CDZ Trump: "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose any voters"

FA_Q2

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
 

Penelope

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Mine was not one-time support. I liked Trump from day one and predicted he would win the whole shebang. He did. I like him even more now.
So then you're just in the tank for Trump, no matter what.

Got it.

Not sure why you're speaking for all other Trump voters, when you're a die-hard shill for 45.
Mr. MarcATL, you just don't get it about good businessmen and Trump. You treat people as good as you can, you do good deeds, you love America's defenders, you run your business like you know what your customers need and you make sure they get it, and when someone waltzes into your employ and acts like a baboon or a bull in a China closet with a customer, you have to tell them that they are fired and why, so they'll never do anything that stupid ever again the next time they're lucky enough to get a good job. And you answer verbal bullies, too, as needed. In Trump's case, the leftist lying cheating pantywaists, you get a twitter account and talk back to them. Oh, wait. Trump already did all those rightful things! What a coincidence that all Obama's men couldn't get any of their lies pasted on President Trump. He did no wrong thing to anyone who didn't have it coming.

That's why business people like this bright, honest, and good man. And that's exactly what the evidence showed for the fifty million dollars the leftwingers in Congress spent trying to find one--only just one itsy, bitsy, teensy, weenie error in all that, and they found zippo, nada, nothingburger, not one single thing due to his street smart savvy about what brings people back to your business. Plus, he is something of a financial wiz, which makes him America's MVP.

Sorry to be so cheerful when I speak tragedy to your little plots to "get Trump and all his supporters."
Tramp is a serial adulterer and a serial female assaulter. He Is a pathological liar and his answer for everything is sue.

He filed bankruptcy 6 times for taking every last crumb out of his businesses and used them for personal reasons and to enrich himself stiffing workers and sub contractors.

He is a crook and he has a Roy Cohn at his side by the name of Barr and Moscow Mitch. He is slime as far as one can go on the scale.

How do you like those illegals he hired for years and probably still has them working for him??

PS: very good friends with Epstein for many years, he likes them young as well.
 

Tumblin Tumbleweed

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We voted for President Trump because he is a fighter, he wasn’t afraid to attack the liberal MSM head on. Go back and look at his many press conferences where he stood toe to toe with the MSM blasting him with questions.
The Orange Virus is the weakest leader this country has ever had. He's a blatant narcissist, a clear sign he is inherently self conscious. A sure sign of a weak leader. He doesn't come off as very masculine to me, so the 'fighter' label is a misnomer. He's a 1%er blue-blood CEO type, so he's never worked very hard in his life. His history of bankruptcies and stiffing contractors also tells me he's not a great businessman either. His behavior toward taking on the media is adolescent and crude, and he gets blasted for it daily. The 4th Estate makes mincemeat out of him. This is why he goes 170+ days between press conferences. He quite clearly can't handle criticism, which brings me back to the weak leader thing.

How one can identify themselves as a conservative today and still support this con man is hypocrisy in action. But, that's the rub. Any hardliner for any current political party in this country should at least be honest about their own blatant hypocrisy, but they always refuse, and here we are.

He wasn’t afraid to attack the Dems and Hillary, unlike other GOP candidates that have always taken the high ground and were never willing to attack Obama and Hillary.
Republicans attack Democrats and vice-versa. That isn't anything new or interesting in our political environment. However, the complete destruction of civility and decorum in both parties is what we should be regretful for. It's why I detest tribalism and extremism.

He was also the only candidate that addressed in a serious manner the fleecing if American manufacturing jobs over the last few decades to China and Mexico, because both the GOP and Dems were guilty of doing it.
Simply addressing a problem isn't noteworthy. Doing something about it is.

Finally there is immigration, where yet again both parties were not serious about stopping the massive illegal immigration crisis.
They're still not serious about it. A stupid wall isn't a solution. Locking people in cages isn't a solution. Open borders isn't a solution. Complete, scorched earth, immigration reform is the only realistic solution that neither party wants to tackle. Because it would actually be hard work. Since neither party wants that, talking points is all we get.

