WTC building 7

LA RAM FAN

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jet fuel can't melt steel beams

... but it can heat it enough to weaken it's structural integrity.

FACT: Jet fuel burns at 800° to 1500°F, not hot enough to melt steel (2750°F). However, experts agree that for the towers to collapse, their steel frames didn't need to melt, they just had to lose some of their structural strength, which requires much less heat.

New York deputy fire chief Vincent Dunn said:
"I have never seen melted steel in a building fire,But I've seen a lot of twisted, warped, bent and sagging steel. What happens is that the steel tries to expand at both ends, but when it can no longer expand, it sags and the surrounding concrete cracks."
"Steel loses about 50 percent of its strength at 1100°F," notes senior engineer Farid Alfawak-hiri of the American Institute of Steel Construction. "And at 1800° it is probably at less than 10 percent." NIST also believes that a great deal of the spray-on fireproofing insulation was likely knocked off the steel beams that were in the path of the crashing jets, leaving the metal more vulnerable to the heat.
jet fuel can't melt steel beams

... but it can heat it enough to weaken it's structural integrity.

FACT: Jet fuel burns at 800° to 1500°F, not hot enough to melt steel (2750°F). However, experts agree that for the towers to collapse, their steel frames didn't need to melt, they just had to lose some of their structural strength, which requires much less heat.

New York deputy fire chief Vincent Dunn said:
"I have never seen melted steel in a building fire,But I've seen a lot of twisted, warped, bent and sagging steel. What happens is that the steel tries to expand at both ends, but when it can no longer expand, it sags and the surrounding concrete cracks."
"Steel loses about 50 percent of its strength at 1100°F," notes senior engineer Farid Alfawak-hiri of the American Institute of Steel Construction. "And at 1800° it is probably at less than 10 percent." NIST also believes that a great deal of the spray-on fireproofing insulation was likely knocked off the steel beams that were in the path of the crashing jets, leaving the metal more vulnerable to the heat.
there was no jet fuel in building 7
bld 7 is the crux of the 9/11 coverup commission this troll and nobody else can get around.LOL
 

Fort Fun Indiana

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jet fuel can't melt steel beams

... but it can heat it enough to weaken it's structural integrity.

FACT: Jet fuel burns at 800° to 1500°F, not hot enough to melt steel (2750°F). However, experts agree that for the towers to collapse, their steel frames didn't need to melt, they just had to lose some of their structural strength, which requires much less heat.

New York deputy fire chief Vincent Dunn said:
"I have never seen melted steel in a building fire,But I've seen a lot of twisted, warped, bent and sagging steel. What happens is that the steel tries to expand at both ends, but when it can no longer expand, it sags and the surrounding concrete cracks."
"Steel loses about 50 percent of its strength at 1100°F," notes senior engineer Farid Alfawak-hiri of the American Institute of Steel Construction. "And at 1800° it is probably at less than 10 percent." NIST also believes that a great deal of the spray-on fireproofing insulation was likely knocked off the steel beams that were in the path of the crashing jets, leaving the metal more vulnerable to the heat.
jet fuel can't melt steel beams

... but it can heat it enough to weaken it's structural integrity.

FACT: Jet fuel burns at 800° to 1500°F, not hot enough to melt steel (2750°F). However, experts agree that for the towers to collapse, their steel frames didn't need to melt, they just had to lose some of their structural strength, which requires much less heat.

New York deputy fire chief Vincent Dunn said:
"I have never seen melted steel in a building fire,But I've seen a lot of twisted, warped, bent and sagging steel. What happens is that the steel tries to expand at both ends, but when it can no longer expand, it sags and the surrounding concrete cracks."
"Steel loses about 50 percent of its strength at 1100°F," notes senior engineer Farid Alfawak-hiri of the American Institute of Steel Construction. "And at 1800° it is probably at less than 10 percent." NIST also believes that a great deal of the spray-on fireproofing insulation was likely knocked off the steel beams that were in the path of the crashing jets, leaving the metal more vulnerable to the heat.
there was no jet fuel in building 7
bld 7 is the crux of the 9/11 coverup commission this troll and nobody else can get around.LOL
Except, all normal people easily got around this embarrassing nonsense long ago....
 

LA RAM FAN

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and one of the shills of Langley is coming here to shit on this thread as instructed by his handlers^
 

irosie91

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jet fuel can't melt steel beams

... but it can heat it enough to weaken it's structural integrity.

FACT: Jet fuel burns at 800° to 1500°F, not hot enough to melt steel (2750°F). However, experts agree that for the towers to collapse, their steel frames didn't need to melt, they just had to lose some of their structural strength, which requires much less heat.

New York deputy fire chief Vincent Dunn said:
"I have never seen melted steel in a building fire,But I've seen a lot of twisted, warped, bent and sagging steel. What happens is that the steel tries to expand at both ends, but when it can no longer expand, it sags and the surrounding concrete cracks."
"Steel loses about 50 percent of its strength at 1100°F," notes senior engineer Farid Alfawak-hiri of the American Institute of Steel Construction. "And at 1800° it is probably at less than 10 percent." NIST also believes that a great deal of the spray-on fireproofing insulation was likely knocked off the steel beams that were in the path of the crashing jets, leaving the metal more vulnerable to the heat.
jet fuel can't melt steel beams

... but it can heat it enough to weaken it's structural integrity.

FACT: Jet fuel burns at 800° to 1500°F, not hot enough to melt steel (2750°F). However, experts agree that for the towers to collapse, their steel frames didn't need to melt, they just had to lose some of their structural strength, which requires much less heat.

New York deputy fire chief Vincent Dunn said:
"I have never seen melted steel in a building fire,But I've seen a lot of twisted, warped, bent and sagging steel. What happens is that the steel tries to expand at both ends, but when it can no longer expand, it sags and the surrounding concrete cracks."
"Steel loses about 50 percent of its strength at 1100°F," notes senior engineer Farid Alfawak-hiri of the American Institute of Steel Construction. "And at 1800° it is probably at less than 10 percent." NIST also believes that a great deal of the spray-on fireproofing insulation was likely knocked off the steel beams that were in the path of the crashing jets, leaving the metal more vulnerable to the heat.
there was no jet fuel in building 7
bld 7 is the crux of the 9/11 coverup commission this troll and nobody else can get around.LOL
I can help you------long ago---I tutored kids who had trouble passing
baby high school Euclidean geometry and ----infantile intro to less than
basic high school physics. I can get the high school diploma for you
 

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