Towards A Better Understanding Of The Churchill Progression

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by bitterlyclingin, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. bitterlyclingin
    Offline

    bitterlyclingin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,095
    Thanks Received:
    418
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Ratings:
    +466
    ("Its good for a young man of twenty to be a Liberal because it proves he has a heart. But its equally bad for that same young man at fourty to not be a Conservative, because it proves he has no brain."
    A mouse's genes are almost the same as the humans, the biggest difference between the two species is in the gene modulators, those non gene portions of the genetic code that determine how those genes will be expressed. Its good to know mRNA activity increases later in life. Hmmm, brain dead Liberals? Yupp! That pretty much explains #OWS!)

    "Human brains all work pretty much the same and use roughly the same genes in the same way to build and maintain the infrastructure that makes people who they are, two new studies show. And by charting the brain’s genetic activity from before birth to old age, the studies reveal that the brain continually remodels itself in predictable ways throughout life.

    In addition to uncovering details of how the brain grows and ages, the results may help scientists better understand what goes awry in brain disorders such as schizophrenia and autism.

    “The complexity is mind-numbing,” says neuroscientist Stephen Ginsberg of the Nathan Kline Institute and New York University Langone Medical Center, who wasn’t involved in the studies. “It puts the brain in rarefied air.”

    In the studies, published in the Oct. 27 Nature, researchers focused not on DNA — virtually every cell’s raw genetic material is identical — but on when, where and for how long each gene is turned on over the course of a person’s life. To do this, the researchers measured levels of mRNA, a molecule whose appearance marks one of the first steps in executing the orders contained in a gene, in postmortem samples of donated brains that ranged in age from weeks after conception to old age.

    Both studies found lots of variation in gene behavior at different life stages, but one particular period stood out: The prenatal brain had massive changes in gene activity. Many genes there were pumping out big quantities of mRNA, and this production abruptly slowed after birth. “Prenatally, things are changing faster than they change at any other time,” says Carlo Colantuoni of the Lieber Institute for Brain Development at Johns Hopkins University Medical Center, and coauthor on one paper. “Things are happening fast in there.”

    Kleinman and his colleagues turned up a curious finding: Many of the genes that slow down right after birth show a surge of activity as a person gets older. “The biggest changes that are going on occur fetally,” he says. “And then they drop off until mid-life, and then in the 50s to 70s, expression changes pick up again and become quite dramatic.” "


    Brain Gene Activity Changes Through Life - Science News
     
  2. bitterlyclingin
    Offline

    bitterlyclingin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,095
    Thanks Received:
    418
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Ratings:
    +466
    And the "Lady GaGa' phenomena.
     
  3. edthecynic
    Offline

    edthecynic Censored for Cynicism

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2008
    Messages:
    29,861
    Thanks Received:
    3,497
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Ratings:
    +7,638
    Gee, what a surprise! NOT!

    A whole CON$ervative diatribe built on a phony quotation!
     
  4. bitterlyclingin
    Offline

    bitterlyclingin Silver Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    3,095
    Thanks Received:
    418
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Ratings:
    +466
    The reported rise in mRNA activity late in life and the increase in brain remodeling is notable and remarkable. Unfortunately some of those undergoing the process of remodeling venture off onto some horrific physiologic wrong turn, then collapse into an Alzheimer's vegetative state and are gone forever, and then there are those like Churchill who wonderfully enriched our language and marvelously perfected the ability to fight WWII on a quart of Scotch a day after undergoing remodeling. The wonders of natural selection on display. Then there are those like Bob Beckel, Democratic strategist on Fox New's "The Five" whose early life was so rife with drugs of abuse and recreational drugs, his cellular remodeling process was apparently halted in its tracks, frozen by some as yet undiscovered LSD/cannabis/cocaine/morphinergic derived formaldehyde process, remaining in a permanently Democratic vegetative state, forever eating, sleeping, defecating, micturating, and copulating.
     
  5. JimBowie1958
    Offline

    JimBowie1958 Old Fogey

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    47,542
    Thanks Received:
    7,209
    Trophy Points:
    1,870
    Location:
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Ratings:
    +31,309
    Seems to me that some of the Western worlds finest leaders were heavy drinkers at some time in their adult life.

    I sometimes think that the destruction of brain cells done by alcohol might contribute to their brain remaining more able to 'think outside the box', but I am probably wrong.

    Just seems like a poetic karmic kind if thing, lol.
     
  6. editec
    Offline

    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    41,426
    Thanks Received:
    5,595
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +5,630
    The more I know about Churchill the less impressed I am with the guy.
     

Share This Page