CDZ Trump: "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose any voters"

theHawk

Registered Conservative
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Messages
27,396
Reaction score
7,337
Points
280
Location
Arizona
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
 
OP
Esmeralda

Esmeralda

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
28,585
Reaction score
21,320
Points
2,415
Location
Washington State
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
Address the topic. This is the clean debate zone.
I did. President Trump likes to use hyperbole in his humor.

Why is it so hard for you to comprehend? Liberals are writing up psychological profiles over a joke? It’s a poor attempt and trying to portray the President as being mentally unstable. But since progressives have no ideas to win on, it’s their only avenue now.
I deleted what I said. I misunderstood your post. I thought you were referring to the entire OP as that's what you quoted. Then I saw you only referred to the last 2 lines. Sorry.
I was referring to the title of the thread.
Oh, okay. I think it was meant as a joke but refrerred seriously to the depth of loyalty of his supporters, which is what the thread is about and what accounts for that depth of loyalty.

Do you agree or disagree with the analysis and why or why not?
 
OP
Esmeralda

Esmeralda

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
28,585
Reaction score
21,320
Points
2,415
Location
Washington State
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
I think the real issue is, as far as the OP goes, is why his loyal supporters, who are often quite conservative and religious people, are not offended by the things he says and tweets, with the crudeness of his expression.
 

theHawk

Registered Conservative
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Messages
27,396
Reaction score
7,337
Points
280
Location
Arizona
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
I think the real issue is, as far as the OP goes, is why his loyal supporters, who are often quite conservative and religious people, are not offended by the things he says and tweets, with the crudeness of his expression.
I think it’s funny a leftwingers is accusing conservatives as being “authoritative” just for supporting Trump.

Going the “religious fundies” route in trying to belittle the people that voted for Trump is barking up the wrong tree. The religious right candidates all got pummeled by Trump in the primaries.

We conservatives aren’t like you progressive types, we can be honest about our intentions and motivations for voting the way we do. We voted for President Trump because he is a fighter, he wasn’t afraid to attack the liberal MSM head on. Go back and look at his many press conferences where he stood toe to toe with the MSM blasting him with questions. He wasn’t afraid to attack the Dems and Hillary, unlike other GOP candidates that have always taken the high ground and were never willing to attack Obama and Hillary.

He was also the only candidate that addressed in a serious manner the fleecing if American manufacturing jobs over the last few decades to China and Mexico, because both the GOP and Dems were guilty of doing it.

Finally there is immigration, where yet again both parties were not serious about stopping the massive illegal immigration crisis. Dems fully support unlimited immigration, especially from third world countries in order to bring in more poor minorities. Not because the country in any way would benefit from them, but because it would help Dems win elections because of demographics. The GOP were just too afraid to address it out of fear of being called racists. Multiculturalism has proven to be a huge failure in America and in Europe, and most Americans believe it’s time to stop importing third world trash.
 

Penelope

Diamond Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
45,006
Reaction score
4,649
Points
1,860
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
I think the real issue is, as far as the OP goes, is why his loyal supporters, who are often quite conservative and religious people, are not offended by the things he says and tweets, with the crudeness of his expression.
I think it’s funny a leftwingers is accusing conservatives as being “authoritative” just for supporting Trump.

Going the “religious fundies” route in trying to belittle the people that voted for Trump is barking up the wrong tree. The religious right candidates all got pummeled by Trump in the primaries.

We conservatives aren’t like you progressive types, we can be honest about our intentions and motivations for voting the way we do. We voted for President Trump because he is a fighter, he wasn’t afraid to attack the liberal MSM head on. Go back and look at his many press conferences where he stood toe to toe with the MSM blasting him with questions. He wasn’t afraid to attack the Dems and Hillary, unlike other GOP candidates that have always taken the high ground and were never willing to attack Obama and Hillary.

He was also the only candidate that addressed in a serious manner the fleecing if American manufacturing jobs over the last few decades to China and Mexico, because both the GOP and Dems were guilty of doing it.

