Vegan Diet Bad?

Death Angel

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A vegan diet in general is a difficult assimilation especially when making sure one gets enough protein.

I know nothing of the athlete in the OP
However common sense dictates a diet HIGH in animal protein not vegie protein is necessary in the healing of injuries.
So much misinformation. How is it common sense that eating carrion promotes healing




Because we are omnivores and can process animal proteins better than plant proteins.
Correct, and strict herbivores like horses and cattle have multiple stomachs to process their plant diet.
Fruits are digested in MINUTES.

Cooked vegetables are digested in minutes.

I eat a lot of smoothies/protein shakes and juiced vegetables. They are digested in MINUTES.

Meat sits in the digestive system for hours. Some meats more than others.

No, meat is not a better source of nutrients, but I really dont care about your diet, just the misinformation.

This person's problems are NOT due to his diet, but OTHER factors.
 
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Death Angel

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I had an old friend from my church who died a few years ago. They suggested, not a vegan diet exactly, but to refrain from hard to digest foods because it taxes the digestive system and drains the body to eat some of these foods (meats, fried foods, etc). The less strain on the body due to these foods, the better. They suggested foods like I said I eat, to save his energy to for HEALING rather than digestion
 
OP
Leo123

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I had an old friend from my church who died a few years ago. They suggested, not a vegan diet exactly, but to refrain from hard to digest foods because it taxes the digestive system and drains the body to eat some of these foods (meats, fried foods, etc). The less strain on the body due to these foods, the better. They suggested foods like I said I eat, to save his energy to for HEALING rather than digestion
I am an advocate of moderation. In the U.S. it is so easy to overeat and even overeating non meat foods can be bad on the body. If one eats meat, perhaps a 1/4 lb of beef at one sitting for every meal may not be ideal for some folks. IMO, a vegan diet probably doesn't carry the nutrition density of a meat diet and therefore, can be good for those who may have trouble with over consumption or digestive issues. It is a lighter fare full of vitamins, ruffage, natural sugars, some light protein, etc. which may or may not be good for everyone.

I generally eat beef, very few vegetables and very little fruit. I find that my 'healing' after a heavy workout or an injury is just fine. Frankly, I think humans are omnivores and some are better with a heavy vegan diet and some are better with a meat heavy diet. But generally, I believe food intake should ideally match energy output.

If you sit in a chair all day, you may not need to eat that rib-eye steak for dinner. If you dig ditches all day a tub of Tofu may not be enough to mend your torn muscle tissues as quickly.
 
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westwall

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
 

westwall

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A vegan diet in general is a difficult assimilation especially when making sure one gets enough protein.

I know nothing of the athlete in the OP
However common sense dictates a diet HIGH in animal protein not vegie protein is necessary in the healing of injuries.
So much misinformation. How is it common sense that eating carrion promotes healing




Because we are omnivores and can process animal proteins better than plant proteins.
Correct, and strict herbivores like horses and cattle have multiple stomachs to process their plant diet.
Fruits are digested in MINUTES.

Cooked vegetables are digested in minutes.

I eat a lot of smoothies/protein shakes and juiced vegetables. They are digested in MINUTES.

Meat sits in the digestive system for hours. Some meats more than others.

No, meat is not a better source of nutrients, but I really dont care about your diet, just the misinformation.

This person's problems are NOT due to his diet, but OTHER factors.





Foods that process quickly don't provide much nutrition.

Take a look at the Mongols. They are a meat based diet and had no problem slaughtering the Chinese who were on a plant based diet.

The Chinese could only fight for a few hours while the Mongols could, quite literally, fight for days.
 

Dick Foster

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As a general rule, vegans are terrible santamonious assholes...
Seems to me it's the meat eaters who tend to act like assholes on boards like these.

Personally, I don't care what people do or eat so long as I'm not forced to equally do the same.
We're just your regular run of the mill, plain Jane, insufferable assholes, there is no sanctimony about us.
 

buttercup

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
:bsflag: You've been listening to too many pro-meat sources. The only thing that vegans may need to supplement is vitamin B12, but guess what? B12 is not made by animals, it is made by bacteria originally found in water and soil. And what many non-vegans don't realize is that because of poor soil these days and chlorinated water, even the animals people eat aren't getting enough B12, so in many cases livestock are getting B12 supplements... which means you're getting your B12 filtered through the decaying corpse of a tortured animal. You can be smart and cut out the middleman, and just get it straight from the source, by taking a supplement or eating foods fortified with B12.

