Where Does the Apostle Paul mention "HELL"?

Infallible Arbiter

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Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
 

Ringtone

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I'm not sure what you're asking, but a Christian would have used the term hades when addressing Greek-speaking Gentiles or the term Gehenna when addressing Jews.
 

Meriweather

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Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
Looking at four Bibles I have at hand, "Hades" is not used in any. If you are speaking of Romans 10:6, Paul is saying one doesn't have to travel in to the heavens to find Christ and bring his presence down; nor does he have to travel into the deepest depths to find him and bring his presence up. Rather, Christ's presence is in our hearts, and should be readily in our speech. (I am thinking Paul could have added, "And in our actions".) However Christ in our hearts and in our speech may have also implied actions.
 

harmonica

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Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
why does it matter? there's no heaven-hell-or god --so it's worthless
 
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I'm not sure what you're asking, but a Christian would have used the term hades when addressing Greek-speaking Gentiles or the term Gehenna when addressing Jews.
Reread the post and you'll know what I'm asking, unless you're in cognitive dissonance - "Where did the Apostle Paul mention Hell" (Hades)?
Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
why does it matter? there's no heaven-hell-or god --so it's worthless
I realize you're crying for help.
Don't worry, you're in Hell now - spiritual darkness, with the masses, slowly decomposing (as some measure slowness) on your way to the morgue. Rejoice!!, the talking dead are with you.
 
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Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
Looking at four Bibles I have at hand, "Hades" is not used in any. If you are speaking of Romans 10:6, Paul is saying one doesn't have to travel in to the heavens to find Christ and bring his presence down; nor does he have to travel into the deepest depths to find him and bring his presence up. Rather, Christ's presence is in our hearts, and should be readily in our speech. (I am thinking Paul could have added, "And ino our actions".) However Christ in our hearts and in our speech may have also implied actions.
No.
Paul wrote of Hades once. The translators were inconsistent in the translation and did not place the word "hell" on it like they did elsewhere in the NT, at least with the popular translations. Others placed the word 'grave' or 'death' on it.
It's a big smoking gun to the eternal damnation establishment.
 
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harmonica

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I'm not sure what you're asking, but a Christian would have used the term hades when addressing Greek-speaking Gentiles or the term Gehenna when addressing Jews.
Reread the post and you'll know what I'm asking, unless you're in cognitive dissonance - "Where did the Apostle Paul mention Hell" (Hades)?
Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
why does it matter? there's no heaven-hell-or god --so it's worthless
I realize you're crying for help.
Don't worry, you're in Hell now - spiritual darkness, with the masses, slowly decomposing (as some measure slowness) on your way to the morgue. Rejoice!!, the talking dead are with you.
hahahahhaha
it's like asking about fairytale books....
 

harmonica

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I'm not sure what you're asking, but a Christian would have used the term hades when addressing Greek-speaking Gentiles or the term Gehenna when addressing Jews.
Reread the post and you'll know what I'm asking, unless you're in cognitive dissonance - "Where did the Apostle Paul mention Hell" (Hades)?
Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
why does it matter? there's no heaven-hell-or god --so it's worthless
I realize you're crying for help.
Don't worry, you're in Hell now - spiritual darkness, with the masses, slowly decomposing (as some measure slowness) on your way to the morgue. Rejoice!!, the talking dead are with you.
I'm LOVING it in hell
AHHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAH
 

Meriweather

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why does it matter? there's no heaven-hell-or god --so it's worthless
There are differing opinions on that. Still, let us bring it down to only humanity. Does anyone have to climb the highest mountain or delve into the deepest depths to bring to others what matters most to him/her? Or can they say what is in their hearts?
 

StormAl

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Paul does not mention hell, but does talk about damnation for wrong behavior in Romans.
 

Ringtone

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Reread the post and you'll know what I'm asking, unless you're in cognitive dissonance - "Where did the Apostle Paul mention Hell" (Hades)?

To my knowledge he doesn't, and that's why I wasn't sure what you were asking.

The more interesting question to me is why Paul, more so than any of the other apostles, speaks in the soteriological terms of mercy vs. justice; that is, in this wise, he routinely juxtaposes the children of wrath/darkness and the children of redemption/faith. For Paul, heaven vs. hell is a triviality.
 

Meriweather

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No.
Paul wrote of Hades once. The translators were inconsistent in the translation and did not place the word "hell" on it like they did elsewhere in the NT, at least with the popular translations. Others placed the word 'grave' or 'death' on it.
It's a big smoking gun to the eternal damnation establishment.
The King James translation of 1 Corinthians 15:55: O death, where is thy sting? O grave where is thy victory?
The other translations seem to use 'death' for both questions.

Do you think this may be an indication Paul had no belief in hell?
 
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No.
Paul wrote of Hades once. The translators were inconsistent in the translation and did not place the word "hell" on it like they did elsewhere in the NT, at least with the popular translations. Others placed the word 'grave' or 'death' on it.
It's a big smoking gun to the eternal damnation establishment.
The King James translation of 1 Corinthians 15:55: O death, where is thy sting? O grave where is thy victory?
The other translations seem to use 'death' for both questions.

Do you think this may be an indication Paul had no belief in hell?
You have the verse right.
Paul believed in the spiritual condition of what Hades represents.
The name 'Hell' comes from Norse mythology and did not show up in any translation until 1000 AD in the Anglo Saxon Bible as "helle".