Finally there is immigration, where yet again both parties were not serious about stopping the massive illegal immigration crisis. Dems fully support unlimited immigration, especially from third world countries in order to bring in more poor minorities. Not because the country in any way would benefit from them, but because it would help Dems win elections because of demographics. The GOP were just too afraid to address it out of fear of being called racists. Multiculturalism has proven to be a huge failure in America and in Europe, and most Americans believe it’s time to stop importing third world trash.
You must listen to Rush and Fox too much. The Dems are not for illegal immigration anymore than the Pubs are. Look at your God, he hired illegals for his golf course in Fl. and is involved globally. The white man brought the black man here to work for them, and well the Indians and the Hispanics were here before the white man. Learn to live with others, you will have to.

DT won't do anything about China, or Mexico, because he can't and shouldn't. We do not need to regress to 1930 technology which is what he wants. Coal is not coming back and should not.
 

Political Junky

Gold Member
Joined
May 27, 2009
Messages
25,793
Reaction score
3,982
Points
280
John Dean, in his book "Conservatives Without Conscience", says conservatives want authoritarian leaders.
 

Penelope

Diamond Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
45,006
Reaction score
4,649
Points
1,860
And when was a farmer's pond declared 'wetland' and confiscated by the
authorities'?
And an Alex Jones link won't constitute 'proof'.






There are loads more examples. You should acquaint yourself with the massive over reach of the EPA that you continue to defend.


EPA settles with Wyoming farmer over man-made pond

EPA settles with Wyoming farmer over man-made pond

Why farmers and ranchers think the EPA Clean Water Rule goes too far

Why farmers and ranchers think the EPA Clean Water Rule goes too far

well cons never cared about pollution.
 

Muhammed

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2010
Messages
17,631
Reaction score
3,449
Points
290
Location
North Coast, USA
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
 

jillian

Princess
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
83,829
Reaction score
15,468
Points
2,220
Location
The Other Side of Paradise
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
except he is.

you just don't care because he spews your anger and bigotry and makes you feel like your ignorances isn't ignorant.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

there has never been a president t who lies this sociopathically. but he's your sociopath.... your human version of a massive internet troll.
 

Penelope

Diamond Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
45,006
Reaction score
4,649
Points
1,860
John Dean, in his book "Conservatives Without Conscience", says conservatives want authoritarian leaders.
Well we can see that with the Potus we have, and the Cons in Al that would vote for Moore no matter what. Partisan over Conscience.
 

theHawk

Registered Conservative
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Messages
27,396
Reaction score
7,337
Points
280
Location
Arizona
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
except he is.

you just don't care because he spews your anger and bigotry and makes you feel like your ignorances isn't ignorant.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

there has never been a president t who lies this sociopathically. but he's your sociopath.... your human version of a massive internet troll.
That entire list may as well be the USMB, as every one of those “lies” were posted by Dems and debunked by us conservatives.
 

Penelope

Diamond Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
45,006
Reaction score
4,649
Points
1,860
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
No, I believe he is honest in his tweets, I do not believe he is unhinged, and that is what scares me. He is anti everything except if they show adoration and love for him, and allow him to rule as he wants, the sign of a true dictator. Look at his history.

PS: I think its the cons who think he is joking.
 

frigidweirdo

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
32,238
Reaction score
3,228
Points
1,130
It’s called humor. This particular joke uses something called hyperbole.

