Treating PTSD Without Pills or Shots

longknife

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Messages
42,221
Reaction score
13,040
Points
2,250
Location
Sin City




Far too many of us - both military and civilian - fail to admit that we were weak enough to fall into the trap of suffering from the things we saw and experienced. And, when we do, the result is that doctors generally turn to what they know, a wide variety of medications designed to supposedly ease the unseen agony.



There are other proven ways of treating PTSD.



In Sonora Symphony, A tale about alternative treatments for PTSD, I write about a soldier suffering selective amnesia from a traumatic encounter in Afghanistan. Sick and tired of the poking and prodding and incessant questions, he leaves the medical hospital having no idea where he's going. He ends up in an all-night diner outside of Tuscon, Arizona where his spirit guides place him before a Native American elder who once served as a Green Beret. The elder takes him in and, through a combination of many different methods, helps erase the deep pain and allow the painful memories to return. An unusual twist is the soldier discovers he is half-Cherokee and undergoes a vision quest that enable him to find the path back to health - and a future.



Sonora Symphony is available for reading on a Kindle or other electronic devices @ https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N8YZUDG/?tag=ff0d01-20 (as well as all the other Amazon.com outlets) or in paperback @ https://www.amazon.com/Sonora-Symph...sr=1-1&keywords=Sonora+Symphony&tag=ff0d01-20



My only request is that when you finish reading it, please return to the site and rate it or give it a brief review.



I sincerely hope that someone - if no more than one - suffering the hidden agony of PTSD finds this to be a help.
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,551
Reaction score
8,900
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
Weed. Many people feel the best way is with weed.
Actually, you're not far off. I go to CO a couple of times a year for the 420 shops, and I hear LOTS of stories from fellow veterans (I always wear my Navy ballcap), who tell me that when they came back, they were on pill regimens of up to 12 pills per day and were suffering side effects from all the medication that had a bad effect on their health.

Lots of them, when CO legalized marijuana for recreational use switched over to marijuana as an alternative method to all the pills. Know what happened to all the people I've talked to? They were able to stop taking so much medicine and their health returned. The calming effect of cannabis (different people have a preference for different varieties) had helped them to deal with their PTSD.

I really think that the VA should look into this. Seriously.
 
OP
longknife

longknife

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Messages
42,221
Reaction score
13,040
Points
2,250
Location
Sin City
Weed. Many people feel the best way is with weed.
Actually, you're not far off. I go to CO a couple of times a year for the 420 shops, and I hear LOTS of stories from fellow veterans (I always wear my Navy ballcap), who tell me that when they came back, they were on pill regimens of up to 12 pills per day and were suffering side effects from all the medication that had a bad effect on their health.

Lots of them, when CO legalized marijuana for recreational use switched over to marijuana as an alternative method to all the pills. Know what happened to all the people I've talked to? They were able to stop taking so much medicine and their health returned. The calming effect of cannabis (different people have a preference for different varieties) had helped them to deal with their PTSD.

I really think that the VA should look into this. Seriously.
I've read several articles where it is thought marijuana will be considered by the VA when Trump takes office.
 

Fenton Lum

Gold Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
22,735
Reaction score
1,439
Points
265
Weed. Many people feel the best way is with weed.
If used properly with meditation and other soothing pasttimes.

"Far too many of us - both military and civilian - fail to admit that we were weak enough to fall into the trap of suffering from the things we saw and experienced."

Until we as a society stop referring to being human as weak, and view the suffering of others as a revenue opportunity, I don't look for much to change.
 

Fenton Lum

Gold Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
22,735
Reaction score
1,439
Points
265
Weed. Many people feel the best way is with weed.
Actually, you're not far off. I go to CO a couple of times a year for the 420 shops, and I hear LOTS of stories from fellow veterans (I always wear my Navy ballcap), who tell me that when they came back, they were on pill regimens of up to 12 pills per day and were suffering side effects from all the medication that had a bad effect on their health.

Lots of them, when CO legalized marijuana for recreational use switched over to marijuana as an alternative method to all the pills. Know what happened to all the people I've talked to? They were able to stop taking so much medicine and their health returned. The calming effect of cannabis (different people have a preference for different varieties) had helped them to deal with their PTSD.