Dems fully support unlimited immigration, especially from third world countries in order to bring in more poor minorities.
I've yet to have a conversation with any Dem that actually believe this. Citation? Or do you just converse with extremists?

Not because the country in any way would benefit from them, but because it would help Dems win elections because of demographics.
And people that believe this unsubstantiated talking point expect to be taken seriously. :auiqs.jpg:Hilarious.
 
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Esmeralda

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.
 

FA_Q2

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.
And they line up to prove my point for me.
 
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Esmeralda

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.
And they line up to prove my point for me.
If that is how you read my post you have serious intellectual issues, like seeing what you want to see instead of what is. It is not a coincidence that the vast majority of the developed world sees Drumph as a scourge on democracy and as an insufferable buffoon.
 

sartre play

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Don't see the point of just picking out the mistakes one party makes while in power. the pound deal looks like overkill on the part of the Democrats. while the cutting of many regulation's that protects the extra earning power of corporations by allowing them to pollute rivers streams & land instead of having to spend more money to keep things cleaner. over kill in either direction is no good for any of us. when are we going to demand a balance of power.
 

FA_Q2

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.
And they line up to prove my point for me.
If that is how you read my post you have serious intellectual issues, like seeing what you want to see instead of what is. It is not a coincidence that the vast majority of the developed world sees Drumph as a scourge on democracy and as an insufferable buffoon.
If that is how I read this:
"They are those things"

It is pretty clear. You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people. It is pretty clear I am not the one seeing what I want to - that is clearly your wheelhouse.
 
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Esmeralda

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Don't see the point of just picking out the mistakes one party makes while in power. the pound deal looks like overkill on the part of the Democrats. while the cutting of many regulation's that protects the extra earning power of corporations by allowing them to pollute rivers streams & land instead of having to spend more money to keep things cleaner. over kill in either direction is no good for any of us. when are we going to demand a balance of power.
It's not as if what trump is doing are mistakes. He is purposely undoing safety amd environmental regulations of the previous adminstration simply out of spite, thus causing irreparable damage to the environment. He has caused the current problem with Iran by pulling out of the nuclear agreement. He's endangering the oil supply and causing gas prices to rise, as well as provoking a dangerous environment that can risk lives. He's caused farmers and others to suffer economically because of his trade wars. He's alienated our allies. It's not mistakes. He is purposely sowing chaos.
 

Tumblin Tumbleweed

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You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people.
The truth sometimes stings a bit.
 
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Esmeralda

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.
And they line up to prove my point for me.
If that is how you read my post you have serious intellectual issues, like seeing what you want to see instead of what is. It is not a coincidence that the vast majority of the developed world sees Drumph as a scourge on democracy and as an insufferable buffoon.
If that is how I read this:
"They are those things"

It is pretty clear. You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people. It is pretty clear I am not the one seeing what I want to - that is clearly your wheelhouse.
I am not smearing anyone. Facts are facts. Maybe someday you will be able to see that. Maybe not.
 

deanrd

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It’s obvious that Republicans will turn on trump the way they turned on Bush. But it took Trump making fun of Bush before they turned on him. Will they need some other ConMan to tell them what to do before they turn on trump or will they do it on their own?
 

Tumblin Tumbleweed

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You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people.
The truth sometimes stings a bit.
And another one comes right along and proves my point again.
There is much contempt for those 40%, so what more do you want? Do you want me to pretend and say nice things about them?
 

Correll

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.

This nation has had a bi-partisan consensus against white racism, since the mid-60s, when the dem finally gave up on that issue.

NO sane person would see white racism as a significant force today.


You are suffering from mass hysteria.


At best.
 

Correll

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist
You ask to discuss civilly and then post a wall that essentially declares 40% of Americans authoritarian hate mongers.

