What are you reading now?

Sunni Man

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For sailing adventure I recommend The Cruise of the Cachalot by Frank Bullen, a young Limey sailor on board a Yankee whaler, free from Gutenberg. Better than Moby Dick. Cachalot is French for sperm whale, their common prey. At least as good as TYBtM and Robinson Crusoe. Less fiction too, I'd say.
I just finished reading the same book, "The Cruse of the Cachalot".
It's a true story written in the late 1800's by the 1st mate of the whaling ship Cachalot that he served on for three years. The first person narrative details how extremely hard and dangerous the work was on a whaling ship.
I really liked his stories about stopping at ports and interacting with the native people of California and various islands in the Pacific.
Written in the english of that time period, it takes a little while to get used to reading it. Also, I know nothing about sailing ships and the nautical names of the large cloth sails and parts of the ship. So I was constantly stopping my reading to look up the word's meaning. It was both educational and annoying, but I did learned a lot. ... :cool:
 
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Shawnee_b

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Cachalot sounds very good! I have read so many sailing stories. One classic I really enjoy? Late 1800's early 19

Joshua Slocum, ("the Spray") Think it is actually titled "Sailing alone around the world" First round the world solo circumnavigation (non fiction). First few words? "no cat, no dog, just me"

One place he stopped and sailed in alone they arrested him. Said no way he could have done it and that he "ate his shipmate" Just an awesome old book.

 

Gdjjr

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Grisham is good...
I like every book of his I've read- I finished this one last night- as with any good fiction writer the door was left open for future stories that will, or could, involve the characters in this one, new and old- in fact, in this one some previous characters are involved-
 

Gdjjr

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I read, before the Grisham book, Me and Sister Bobbie- an insightful look at Willie Nelson and his sister, Bobbie, from their early years to today- Willie says Bobbie is was more musically talented than he is- each chapter is a story from Willies perspective, then the next chapter is Bobbies perspective- interesting inside look at an Icon and his ability to over come obstacles remaining true to himself and care for his family, especially Bobbie, as she was his family and she took care of him when they were kids- easy, and simple reading. I read the whole thing in one (1) day- just under 300 pages.
 

Missourian

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I read quite a lot and I always have since I was in middle school. Seems like I am always engrossed in some star system light years away fighting lizard people, or a time travel adventure or something. Today I started reading Two Years Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana jr. It's about a young man living in the 1830's who becomes ill and has his vision affected and with no medical remedy around, decides to sign up for a two year voyage from Boston to the west coast of the north American continent to load skins to sell. It was a trip for him to recover or die. Fortunately he recovered his vision and went on the write the book.
It's very detailed and tells the reader what daily life aboard the 85 foot Brig "Pilgrim" was like. Below is a recreation of the ship.



According to the book there were about 15 people aboard and they were very busy. They continually had to put up and take down the sails depending on the weather, and had to be on watch around the clock. So the sailors life was one kept busy! They had a compass and maritime chronometer and the ability to sail by the stars. The voyage took two years and is a wonderful tale of adventure on the high seas without all the hollywood hype thrown in. A good read if you are interested in history or sea going vessels of that period.

I figured I should post this to dispel some of the nasty rumors that I "can't read". ;)
Just picked this up from audible on your recommendation. :thup:
 

esme

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A Fairly Honourable Defeat - Iris Murdoch
 

Gdjjr

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Last night I finished Matthew McConaughey's Greenlights- I'll admit to being partial to Texas celebrities stories, so, you can use that to indict me-
I enjoyed it. He's very introspective and has done a lot of livin- I have no way of knowing if he held anything back, but some of his confessions lead me to believe that if he did they weren't very influential to his life-
No, fuck faces, I don't agree with all his thoughts- but, they are his thoughts, not regurgitated talking points-

A couple of reviews:

Unflinchingly honest and remarkably candid, Matthew McConaughey's book invites us to grapple with the lessons of his life as he did- and to see that the point was never to win, but to understand -- Mark Manson, author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck

This one is from the author of The Lincoln Lawyer, Michael Connelly, which is what introduced me to Matthew McConaughey-

A Renaissance man on the big screen, McConaughey shows he is the same on the page. Mystical and spiritual, but mostly just wonderful, Greenlights is an inspired memoir that celebrates the idea that it's the journey rather than the destination that will fulfill us.