I really think that the VA should look into this. Seriously.
I've read several articles where it is thought marijuana will be considered by the VA when Trump takes office.
Someone'll have to corral Sessions.
 

The Great Goose

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2015
Messages
13,958
Reaction score
1,226
Points
290




Far too many of us - both military and civilian - fail to admit that we were weak enough to fall into the trap of suffering from the things we saw and experienced. And, when we do, the result is that doctors generally turn to what they know, a wide variety of medications designed to supposedly ease the unseen agony.



There are other proven ways of treating PTSD.



In Sonora Symphony, A tale about alternative treatments for PTSD, I write about a soldier suffering selective amnesia from a traumatic encounter in Afghanistan. Sick and tired of the poking and prodding and incessant questions, he leaves the medical hospital having no idea where he's going. He ends up in an all-night diner outside of Tuscon, Arizona where his spirit guides place him before a Native American elder who once served as a Green Beret. The elder takes him in and, through a combination of many different methods, helps erase the deep pain and allow the painful memories to return. An unusual twist is the soldier discovers he is half-Cherokee and undergoes a vision quest that enable him to find the path back to health - and a future.



Sonora Symphony is available for reading on a Kindle or other electronic devices @ https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N8YZUDG/?tag=ff0d01-20 (as well as all the other Amazon.com outlets) or in paperback @ https://www.amazon.com/Sonora-Symph...sr=1-1&keywords=Sonora+Symphony&tag=ff0d01-20



My only request is that when you finish reading it, please return to the site and rate it or give it a brief review.



I sincerely hope that someone - if no more than one - suffering the hidden agony of PTSD finds this to be a help.
I've got it. I'm terrified all the time from the shit that's happened to me.
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,551
Reaction score
8,900
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
Weed. Many people feel the best way is with weed.
Actually, you're not far off. I go to CO a couple of times a year for the 420 shops, and I hear LOTS of stories from fellow veterans (I always wear my Navy ballcap), who tell me that when they came back, they were on pill regimens of up to 12 pills per day and were suffering side effects from all the medication that had a bad effect on their health.

Lots of them, when CO legalized marijuana for recreational use switched over to marijuana as an alternative method to all the pills. Know what happened to all the people I've talked to? They were able to stop taking so much medicine and their health returned. The calming effect of cannabis (different people have a preference for different varieties) had helped them to deal with their PTSD.

I really think that the VA should look into this. Seriously.
I've read several articles where it is thought marijuana will be considered by the VA when Trump takes office.
Someone'll have to corral Sessions.
Yep, and I don't think that Trump will be much interested in keeping Sessions at bay on this issue. Trump doesn't drink or do drugs.
 

Fenton Lum

Gold Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
22,735
Reaction score
1,439
Points
265




Far too many of us - both military and civilian - fail to admit that we were weak enough to fall into the trap of suffering from the things we saw and experienced. And, when we do, the result is that doctors generally turn to what they know, a wide variety of medications designed to supposedly ease the unseen agony.



There are other proven ways of treating PTSD.



In Sonora Symphony, A tale about alternative treatments for PTSD, I write about a soldier suffering selective amnesia from a traumatic encounter in Afghanistan. Sick and tired of the poking and prodding and incessant questions, he leaves the medical hospital having no idea where he's going. He ends up in an all-night diner outside of Tuscon, Arizona where his spirit guides place him before a Native American elder who once served as a Green Beret. The elder takes him in and, through a combination of many different methods, helps erase the deep pain and allow the painful memories to return. An unusual twist is the soldier discovers he is half-Cherokee and undergoes a vision quest that enable him to find the path back to health - and a future.



Sonora Symphony is available for reading on a Kindle or other electronic devices @ https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N8YZUDG/?tag=ff0d01-20 (as well as all the other Amazon.com outlets) or in paperback @ https://www.amazon.com/Sonora-Symph...sr=1-1&keywords=Sonora+Symphony&tag=ff0d01-20



My only request is that when you finish reading it, please return to the site and rate it or give it a brief review.