You want to know why Trump supporters are so rabid? This is exactly why. They are pretty damn tired of being labeled bigots, racists and authoritarians. Nothing Trump does outweighs this type of vitriol.
They aren't being labeled those things. They are those things. And BTY this "vitriol" is absolutely nothing compared to the damage Drumph is doing to our country. He is a mentally ill narscist wanna be dictator.
And they line up to prove my point for me.
If that is how you read my post you have serious intellectual issues, like seeing what you want to see instead of what is. It is not a coincidence that the vast majority of the developed world sees Drumph as a scourge on democracy and as an insufferable buffoon.

Because the rest of the world has gotten used to America being the world's bitch on trade, defense and immigration, and hates the idea that the free ride might be over?


Or is it just that the rest of the developed world is just as tainted by modern liberalism, and thus is just as delusional as American lefties?
 

Correll

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You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people.
The truth sometimes stings a bit.
And another one comes right along and proves my point again.
There is much contempt for those 40%, so what more do you want? Do you want me to pretend and say nice things about them?

The hate you feel when you think of that 40%, is you being the bad guy, not US.
 

FA_Q2

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You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people.
The truth sometimes stings a bit.
And another one comes right along and proves my point again.
There is much contempt for those 40%, so what more do you want? Do you want me to pretend and say nice things about them?
I would prefer you not hold millions in contempt because they disagree with you politically. It is that very asinine position that has corrupted our political system so thoroughly. When your opposition is contemptible then you give your own side a pass on may thing because they are the lesser of two evils.

It is sad that you can recognize such when Trump uses dehumanizing language for others but then do not even realize the dehumanizing language that is used against his supporters.

And this dates way further back than Trump. he is a symptom of a political system that is disarray because the right and left are busy hating charactures that do not even remotely resemble the other side.
 

Tumblin Tumbleweed

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You smear 40% of the nation as racists, bigots and authoritarians. Besides the massive amount of arrogance such requires, it is a pretty shitty thing to say about millions of people.
The truth sometimes stings a bit.
And another one comes right along and proves my point again.
There is much contempt for those 40%, so what more do you want? Do you want me to pretend and say nice things about them?
I would prefer you not hold millions in contempt because they disagree with you politically. It is that very asinine position that has corrupted our political system so thoroughly. When your opposition is contemptible then you give your own side a pass on may thing because they are the lesser of two evils.

It is sad that you can recognize such when Trump uses dehumanizing language for others but then do not even realize the dehumanizing language that is used against his supporters.

And this dates way further back than Trump. he is a symptom of a political system that is disarray because the right and left are busy hating charactures that do not even remotely resemble the other side.
And I wring my hands right beside you about it. I do. But it makes absolutely no difference in the long run beyond exercising our right to vote. No one seems willing to give any ground in this environment. Deadlocked. In some ways, that's a positive. It means we stave off our mutually assured destruction for a little while longer.
 

caddo kid

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What makes Trump supporters tick? This is an interesting analysis and makes a lot of sense. Please discuss, civily, the ideas in the analysis.

"During and after World War II, psychologists conceived of the authoritarian personality as a pattern of attitudes and values revolving around adherence to society’s traditional norms, submission to authorities who personify or reinforce those norms, and antipathy—to the point of hatred and aggression—toward those who either challenge in-group norms or lie outside their orbit. Among white Americans, high scores on measures of authoritarianism today tend to be associated with prejudice against a wide range of “out-groups,” including homosexuals, African Americans, immigrants, and Muslims. Authoritarianism is also associated with suspiciousness of the humanities and the arts, and with cognitive rigidity, militaristic sentiments, and Christian fundamentalism.

When individuals with authoritarian proclivities fear that their way of life is being threatened, they may turn to strong leaders who promise to keep them safe—leaders like Donald Trump. In a national poll conducted recently by the political scientist Matthew MacWilliams, high levels of authoritarianism emerged as the single strongest predictor of expressing political support for Donald Trump. Trump’s promise to build a wall on the Mexican border to keep illegal immigrants out and his railing against Muslims and other outsiders have presumably fed that dynamic.