Shaka Smart, head coach, men's basketball coach, University of Texas at Austin, had this to say;

Written with great intensity and rare candor, Greenlights is a whirlwind of wisdon that's as singular and fervent as its author. Read the book, experience the behind-the-scenes adventures, then pursue your own greenlights at full throttle.


Since I'll turn 73 next month I seriously doubt there are many "adventures" I can experience (although I am having a hell-uva time with my new hobby of collecting inexpensive guitars), playin at playin em, trying to sing and writing songs with words that don't rhyme and music mostly out of sync- but, IF I were a young man I would certainly reassess my life- I've said for years, and told my sons, and others, don't let life get in the way of livin- Mr. McConaughey lived that, with a passion very few even pretend to have and almost none possess-
 

Sunni Man

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The last book I read was "Empire of the Summer Moon".
It's the true story of Quanah Parker, the last free Chief of the Comanche Indians. The Comanche's were a large powerful tribe of fierce expert warriors on horseback, that controlled a vast area of Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma, called "Comancheria".

Quanah's mother was Cynthia Ann Parker, a 10 year old white girl kidnapped during a raid on the Parker family settlement in north Texas.
She was given an Indian name and adopted into the tribe. Later she married a tribal chief and gave birth to Quanah Parker.

Chief Quanah led his tribe on many bloody raids to halt the migration of white settlers and drive buffalo hunters off Comanche land, while fighting running battles with the US Army. But eventually with the almost total extermination of the buffalo causing starvation of his people. Quanah laid down his weapons and led his tribe to live on a Indian reservation in Oklahoma.

Quanah kept his tribal culture while adopting the white man's way's in business of buying land and raising large cattle herds. He eventually became the wealthiest Indian in America during that time period. Quanah was a close personal friend of President Roosevelt who would travel to Oklahoma and go on hunting trips with Quanah.

The book is a very good read, and also tells the story of the Texas Rangers role in protecting the settlers and were a formidable foe of the Comanche.

1605984626696.png
 
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Gdjjr

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I've read that- twice, at least. If I still have it, I may read it again, since I am out of new material to read.

Another one, similar, though mostly fictional with a little History thrown in for plausibility is; Comanche Dawn, by Mike Blakely-

In Comanche Dawn Mike Blakely does for the Comanche nation what Ruth Bebe Hills did for the Sioux in Hanta Yo. This landmark novel is the first time the story has been told from the point of view of the Comanches themselves. We witness the rise of one of the most powerful mounted nations in history through the eyes of a young warrior named Horseback.

Born on the very day that the first horse comes to his people, Horseback matures into a leader of unquestionable courage and vision. He assumes powerful medicine granted to him by spirits encountered on a grueling vision quest, and he takes Teal, the most beautiful young woman of his tribe, as his wife and lifelong love. Guided by forces more powerful and dangerous then even he can control or explain, Horseback will face death time and time again with only his medicine and Teal to stand beside him.

Failure will mean destruction not only for himself, but for his people. Success will mean unimaginable wealth for his new nation. Ancient enemies will seek to destroy him. Strange newcomers with pale skin and treacherous ways will attempt to enslave him. Even his own inner spirit powers threaten always to consume him, should he fail to respect them. Only the bravest of True Humans dare to follow Horseback on his great adventure down a trail that can lead only to glory or annihilation.
 

