Why it was easy for pagans to become christians

guno

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
 

Penelope

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IS-RA-El equals Israel.

and besides the Hebrews of the OT didn't believe in one God, they just worshipped Yahweh for war.
 

norwegen

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Didn't read the OP. Too long. But the title is right. Pagans converted to Christianity in droves, as did others.

Any wonder that a faith so liberating can spread so quickly?
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
what you said makes no sense.
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
what you said makes no sense.
Oh?
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
Absolutely. After burning their crap and killing them. This did not go down easy. Christianity was a very tiny group and there seems to be this misconception that Christianity grew from the bottom up. It did not. It was a top down religion. Not just for pagans but for other Christians. By including this "it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch" it ignores a couple of centuries of history and implies that everyone just went along for the ride. That didn't happen.
 

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Christianity had countless "convert to our religion or die" moments, similar to to modern extremist Islam...

 

UllysesS.Archer

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
I find it funny, that you teach little about your own religion, but much about others, and how they are wrong, instead of how yours is right.

I guess even you aren't convinced in Judaism. It must pain you greatly, to believe that your forefathers missed their Messiah. Sorry about that.
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
I find it funny, that you teach little about your own religion, but much about others, and how they are wrong, instead of how yours is right.

I guess even you aren't convinced in Judaism. It must pain you greatly, to believe that your forefathers missed their Messiah. Sorry about that.

So what makes Christianity "your" religion? All you do is believe what others want you to believe, worship who others tell you to worship, worship how to others tell you to worship, behave how others want you to behave...

"Your" beliefs are not your own. "Your" mindset, "your" weltanschuung, has little to do with your own True Will and everything to do with those who dominate you in Mind and Spirit. You follow not your own True Will, but theirs. Your religious culture is not your own. All your rituals were created by others. You follow like a sheep and place your Life and destiny in the hands of others. You are compliant. Submissive. Indoctrinated.

 

Coyote

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
Absolutely. After burning their crap and killing them. This did not go down easy. Christianity was a very tiny group and there seems to be this misconception that Christianity grew from the bottom up. It did not. It was a top down religion. Not just for pagans but for other Christians. By including this "it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch" it ignores a couple of centuries of history and implies that everyone just went along for the ride. That didn't happen.
I think they started from the bottom up, but once they gained power - conversion was no longer a choice. It's not unique to Christianity, Islam was similar. Both offered and far better choice than the old ways - redemption, charity, good works, care of orphans and widows, and inclusion - what ever you were before mattered not. Not a bad thing.
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
I find it funny, that you teach little about your own religion, but much about others, and how they are wrong, instead of how yours is right.

I guess even you aren't convinced in Judaism. It must pain you greatly, to believe that your forefathers missed their Messiah. Sorry about that.
Nonsense.

There was no 'messiah,' consequently no one 'missed' anything; it doesn't matter what religion anyone believes in, as all religions are equally false.
 

TheOldSchool

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I think Buddhism is the most noble religion, the Viking religion is the most badass, and Islam is the most currently insane.

And that Christianity and Judaism have become watered down enough over the last couple thousand years to have a place in the modern world. I wonder what the next big religions in the next thousand years will be!
 

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
Absolutely. After burning their crap and killing them. This did not go down easy. Christianity was a very tiny group and there seems to be this misconception that Christianity grew from the bottom up. It did not. It was a top down religion. Not just for pagans but for other Christians. By including this "it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch" it ignores a couple of centuries of history and implies that everyone just went along for the ride. That didn't happen.
I think they started from the bottom up, but once they gained power - conversion was no longer a choice. It's not unique to Christianity, Islam was similar. Both offered and far better choice than the old ways - redemption, charity, good works, care of orphans and widows, and inclusion - what ever you were before mattered not. Not a bad thing.
I disagree. I have to crash. But, when I get up and get some coffee in me then I can write something worthwhile. I just didn't want you think that I was ignoring your post.
 

Disir

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
Absolutely. After burning their crap and killing them. This did not go down easy. Christianity was a very tiny group and there seems to be this misconception that Christianity grew from the bottom up. It did not. It was a top down religion. Not just for pagans but for other Christians. By including this "it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch" it ignores a couple of centuries of history and implies that everyone just went along for the ride. That didn't happen.
I think they started from the bottom up, but once they gained power - conversion was no longer a choice. It's not unique to Christianity, Islam was similar. Both offered and far better choice than the old ways - redemption, charity, good works, care of orphans and widows, and inclusion - what ever you were before mattered not. Not a bad thing.
Can you back that up? You can't have it both ways. You can't have conversion was no longer a choice and inclusion. Unless you mean something different from how I am reading it. There is nothing that I have found that remotely suggests that either Christianity or Islam was a far better choice or that redemption, charity, good works, and social welfare was a new concept or done better.



+
 
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the_human_being

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Who else was there to become a Christian? All were barbarians at some time or another. Believe it or not, even an atheist can become a Christian.
 