As the social psychologist Jesse Graham has noted, Trump appeals to an ancient fear of contagion, which analogizes out-groups to parasites, poisons, and other impurities. In this regard, it is perhaps no psychological accident that Trump displays a phobia of germs, and seems repulsed by bodily fluids, especially women’s. He famously remarked that Megyn Kelly of Fox News had “blood coming out of her wherever,” and he repeatedly characterized Hillary Clinton’s bathroom break during a Democratic debate as “disgusting.” Disgust is a primal response to impurity. On a daily basis, Trump seems to experience more disgust, or at least to say he does, than most people do.

The authoritarian mandate is to ensure the security, purity, and goodness of the in-group—to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. In the 1820s, white settlers in Georgia and other frontier areas lived in constant fear of American Indian tribes. They resented the federal government for not keeping them safe from what they perceived to be a mortal threat and a corrupting contagion. Responding to these fears, President Jackson pushed hard for the passage of the Indian Removal Act, which eventually led to the forced relocation of 45,000 American Indians. At least 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears, which ran from Georgia to the Oklahoma territory.

An American strand of authoritarianism may help explain why the thrice-married, foul-mouthed Donald Trump should prove to be so attractive to white Christian evangelicals. As Jerry Falwell Jr. told The New York Times in February, “All the social issues—traditional family values, abortion—are moot if isis blows up some of our cities or if the borders are not fortified.” Rank-and-file evangelicals “are trying to save the country,” Falwell said. Being “saved” has a special resonance among evangelicals—saved from sin and damnation, of course, but also saved from the threats and impurities of a corrupt and dangerous world.

When my research associates and I once asked politically conservative Christians scoring high on authoritarianism to imagine what their life (and their world) might have been like had they never found religious faith, many described utter chaos—families torn apart, rampant infidelity and hate, cities on fire, the inner rings of hell. By contrast, equally devout politically liberal Christians who scored low on authoritarianism described a barren world depleted of all resources, joyless and bleak, like the arid surface of the moon. For authoritarian Christians, a strong faith—like a strong leader—saves them from chaos and tamps down fears and conflicts. Donald Trump is a savior, even if he preens and swears, and waffles on the issue of abortion.

In December, on the campaign trail in Raleigh, North Carolina, Trump stoked fears in his audience by repeatedly saying that “something bad is happening” and “something really dangerous is going on.” He was asked by a 12-year-old girl from Virginia, “I’m scared—what are you going to do to protect this country?”

Trump responded: “You know what, darling? You’re not going to be scared anymore. They’re going to be scared.” "


The Narcissist

I see the support Trump has received by those that support him as a phenomena of weakness.
Trump's support comes from those that are in fear. Fear is a sure sign of weakness.
Trump's supporters fear immigrants, and are xenophobic.
Trump's supporters fear homosexuals & the GLBT community, and thus are bigots.
Trump's supporters fear non whites, and are racists.
Trump's supporters fear Muslims, all while they 'claim' to be Christian, and thus they are cowards.
Trump's supporters fear 'the deep state' because their messiah has directed them to fear America.
Trump's supporters fear the loss of employment opportunities due to perceived trade issues, when in fact the very corporations that supports many of the fearful's 401Ks are the culprits that are shipping jobs elsewhere.

Fear breeds contempt for nearly everything except for self survival. Trump's supporters have no issue with Trump destroying what they & Trump perceive as being 'wrong' with America, just as long as it benefits their own demographic, and opinion. Trump's MO to attempt this type of 'protection' for his supporters has to be undertaken with an authoritarian type takeover & makeover of America. This is quite obvious as we have seen Trump abuse his Article 2 powers again & again, yet his supporters have no issue with Trump's continual abuses of The US Constitution. This is a demonstration of those fearful Trump supporters seeing their own nation being torn asunder, and their own Constitution being burned into nothing of meaning, by the one individual they see as their one & only opportunity to save their own nation, by destroying it from within.

The whole phenomena of Trump & his supporters will end in the worst disaster this nation has ever experienced.
The movement was born from fear; a fear that will transform & consume the nation. We see this happening daily.
 

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