Gdjjr

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Well, I found I have new material to read- I think, since I don't remember reading it :oops: and I have a pretty good memory- but it was one of the locations (built in book shelf) where I put books I've read- but, I swear I don't remember it so far-

Spencerville, by Nelson Demille, author of The General's Daughter, which, in case y'all don't know was a John Travolta movie- the book was better, IMO- though I did enjoy the movie.

Anyway, I just started it yesterday after, so, I'm not that far into it, but, the scenery described, NW Ohio farm country, especially the downtown town description made me think of the video I'm posting. The story is keeping me interested, but I can't get the image of this video (especially the story this video tells) out of my mind as I read.



Now, excuse me while I go listen to this video again-
 

bluzman61

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Well, I found I have new material to read- I think, since I don't remember reading it :oops: and I have a pretty good memory- but it was one of the locations (built in book shelf) where I put books I've read- but, I swear I don't remember it so far-

Spencerville, by Nelson Demille, author of The General's Daughter, which, in case y'all don't know was a John Travolta movie- the book was better, IMO- though I did enjoy the movie.

Anyway, I just started it yesterday after, so, I'm not that far into it, but, the scenery described, NW Ohio farm country, especially the downtown town description made me think of the video I'm posting. The story is keeping me interested, but I can't get the image of this video (especially the story this video tells) out of my mind as I read.



Now, excuse me while I go listen to this video again-
I've read some of Demille's stuff. He's quite good. My favorites by him are Night Fall, The Lion's Game, and The Gold Coast. I met him at a book signing in Scottsdale, Arizona, 13-14 years ago. He was very nice.
 

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They Called Him Stonewall by Burke Davis I enjoy reading biographies of historical figures. Also more current ones .George W Bush Biography was a good read.
 

gipper

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The last book I read was "Empire of the Summer Moon".
It's the true story of Quanah Parker, the last free Chief of the Comanche Indians. The Comanche's were a large powerful tribe of fierce expert warriors on horseback, that controlled a vast area of Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma, called "Comancheria".

Quanah's mother was Cynthia Ann Parker, a 10 year old white girl kidnapped during a raid on the Parker family settlement in north Texas.
She was given an Indian name and adopted into the tribe. Later she married a tribal chief and gave birth to Quanah Parker.

Chief Quanah led his tribe on many bloody raids to halt the migration of white settlers and drive buffalo hunters off Comanche land, while fighting running battles with the US Army. But eventually with the almost total extermination of the buffalo causing starvation of his people. Quanah laid down his weapons and led his tribe to live on a Indian reservation in Oklahoma.

Quanah kept his tribal culture while adopting the white man's way's in business of buying land and raising large cattle herds. He eventually became the wealthiest Indian in America during that time period. Quanah was a close personal friend of President Roosevelt who would travel to Oklahoma and go on hunting trips with Quanah.

The book is a very good read, and also tells the story of the Texas Rangers role in protecting the settlers and were a formidable foe of the Comanche.

View attachment 419476
I’m half way through the book now. I knew the Comanche were tough, but I had no idea they were so dominant and were such amazing mounted warriors.

They used the horse to amazing effect. It changed their way of life and they became a great warrior nation. But it’s a contradiction in many ways. They advanced by using the horse, yet they remained a hunter gatherer nation with the same barbaric ways.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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HereWeGoAgain
What did you think of Heart of the Sea?
To be honest I dont remember.
Had to go back and check my library in the Kindle to see if I read it.
Apparently I did but dont remember reading it.
That was back in 2018 and I read a lot seagoing books for a stretch.
Went back and read the first few pages and I do remember it was pretty good.
 

OldLady

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HereWeGoAgain
What did you think of Heart of the Sea?
To be honest I dont remember.
Had to go back and check my library in the Kindle to see if I read it.
Apparently I did but dont remember reading it.
That was back in 2018 and I read a lot seagoing books for a stretch.
Went back and read the first few pages and I do remember it was pretty good.
I'd like to check out the book in Mike's OP, but I don't have Kindle.
 

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