warp drive.

The colloquial term “warp drive” comes from science fiction, most famously Star Trek. The faster-than-light warp drive of the Federation works by colliding matter and antimatter and converting the explosive energy to propulsion. The show suggests that this extraordinary power alone pushes the ship at faster-than-light speeds.

The Alcubierre drive, first proposed by theoretical physicist Miguel Alcubierre, conforms to Einstein’s theory of general relativity to achieve superluminal travel. It works a bit like the classic “tablecloth and dishes” party trick: The spaceship sits atop the tablecloth of spacetime, the drive pulls the fabric around it, and the ship is situated in a new place relative to the fabric.



***snip***


We all know the Enterprise travels at warp speed. Will it ever be possible to travel at “warp factor 4”?


We physicists used to laugh at Star Trek‘s warp factor. We don’t laugh anymore. About 10 years ago, a Mexican relativist named Miguel Alcubierre was watching Star Trek, and he came up with a new solution to Einstein’s [general relativity] equation. The loophole is negative matter — Einstein never considered it. And Alcubierre got a solution that looked very similar to warp drive. The key is, you don’t go to the stars, the stars come to you. Everybody assumes you have to go to the stars, which means you have to break the light barrier and violate the laws of physics. But you can compress the space like an accordion — compress the space between you and the stars. It’s like a wrinkle in space. There are some objections to this, of course. We don’t have negative matter, for instance. But in principle, if you have, let’s say, a meteorite made of negative matter, then it may be possible. Einstein never said that nothing can go faster than light. Empty space can contract or expand faster than the speed of light. That’s the Big Bang. It’s emptiness that expanded. It looks very similar to the rendition of warp drive in the movies — you would see distortion of star light, stars would come at you very fast, but inside you feel nothing.
 

Quasar44

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Fort Fun Indiana
Hummm
Any star system within 50 light years can be obtainable next century

You simply use laser beams that have digitally encoded humans . Before hand , you launch a vast army of AI nano bots to nearby Star clusters to construct bases to receive the laser beams and construct human clones

Star Trek is just movies
 

Quasar44

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We may never ever get to galaxies
If we can conquer hundreds of Star systems in our own galaxy then what more can anyone want
 

there4eyeM

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The most important aspect of this kind of knowledge is how clearly it demonstrates how juvenile human concepts of existence remain. Despite seeing the enormity and complexity of the universe, childish wishes and dreams continue to handicap our race.
 

frigidweirdo

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We always assume we know more about physics than we actually do.


***snip***

Light​

3_462522305


It is a seemingly well-known fact that the speed of light cannot be breached in our universe, but that has been outright proven wrong by researchers from NEC Research Institute in Princeton, US. They passed a laser beam through a chamber of specially prepared gas and clocked its time. As it turned out, the beam was observed to be 300 times faster than the speed of light. Incredibly, the beam exited the chamber before it had entered it, which appears to violate the law of cause and effect as theorized by Einstein. It is like seeing the TV turn on before you press the switch on your remote. But then again, as the researchers explain, that law is not technically being broken, as the beam of the future has no means to affect the conditions in the past, which proves that Einstein wasn’t wrong, after all. Wrong or not, the experiment still managed to prove that the light speed barrier can in fact be broken and that effect can precede cause.


Is NASA really working on . . . a warp drive? An internal feasibility reportsuggests the agency might be, or at least that the idea of traveling through folded space is part of the NASA interstellar spaceflight menu.

The space agency isn’t building an engine that can approach the speed of light—yet. In the report, advanced propulsion physicist Harold "Sonny" White, PhD, now of Limitless Space, resolves a major paradox in the leading theoretical model for superluminal (faster than the speed of light) travel, what’s known as an Alcubierre warp drive.

The colloquial term “warp drive” comes from science fiction, most famously Star Trek. The faster-than-light warp drive of the Federation works by colliding matter and antimatter and converting the explosive energy to propulsion. The show suggests that this extraordinary power alone pushes the ship at faster-than-light speeds.

The Alcubierre drive, first proposed by theoretical physicist Miguel Alcubierre, conforms to Einstein’s theory of general relativity to achieve superluminal travel. It works a bit like the classic “tablecloth and dishes” party trick: The spaceship sits atop the tablecloth of spacetime, the drive pulls the fabric around it, and the ship is situated in a new place relative to the fabric.



***snip***


We all know the Enterprise travels at warp speed. Will it ever be possible to travel at “warp factor 4”?

We physicists used to laugh at Star Trek‘s warp factor. We don’t laugh anymore. About 10 years ago, a Mexican relativist named Miguel Alcubierre was watching Star Trek, and he came up with a new solution to Einstein’s [general relativity] equation. The loophole is negative matter — Einstein never considered it. And Alcubierre got a solution that looked very similar to warp drive. The key is, you don’t go to the stars, the stars come to you. Everybody assumes you have to go to the stars, which means you have to break the light barrier and violate the laws of physics. But you can compress the space like an accordion — compress the space between you and the stars. It’s like a wrinkle in space. There are some objections to this, of course. We don’t have negative matter, for instance. But in principle, if you have, let’s say, a meteorite made of negative matter, then it may be possible. Einstein never said that nothing can go faster than light. Empty space can contract or expand faster than the speed of light. That’s the Big Bang. It’s emptiness that expanded. It looks very similar to the rendition of warp drive in the movies — you would see distortion of star light, stars would come at you very fast, but inside you feel nothing.

Oh, I've had people tell me all sorts of things they KNOW are true. But which no one actually knows. Like about the Big Bang, which we know almost nothing, but we speculate about. Someone once even told me there could only be one "universe" because the word "universe" means only one. I told him the word "multiverse" also exists which, based on his logic, means there are multiple universes.
 

abu afak

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In fact, right now 100% of the Stars beyond our sun are unreachable by us any time soon.
At current rates, the closest star, Proxima Centauri (app a mere 4 Light Years) would take 73,000 years to reach.
A fact a little more graspable but still breathtaking.
Wonderful as it was, Star Trek gave us false hopes.
`
 
OP
Fort Fun Indiana

Fort Fun Indiana

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I'm a space geek, but only an armchair one. I love space documentaries. What is striking is: the more astrophysicists, etc discover, the less they really understand. Like what you mention. Space is not only expanding, but it is expanding at an ever increasing rate.

That's just one aspect of space they seem to understand less. Which is fascinating really

They basically tapdance all around God. Which is also fascinating. And funny
Because there is no place for magical nonsense in science. Inherently. Scientists study ubder the assumptions of determinism and universal physical laws. There is no space for magic there.

But you are free to point at anythi g they learn and say, "God did it!" Of course, you will have explained nothing at all, nor can any useful predictions be drawn from your hypothesis. So it is useless in science.
 
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Fort Fun Indiana

Fort Fun Indiana

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Fort Fun Indiana
Hummm
Any star system within 50 light years can be obtainable next century

You simply use laser beams that have digitally encoded humans . Before hand , you launch a vast army of AI nano bots to nearby Star clusters to construct bases to receive the laser beams and construct human clones

Star Trek is just movies
That is covered. You can shine a laser at every galaxy we can observe. 94% of them, as of right now, will never see that laser.
 

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