The Science of Russia's New Silent Sniper Rifle

Discussion in 'Military' started by OsteInmar, Sep 2, 2018.

  1. OsteInmar
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    OsteInmar Active Member

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    Once a year, giants of the Russian arms industry gather outside Moscow to show off their latest technology and display their vision for the future of human warfare at the Russia's Army Expo.....

    The Science of Russia's New Silent Sniper Rifle
     
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  2. night_son
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    night_son Gold Member

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    Nice.

    However silent they make it, engineers just can't mask that "Oh, some one is shooting at me. Shit!" sound of a bullet sizzle-snap speeding over your head, particularly in humid, damp morning air.
     
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  3. whitehall
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    whitehall Platinum Member

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    If a sniper does his job you never hear the shot anyway.
     
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  4. 9thIDdoc
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    9thIDdoc Gold Member

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    "The makers told Russian state newspaper TASS that the new rifle is not only lethal out to 300 meters (985 feet)..."

    Oh please! A good bow and arrow is lethal further than that and very quiet. Marksmen were making lethal shots longer than that during the American Revolution and the War of 1812 with flintlock rifles and Civil War snipers were making called head shots at that range and their max effective range was around 800 yds. Lewis and Clark on their exploratory expedition took along an air rifle of large caliber that they hunted game with and was said to be quiet. And let us not forget that that 300 mtrs is the manufactures claim. You don't think they might stretch the truth do you? I don't know how quiet it is but that is a long way from being "a sniper rifle".
     
  5. OsteInmar
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    OsteInmar Active Member

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    As I understand it, the advantage of this rifle is that the speed of the bullet is less than the speed of sound, but it has a huge lethal force and does not have the sound of a shot.
    I'm not a military man or a physicist, maybe I'm wrong.
     
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  6. night_son
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    night_son Gold Member

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    I believe the primary function of the rifle is quieter, close to medium range target neutralization with the higher lethality of a large caliber, wide wound channel, low probability for over penetration capability. What I read into it is hostage taker neutralization with a lower chance for collateral damage, CQB designated marksman use, and close range, high-caliber precision DM support in a densely populated urban environment. In other words: it's a highly specialized weapon. Theoretically, in .50 the weapon could also be used for anti-material purposes such as back-up for taking out enemy aircraft still on the ground or for detonating fuel or ammo caches.

    The British used something similar during WW2 in the bolt action De Lisle Carbine. This weapon type definitely fits a specific role and useful role on the modern battlefield.
     
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  7. 9thIDdoc
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    9thIDdoc Gold Member

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    No. You are talking about a weapon not a great deal more powerful than the 1911 .45 cal pistol which fires a projectile only 0.05" (aprox.) smaller.at almost as much velocity. The lower the velocity, the lower the penetration (in aircraft as well as flesh) and lethality and the more rainbow-like the trajectory making precision more difficult.
    I have considerable experience with .50 cal. weapons as I have used muzzle-loading rifles in that caliber to harvest several deer and other game. I have been careful to limit my shots to 100yds or less. Below the speed of sound the projectiles are just not that powerful.
     
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  8. night_son
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    night_son Gold Member

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    I disagree. The caliber in question is a 12.7x55mm round capable of pushing up to a 1000 plus grain bullet at subsonic and supersonic velocities, depending on the load. I hand cast and hand load for a variety of modern and antique cased calibers, and I will tell you, from personal experience, that increasing bullet weight at low velocities can and does make up for loss of speed born energy in the kinetic increase in energy from a heavier projectile. The Russians are well known for producing hardened jackets and conical nose insert penetrators as well as saboted tungsten darts capable penetrating personal body armor at intermediate ranges.

    Speaking to the anti-material role of the caliber, I am certain the Russians have mastered the design of rounds, such as the SLAP, DU, incendiary and HE rounds we've developed.

    I also have personal experience with the .50 as an assistant M2 gunner on an M113 APC, primarily.

    As far as black powder goes, you very likely know more about it than me. My experience is limited to rare firings of inherited muzzle loading weapons, and Civil War reenactments after which we'd load up some live rounds with our leftover newspaper cartridges and shoot at my grandfather's old wooden pick up truck topper he'd dumped in the woods behind his house. I do remember a .44 ball out of a replica revolver going through both sides of the wood, which was about 1/4 inch thick. As for the velocity of those rounds, I couldn't tell you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
  9. westwall
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    westwall Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    There is an amazing amount of hyperbole in the article. Suppressing rifles is no big deal. i have had suppressors for my Steyr SSG PII for over 20 years. i just bought a Yankee Hill Titanium suppressor for my FN-FAL. Building a suppressor for a .50 cal is not a big deal either, it just has to be large to handle the gasses being produced.

    I shoot a .50 cal in ultra long range competitions (1500 plus yards) and to hit anything at that range you have to be pushing the bullet very fast because the second the projectile drops out of supersonic you have no idea where it is going to impact. A suppressed .50 cal of 1000 grains, and low velocity, is not going to be a very good anti material weapon as it won't penetrate deep enough to do anything to the interior. Even packing it with HE will do little more than scratch the paint on a light armored or hardened target. Sure it will blow the hell out of soft skinned stuff, but so does everything else.
     
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    Last edited: Sep 5, 2018
  10. 9thIDdoc
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    9thIDdoc Gold Member

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    I also am also familiar with the M-2 .50 cal. BMG and have a little experience with it's use in combat,
    upload_2018-9-5_14-4-2.png

    upload_2018-9-5_14-7-0.png
    upload_2018-9-5_14-9-32.png
     
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