Definition of HYPERBOLE
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
except he is.

you just don't care because he spews your anger and bigotry and makes you feel like your ignorances isn't ignorant.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

there has never been a president t who lies this sociopathically. but he's your sociopath.... your human version of a massive internet troll.
That entire list may as well be the USMB, as every one of those “lies” were posted by Dems and debunked by us conservatives.
Debunked meaning someone came on and said "it's all fake news" and then for evidence they said "i know it's true, I don't need to provide evidence"???
 

jillian

Princess
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
83,829
Reaction score
15,468
Points
2,220
Location
The Other Side of Paradise
And all his tweets do as well? BS, what comes out of a man's mouth is what is inside of him. This comes from scripture, the tongue is the most dangerous weapon.
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
except he is.

you just don't care because he spews your anger and bigotry and makes you feel like your ignorances isn't ignorant.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

there has never been a president t who lies this sociopathically. but he's your sociopath.... your human version of a massive internet troll.
That entire list may as well be the USMB, as every one of those “lies” were posted by Dems and debunked by us conservatives.
Debunked meaning someone came on and said "it's all fake news" and then for evidence they said "i know it's true, I don't need to provide evidence"???
no. debunked as in presented actual fact instead of hannity insanity.

I hope that helps.
 

Oldstyle

Platinum Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2011
Messages
31,206
Reaction score
4,924
Points
1,160
Location
Florida
Please discuss the analysis in the OP. Thank you.
Analysis? LOL After declaring Donald Trump mentally deficient to be President...a bunch of liberal sociologists have decided that those who voted for him also have mental issues and that explains their vote? Can I be painfully blunt here, Esmeralda? Your "analysis" is simply one more pathetic attempt by the left to explain why the voters wouldn't listen to them and vote for Hillary Clinton!
 

frigidweirdo

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
32,238
Reaction score
3,228
Points
1,130
So you’re mad that he is honest when he talks and tweets?
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
except he is.

you just don't care because he spews your anger and bigotry and makes you feel like your ignorances isn't ignorant.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

there has never been a president t who lies this sociopathically. but he's your sociopath.... your human version of a massive internet troll.
That entire list may as well be the USMB, as every one of those “lies” were posted by Dems and debunked by us conservatives.
Debunked meaning someone came on and said "it's all fake news" and then for evidence they said "i know it's true, I don't need to provide evidence"???
no. debunked as in presented actual fact instead of hannity insanity.

I hope that helps.
Doesn't help at all, because I've been on this forum a long time, and I've seen what passes for "debunked" by the right, and I've seen what doesn't pass, and it's got nothing to do with evidence, logic, etc, it's to do with agenda, convenience and the fact that the right thinks it's right all the damn time.
 

Correll

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2015
Messages
63,663
Reaction score
8,312
Points
2,070
What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist

Your whole "analysis" is based on an out of context quote. He is the full quote.


Trump: "I Could Stand In the Middle Of Fifth Avenue And Shoot Somebody And I Wouldn't Lose Any Voters"





"You know what else they say about my people? The polls, they say I have the most loyal people. Did you ever see that? Where I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose any voters, okay? It’s like incredible," Trump said."





In it's entirety, you can see that HE is not stating that he could shoot people, and not lose voters, but that the POLLS are showing that.



IN context we see it is nothing but a standard, for Trump, use of hyperbole to make a point.
 

jillian

Princess
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
83,829
Reaction score
15,468
Points
2,220
Location
The Other Side of Paradise
That certainly appears to be the case.

People are not used to candidates who are not full of bullshit.
except he is.

you just don't care because he spews your anger and bigotry and makes you feel like your ignorances isn't ignorant.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

there has never been a president t who lies this sociopathically. but he's your sociopath.... your human version of a massive internet troll.
That entire list may as well be the USMB, as every one of those “lies” were posted by Dems and debunked by us conservatives.
Debunked meaning someone came on and said "it's all fake news" and then for evidence they said "i know it's true, I don't need to provide evidence"???
no. debunked as in presented actual fact instead of hannity insanity.

I hope that helps.
Doesn't help at all, because I've been on this forum a long time, and I've seen what passes for "debunked" by the right, and I've seen what doesn't pass, and it's got nothing to do with evidence, logic, etc, it's to do with agenda, convenience and the fact that the right thinks it's right all the damn time.
you'll notice I've been a member of this board since 2006. I know exactly what this group of "people" is.

that said, I know and agree.
 

New Posts

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top