I like how you completely ignored the words of all the major dietetics organizations in the world, which clearly state that you can obtain all the nutrients you need from a balanced plantbased diet. There is ZERO need to eat dead bodies.
 

MisterBeale

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"Newton’s diet would normally be his business. But after two underwhelming performances to begin the 2019 season, coupled with a lingering mid-left foot sprain that will cost him at least two games, it bears further examination."

"Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton went vegan in 2019, but nutritionists and trainers say the diet may be affecting the NFL star’s performance and ability to recover from a Lisfranc/mid-left foot sprain."



Read more here: https://www.charlotteobserver.com/sports/nfl/carolina-panthers/article235295427.html#storylink=cpy
I was on a vegan diet for a little while.

They are really difficult socially.

Awful for your mental health and emotional health if you do not make absolutely certain you are getting the correct micro nutrients. Hard to maintain balance.

Humans evolved with meat. So you really have to be devoted to them, it is a lifestyle, not a diet.
 

westwall

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
:bsflag: You've been listening to too many pro-meat sources. The only thing that vegans may need to supplement is vitamin B12, but guess what? B12 is not made by animals, it is made by bacteria originally found in water and soil. And what many non-vegans don't realize is that because of poor soil these days and chlorinated water, even the animals people eat aren't getting enough B12, so in many cases livestock are getting B12 supplements... which means you're getting your B12 filtered through the decaying corpse of a tortured animal. You can be smart and cut out the middleman, and just get it straight from the source, by taking a supplement or eating foods fortified with B12.

I like how you completely ignored the words of all the major dietetics organizations in the world, which clearly state that you can obtain all the nutrients you need from a balanced plantbased diet. There is ZERO need to eat dead bodies.




No, I read and understand history. Something you are clearly unfamiliar with.
 

MisterBeale

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
Because of the way food is produced today, I don't care if you eat meat or not, EVERYONE should be taking supplements. If not, you will eventually start to succumb to chronic disease, Alzheimer, arthritis, chronic pain, heart disease, etc. They count on folks not getting enough micro-nutrients, it is good for the medical industry.

Non-organic food, industrialized production, over-processing of our food, etc., all of these problems have caused nutricide in the system.

 

MisterBeale

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
:bsflag: You've been listening to too many pro-meat sources. The only thing that vegans may need to supplement is vitamin B12, but guess what? B12 is not made by animals, it is made by bacteria originally found in water and soil. And what many non-vegans don't realize is that because of poor soil these days and chlorinated water, even the animals people eat aren't getting enough B12, so in many cases livestock are getting B12 supplements... which means you're getting your B12 filtered through the decaying corpse of a tortured animal. You can be smart and cut out the middleman, and just get it straight from the source, by taking a supplement or eating foods fortified with B12.

I like how you completely ignored the words of all the major dietetics organizations in the world, which clearly state that you can obtain all the nutrients you need from a balanced plantbased diet. There is ZERO need to eat dead bodies.
There is some debate about whether the essential amino acids are necessary, which really, CAN ONLY BE FOUND IN MEAT. The vitamins can be synthesized, and there are plant based analogs, but they are not the same. Some people tend to need them, while others are fine with out them.

There is no need to be divisive on this issue. Some folks, genuinely DO NOT FEEL RIGHT, if they go longer than six months or more with out it. . . it is a "brain fog."

. . . and Vegans, after they have lived this lifestyle for a while, tends to be more of a "religious" crusade, than a diet.

Do you not admit that animal welfare is an important motivating factor for you? :dunno:


For humans, nothing will taste better than meat, there is a reason for this.

 

buttercup

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
Because of the way food is produced today, I don't care if you eat meat or not, EVERYONE should be taking supplements. If not, you will eventually start to succumb to chronic disease, Alzheimer, arthritis, chronic pain, heart disease, etc. They count on folks not getting enough micro-nutrients, it is good for the medical industry.

Non-organic food, industrialized production, over-processing of our food, etc., all of these problems have caused nutricide in the system.

I eat a pretty healthy diet, I've been vegan for 3 1/2 years, and the last time I got my blood checked, everything came back perfect. I almost never get sick. But I'm not disagreeing with what you're saying. It's always good to be safe and especially for people who aren't always eating super healthy things, then yeah, it's a good idea to take certain supplements.