Coyote

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
Absolutely. After burning their crap and killing them. This did not go down easy. Christianity was a very tiny group and there seems to be this misconception that Christianity grew from the bottom up. It did not. It was a top down religion. Not just for pagans but for other Christians. By including this "it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch" it ignores a couple of centuries of history and implies that everyone just went along for the ride. That didn't happen.
I think they started from the bottom up, but once they gained power - conversion was no longer a choice. It's not unique to Christianity, Islam was similar. Both offered and far better choice than the old ways - redemption, charity, good works, care of orphans and widows, and inclusion - what ever you were before mattered not. Not a bad thing.
I disagree. I have to crash. But, when I get up and get some coffee in me then I can write something worthwhile. I just didn't want you think that I was ignoring your post.
Ok - you always provide a good discussion :)
 

Coyote

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From earliest times, paganism featured many gods often subsumed beneath or within one apparently greater god. Each tribe or territory had their own god, but as they were subsumed within other tribes by conquest or some other form of domination, their god became subsumed beneath the god of the dominant tribe or nation. Thus there developed pantheons of gods, and yet within the pantheons there was often a hierarchy, and a desire to insist on one hand that the god of the subdued people still existed, and yet on the other hand, an insistence that the god of the dominant group was supreme. When tribes were taken into captivity, or conquerors came and lived in their land, the gods had to somehow be accommodated within a religious system. And so began the idea of 'godheads'. The mysterious, ill defined relationships between the members of the supposed 'Trinity' are very similar to those assumed within the godheads of paganism. Apologists for the Trinity are all divided about the nature of the relationships between Father, Son and Holy Spirit; this is a weak point in the whole idea. And the very same difficulty is encountered by any who would wish to explain or defend the gods within the pagan godheads. Further, it becomes apparent from the literature and sculptured art of early paganism that gods, animals and humans all tend to get mixed up; half-human and half-god. Again, we can see how this came to be reflected in Trinitarian views of the christian man god Jesus.

The idea of a Divine figure coming to earth to redeem the faithful was a very common pagan myth in the Middle East of the first century . It's easy to see how early Christians would've been tempted to claim that Christ was some form of pre-existent God in order to make their beliefs accommodate the surrounding paganism- and it's understandable that some would've been eager to misinterpret Bible passages to this end.

The idea of a 'trinity' of gods was widespread in paganism. The Egyptians had three main gods, Osiris, Isis and Horus. Horus was in turn divided into 3 parts or persons:

Horus - the King
Horus - Ra
Horus - the Scarabaeus.

Likewise the Hindu Vedas of around 1000 BC claimed that one God existed in three forms:

Agni - Fire, presiding over the earth
Indra - the Firmament, presiding over the mid-air
Surya - The Sun. presiding over the Heavens.

In later Hinduism, the 'trimurti' or trinity of gods became:

Brahma - the creative power
Vishnu - the preserving power
Siva - the transforming power.

So when Theophilus, bishop of Antioch introduced the word 'trias' to Christian literature for the first time in 170 CE, and the word 'trinitas' was first used by Tertullian in 200 CE, they were importing pagan concepts which were familiar and had been for millennia.Coupled with virgins having relation with gods as was in their pagan belifes it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch
Burning their shit and killing them made it much moar easy to adapt. It was a top down religion. :/
Along with the wholesale misappropriation of pagan practices and beliefs by Christian proselytizers, making Christianity very familiar to pagans, thus facilitating their conversion.
Absolutely. After burning their crap and killing them. This did not go down easy. Christianity was a very tiny group and there seems to be this misconception that Christianity grew from the bottom up. It did not. It was a top down religion. Not just for pagans but for other Christians. By including this "it wasn't difficult or them to make the switch" it ignores a couple of centuries of history and implies that everyone just went along for the ride. That didn't happen.
I think they started from the bottom up, but once they gained power - conversion was no longer a choice. It's not unique to Christianity, Islam was similar. Both offered and far better choice than the old ways - redemption, charity, good works, care of orphans and widows, and inclusion - what ever you were before mattered not. Not a bad thing.
Can you back that up? You can't have it both ways. You can't have conversion was no longer a choice and inclusion. Unless you mean something different from how I am reading it. There is nothing that I have found that remotely suggests that either Christianity or Islam was a far better choice or that redemption, charity, good works, and social welfare was a new concept or done better.



+
I was reading a biography of Mohammed, and at the beginning of the religion, his big concern was people had drifted away from God and from taking care of the vulnerable in their communities. Instead they focused on ostentatioua displays of largesse, part of the arab culture, widows and orphans were impoverished and marginalized, and he sought to turn that around. Anyone could become a Muslim regardless of their status and his first converts and followers were low status people. It was the same with Jesus, he welcomed the poor, the enslaved, the harlots and he spoke against the greedy wealthy. He emphasized charity, inclusion. I'm not saying that charity, welfare etc is a *new* concept, but it was greatly lacking in the era inwhich they were living.
 

Agit8r

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Christianity borrowed many of its traditions from paganism:

  • Hades (the English word "Hell" comes from Norse "Hel")
  • The offspring of the most high god accomplishing great feats before meeting an agonizing demise (Heracles)
  • Daemons.
  • Many of the teachings attributed to Jesus also appear in the early chapters of Plato's Republic

Just sayin'
 

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