The right way to assess teachers' performance?

Discussion in 'Education' started by IanC, Jun 22, 2010.

  1. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    washingtonpost.com


    what do you think? reasonable conditions for teachers to assessed (and paid!) on their students' scores?
     
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  2. random3434
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    random3434 Senior Member

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    I love this, and would love to see it implemented. As a teacher of special needs kids, most of my students can't pass the standardized tests, but our school is still punished for it because of NCLB. Now, showing IMPROVEMENT for these, and other low achieving students, is a more realistic goal. I had a third grade boy in my classroom in November who would tell me "I can't do it" -he couldn't even write "cat" on a piece of paper. I had him writing a few sentences by March. (He has a 53 IQ and has to take the standardized tests) This is what I should be doing instead of teaching to a "test" that has no bearing on what these kids need to learn in school right now.
     
  3. Gremlin-USA
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    Gremlin-USA <<< Me in 1970

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    The Teachers pay and/or bonuses should be based on how well they Teach, not based on when a student is absent or sent out of class for bad behavior.

    .
     
  4. Gem
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    Gem BANNED

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    There are some definite strengths in these suggestions...and some definite weaknesses, in my opinion.

    On the basis of judging teachers based on their students' progress from when they enter my classroom to when they leave it - rather than a "grade-level" blanket assessment is, I believe, an absolutely critical step towards accurately judging whether a teacher has been successful or not.

    But to state that we should simply "not count" absent students, or that we can "remove" students who are disruptive, that students who don't come at the appropriate knowledge level will be removed or held back is a fantasy and certainly not long-term strategies. In fact, in the case of "holding a student back," its also been proven to be entirely unsuccessful in terms of student achievement in its current forms.

    So...yes - I agree with the fact that if I'm going to be judged based upon my students performance I want to make sure that they are judging the students who show up ready and willing to learn. And, I want the assessment to show how far they have come from the start of the school year until now. But...unless we are truthful about the current realities of the classroom (we can't just ignore absent, uninterested and/or unprepared students)...then I feel that these suggestions are simply lip-service.
     
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  5. Gem
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    Gem BANNED

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    Here is an example of why I think that people who do not work in education are perhaps, less able to judge how a teacher's "value" should be assessed.

    So the teacher who teaches math, English, science and social studies to a class of 10-15 emotionally disturbed middle-school students who are below grade level and who frequently swear, throw things, have tantrums, etc. deserves the same salary as the teacher who teaches honors level English to a class of 8-12 well-behaved, intelligent, eager to learn students working above grade level?

    By your assertion, if both teachers manage to bring their students 1 grade level ahead of where they were in the beginning of the school year then they deserve the same salary. But I would argue that this simplification overlooks the complications and additional requirements of the 1st teachers job that the 2nd teacher will never experience.
     
  6. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I'm with Echo, these are reasonable criteria regarding measurable results. Kids that do not attend class regularly are not being influenced/taught by the teacher.

    Kids who have developmental problems should be considered via improvements, not grade level.

    Serious behavior issues keep the many from learning. This past year I had a 6th grader who barked during class-yes, woof, woof and growled. With a reprimand he'd stop for less than a minute. He also picked his nose and announced his findings, each and every time. His IQ has tested repeatedly at above 160. He does not belong in regular classroom. Not fair to the other 17 kids in the class. This was in a parochial school.
     
  7. bodecea
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    bodecea Diamond Member

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    How do you measure that?
     
  8. bodecea
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    bodecea Diamond Member

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    Those are pretty unrealistic numbers. My daughter's school district has contractual obligations of no more than 32 to a class except for PE which is 45 per class.

    My brother's old school district had no contractual limit. He was involved with the planning of a new science wing and each room had 32 build in seats....he pointed out that wasn't enough...he was assured it would never be more than that...from day one when that wing opened, he has had from 40-45 per class...the others sit on the counters. And before he retired, he had to run labs with burners, knives etc. And this was a fairly well off district in Silicon Valley.
     
  9. ConHog
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    The first thing that needs to be done is drop the stupid standardized testing. We have teacher after teacher telling us that they can't teach the material they need to teach while at the same time teaching for a test.

    Let teachers teach at whatever pace is dictated by the kids in the class. it's laughable to think that a teacher who teaches 3 Biology classes every day with say 25 kids in it is going to be able to keep all 3 classes at the same pace. Seventy five kids are not going to learn at the same pace no matter how good the teacher is.

    Next, there HAS to be a dual track education system employed. Children who have no interest in learning should not be in classes with kids who are striving to be the best, it's not fair to anyone. Either the "lesser" child gets left behind or the "better" student is limited. let's join the civilized world and admit that some kids are just not ever going to be college material. There is no shame in that, we need blue collar workers to. This eliminates a teacher being "punished" because some of their students aren't living up to some artificial expectations.

    Schools need more ability to fire under performing teachers. It can take literally years and cost tens of thousands of dollars to fire a teacher, so most schools don't bother, they simply convince the teacher to move onto some other district.

    How can we seriously pass all the blame onto teachers when all we here is "you better not punish my little Johnnie?" In my day we knew two things. 1. if you screwed up, you would get your ass paddled and 2. if you got paddled at school, dad would wear your ass out at home. Our school does use corporal punishment, but only with parental permission. Most parents refuse.

    Extra curricular activities need to recognized as privileges , not rights. most states have a 2.0 GPA requirement to take part in sports and such. What a joke. who can't make a 2.0? Our school has a 3.0 minimum AND if you have more than one C you're suspended from whatever extracurricular activity is your pleasure.

    Frankly, teacher's unions need to go away. They serve little to no purpose today, except to cost schools millions of dollars in ridiculous court cases every year.

    This may sound cruel , but in some situations a school should not be obligated to "educate" a child. Our school has a $10M budget, and $1M of that is used to pay for the "education" of a single student. This student honestly has no need for the educational opportunity. She's 10 years old , is a quadriplegic , can hardly read, or make herself understand needs breathing therapy and our school has to provide her with both her own personal transportation to and from school, but both a licensed teacher and a licensed nurse dedicated solely to HER all day long every day and a private room at the school. How can a small school afford that? One tenth of our yearly budget for what? I'm sorry, but the compassionate, logical, reasonable thing to do is to hire one person who is qualified to assist this child and have them do so at her home.


    Just to start
     
  10. psikeyhackr
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    psikeyhackr VIP Member

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    We now have $300 netbooks with 160 gigabyte drives.

    The entire years curruculum can be loaded onto a netbook. We should give the kids debit cards so they can pay THE TEACHER OFTHEIR CHOICE for whatever help they need. There should be testing days once a month where the kids can demand their next level of tests on their subject. The testing should be completely separate from the teachers. The teachers shouldn't even know the results besides what was the last level that the kid passed.

    So the teaches that can teach will attract the kids that want to learn. The teachers that can't teach won't get any kids.

    Alexei Panshin's Rite of Passage

    Citizen of the Galaxy by Heinlein reviewed

    psik
     

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