But I've come to believe in the old saying "Let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food."
 

buttercup

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. . . and Vegans, after they have lived this lifestyle for a while, tends to be more of a "religious" crusade, than a diet.

Do you not admit that animal welfare is an important motivating factor for you? :dunno:
Yep, it's not a diet, it's an ethical position. I think a lot of people wrongly think of it as only a diet. And yeah, I'm vegan for the animals. But it just so happens that now I'm eating WAY healthier than I did in the past, when I was on the S.A.D.
 

MisterBeale

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Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage. Vegetarians and vegans are at reduced risk of certain health conditions, including ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain types of cancer, and obesity.

https://jandonline.org/article/S2212...192-3/fulltext


Harvard Medical School

Traditionally, research into vegetarianism focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.


The Mayo Clinic

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.


Dietitians of Canada

A healthy vegan diet can meet all your nutrient needs at any stage of life including when you are pregnant, breastfeeding or for older adults.


British Dietetic Association

Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (...) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.


The British National Health Service

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.


The Dietitians Association of Australia

Vegan diets differ to other vegetarian diets in that no animal products are consumed or used. Despite these restrictions, with good planning it is still possible to obtain all the nutrients required for good health on a vegan diet.




You MUST take supplements to survive on a vegan diet.

That means it is bad for you.
Because of the way food is produced today, I don't care if you eat meat or not, EVERYONE should be taking supplements. If not, you will eventually start to succumb to chronic disease, Alzheimer, arthritis, chronic pain, heart disease, etc. They count on folks not getting enough micro-nutrients, it is good for the medical industry.

Non-organic food, industrialized production, over-processing of our food, etc., all of these problems have caused nutricide in the system.

I eat a pretty healthy diet, I've been vegan for 3 1/2 years, and the last time I got my blood checked, everything came back perfect. I almost never get sick. But I'm not disagreeing with what you're saying. It's always good to be safe and especially for people who aren't always eating super healthy things, then yeah, it's a good idea to take certain supplements.

But I've come to believe in the old saying "Let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food."
Agreed. But, if you look to old sayings and the wisdom of ancestors? None of them were Vegan, not even Hippocrates, who that saying came from. Even in Ayurvedic teachings, where food is medicine, they eat meat.

https://healthwyze.org/archive/nutrition_and_physical_degeneration_doctor_weston_a_price.pdf

I have several Vegan friends, only one of them runs an organic farm and stays away from processed food. I have another friend that is an anarcho-capitalist who loves meat and refuses to eat processed food? IMO, he eats healthier than the Vegans.

10 Reasons Why I'll Never Be Vegan

Most Vegans eat more sugar than meat eaters.

 

Deplorable Yankee

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Humans are omnivores ...its called proper a balance

Meat veggies fruits grain it up to you to figure out what works best for oneself

I've been skipping meat once or twice a week since I'm a teen
 

Muhammed

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A vegan diet in general is a difficult assimilation especially when making sure one gets enough protein.

I know nothing of the athlete in the OP
However common sense dictates a diet HIGH in animal protein not vegie protein is necessary in the healing of injuries.
So much misinformation. How is it common sense that eating carrion promotes healing




Because we are omnivores and can process animal proteins better than plant proteins.
Correct, and strict herbivores like horses and cattle have multiple stomachs to process their plant diet.
Bullshit!

Horses are monogastric. They do not have multiple stomachs.

The Equine Digestive System
 
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OP
Leo123

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A vegan diet in general is a difficult assimilation especially when making sure one gets enough protein.

I know nothing of the athlete in the OP
However common sense dictates a diet HIGH in animal protein not vegie protein is necessary in the healing of injuries.
So much misinformation. How is it common sense that eating carrion promotes healing




Because we are omnivores and can process animal proteins better than plant proteins.
Correct, and strict herbivores like horses and cattle have multiple stomachs to process their plant diet.
Bullshit!

Horses are monogastric. They do not have multiple stomachs.

The Equine Digestive System
Horses have a fore gut and a hind gut, you are correct. I am correct in that horses have a 2 stage digestive system.

"The equine digestive tract is unique in that it digests portions of its feeds enzymatically first in the foregut and ferments in the hindgut. The horse’s digestive system really should be thought of as being in two sections."

The Horse's Digestive System | HyGain Horse Feed
 

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