What people have been conditioned to believe about "Hell" today, is a pure abomination to him who is "making all things new" - Rev 21:5
 
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I'm not sure what you're asking, but a Christian would have used the term hades when addressing Greek-speaking Gentiles or the term Gehenna when addressing Jews.
Reread the post and you'll know what I'm asking, unless you're in cognitive dissonance - "Where did the Apostle Paul mention Hell" (Hades)?
Ever notice Apostle Paul never mentioned "HELL"?

More to the point, the Norse name 'Hell' was never transposed on the one and only time Paul mentioned the greek word, "Hades".

Why not?

If you can find the one place Paul used 'Hades', then can you elaborate on the context it's in?
why does it matter? there's no heaven-hell-or god --so it's worthless
I realize you're crying for help.
Don't worry, you're in Hell now - spiritual darkness, with the masses, slowly decomposing (as some measure slowness) on your way to the morgue. Rejoice!!, the talking dead are with you.
I'm LOVING it in hell
AHHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAH
Yup, "they will glory in their shame" -
This mortal has the laughter of a drowning man.
 

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No.
Paul wrote of Hades once. The translators were inconsistent in the translation and did not place the word "hell" on it like they did elsewhere in the NT, at least with the popular translations. Others placed the word 'grave' or 'death' on it.
It's a big smoking gun to the eternal damnation establishment.
The King James translation of 1 Corinthians 15:55: O death, where is thy sting? O grave where is thy victory?
The other translations seem to use 'death' for both questions.

Do you think this may be an indication Paul had no belief in hell?
You have the verse right.
Paul believed in the spiritual condition of what Hades represents.
The name 'Hell' comes from Norse mythology and did not show up in any translation until 1000 AD in the Anglo Saxon Bible as "helle".

What people have been conditioned to believe about "Hell" today, is a pure abomination to him who is "making all things new" - Rev 21:5

So the place of torment discussed in the New Testament of the First Century is the hell of Norse mythology? That's weird.
 

norwegen

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No.
Paul wrote of Hades once. The translators were inconsistent in the translation and did not place the word "hell" on it like they did elsewhere in the NT, at least with the popular translations. Others placed the word 'grave' or 'death' on it.
It's a big smoking gun to the eternal damnation establishment.
The King James translation of 1 Corinthians 15:55: O death, where is thy sting? O grave where is thy victory?
The other translations seem to use 'death' for both questions.

Do you think this may be an indication Paul had no belief in hell?
You have the verse right.
Paul believed in the spiritual condition of what Hades represents.
The name 'Hell' comes from Norse mythology and did not show up in any translation until 1000 AD in the Anglo Saxon Bible as "helle".

What people have been conditioned to believe about "Hell" today, is a pure abomination to him who is "making all things new" - Rev 21:5
Sheol and Hades refer to the unseen, a place of the dead, the grave. Metaphorically, they refer to the objectionable, loathsome, sorrowful, and dreadful (Mt 23:11; Acts 2:27; Rev 20:13-14). They were the resting places of all the buried dead and not a place of punishment.

Tartarus just seems to be the deepest abyss of Hades, which may allude to incarceration or some measure of torment, but not a dark, spiritual underworld ruled by an evil overlord.

The Norse translation is interesting; I didn't know that. But yea, translations were wacky once upon a time. Fortunately people like Robert Young eventually began to transliterate the Hebrew and Greek literally and word-for-word.
 
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No.
Paul wrote of Hades once. The translators were inconsistent in the translation and did not place the word "hell" on it like they did elsewhere in the NT, at least with the popular translations. Others placed the word 'grave' or 'death' on it.
It's a big smoking gun to the eternal damnation establishment.
The King James translation of 1 Corinthians 15:55: O death, where is thy sting? O grave where is thy victory?
The other translations seem to use 'death' for both questions.

Do you think this may be an indication Paul had no belief in hell?
You have the verse right.
Paul believed in the spiritual condition of what Hades represents.
The name 'Hell' comes from Norse mythology and did not show up in any translation until 1000 AD in the Anglo Saxon Bible as "helle".

What people have been conditioned to believe about "Hell" today, is a pure abomination to him who is "making all things new" - Rev 21:5
Sheol and Hades refer to the unseen, a place of the dead, the grave. Metaphorically, they refer to the objectionable, loathsome, sorrowful, and dreadful (Mt 23:11; Acts 2:27; Rev 20:13-14). They were the resting places of all the buried dead and not a place of punishment.

Tartarus just seems to be the deepest abyss of Hades, which may allude to incarceration or some measure of torment, but not a dark, spiritual underworld ruled by an evil overlord.

The Norse translation is interesting; I didn't know that. But yea, translations were wacky once upon a time. Fortunately people like Robert Young eventually began to transliterate the Hebrew and Greek literally and word-for-word.
No one has yet elucidated the context where Paul mentioned Hades. And no one will, it's way too metaphysical for the decomposing mortals here.
 

norwegen

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No one has yet elucidated the context where Paul mentioned Hades. And no one will, it's way too metaphysical for the decomposing mortals here.
Groovy.

The New Testament mentions Hades, but I don't think there is a hell. Generally speaking, the Scriptures seem to say that the wicked simply perish.
 
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No one has yet elucidated the context where Paul mentioned Hades. And no one will, it's way too metaphysical for the decomposing mortals here.
Groovy.

The New Testament mentions Hades, but I don't think there is a hell. The Scriptures seem to say that the wicked simply perish.
Hades is Hell, Hell is Hades, you begin with the spiritual interpretation of who Hades is in greek mythology, not the goofy commentaries you quote.

Everyone is perishing, christians and non-christians, for remaining in metaphysical darkness.

Bill Graham perished and did not reap the life of the ages.
 

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