I sincerely hope that someone - if no more than one - suffering the hidden agony of PTSD finds this to be a help.
I've got it. I'm terrified all the time from the shit that's happened to me.
Yours is self-inflicted.
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,551
Reaction score
8,900
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
If you have the Vice channel on your cable provider, I highly recommend checking out a show called "Weediquette", and look for the one titled "Stoned Vets". It shows the problem of PTSD, and shows what the results are of veterans who have used marijuana as a way to treat it, as well as shows another veteran who is taking pills from the VA and is scared to try it as a treatment, because it might invalidate his health care with them (he's in a non marijuana state).

The vets that used marijuana? Marked difference between them and the dude who is getting his medication from the VA, not only in outlook, but physical appearance and health as well.

Watch that show, and see how much cannabis has helped veterans with PTSD.
 

Fenton Lum

Gold Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
22,735
Reaction score
1,439
Points
265
Weed. Many people feel the best way is with weed.
Actually, you're not far off. I go to CO a couple of times a year for the 420 shops, and I hear LOTS of stories from fellow veterans (I always wear my Navy ballcap), who tell me that when they came back, they were on pill regimens of up to 12 pills per day and were suffering side effects from all the medication that had a bad effect on their health.

Lots of them, when CO legalized marijuana for recreational use switched over to marijuana as an alternative method to all the pills. Know what happened to all the people I've talked to? They were able to stop taking so much medicine and their health returned. The calming effect of cannabis (different people have a preference for different varieties) had helped them to deal with their PTSD.

I really think that the VA should look into this. Seriously.
I've read several articles where it is thought marijuana will be considered by the VA when Trump takes office.
Someone'll have to corral Sessions.
Yep, and I don't think that Trump will be much interested in keeping Sessions at bay on this issue. Trump doesn't drink or do drugs.
For profit prison stock soared on the news of Trump's win. And in some states we've returned to convict leasing, there's your jobs coming back to america; profiting from bondage once again. Also reduces the number of eligibal voters, and you can enforce the law according to to race, as has always been done. All of that would be appealing to Trump and many of his followers, including Sessions.

Still, half of the states have legalized medicinal use, 8 states have legalized recreational use. And its turned into big business.

In U.S., 58% Back Legal Marijuana Use
 

waltky

Wise ol' monkey
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
26,211
Reaction score
2,581
Points
275
Location
Okolona, KY
New York legalizes medical marijuana for PTSD...

Veterans Key as Surge of States OK Medical Pot for PTSD
November 26, 2017 — It was a telling setting for a decision on whether post-traumatic stress disorder patients could use medical marijuana.
Against the backdrop of the nation's largest Veterans Day parade, Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced this month he'd sign legislation making New York the latest in a fast-rising tide of states to OK therapeutic pot as a PTSD treatment, though it's illegal under federal law and doesn't boast extensive, conclusive medical research. Twenty-eight states plus the District of Columbia now include PTSD in their medical marijuana programs, a tally that has more than doubled in the last two years, according to data compiled by the pro-legalization Marijuana Policy Project. A 29th state, Alaska, doesn't incorporate PTSD in its medical marijuana program but allows everyone over 20 to buy pot legally. The increase has come amid increasingly visible advocacy from veterans' groups.


Marijuana plants for sale are displayed at the medical marijuana farmers market at the California Heritage Market in Los Angeles, July 11, 2014.​

Retired Marine staff sergeant Mark DiPasquale says the drug freed him from the 17 opioids, anti-anxiety pills and other medications that were prescribed to him for migraines, post-traumatic stress and other injuries from service that included a hard helicopter landing in Iraq in 2005. "I just felt like a zombie, and I wanted to hurt somebody,'' says DiPasquale, a co-founder of the Rochester, New York-based Veterans Cannabis Collective Foundation. It aims to educate vets about the drug he pointedly calls by the scientific name cannabis. DiPasquale pushed to extend New York's nearly two-year-old medical marijuana program to include post-traumatic stress. He'd qualified because of other conditions but felt the drug ease his anxiety, sleeplessness and other PTSD symptoms and spur him to focus on wellness. "Do I still have PTSD? Absolutely,'' says DiPasquale, 42. But "I'm back to my old self. I love people again.''

Help for veterans

In a sign of how much the issue has taken hold among veterans, the 2.2-million-member American Legion began pressing the federal government this summer to let Department of Veterans Affairs doctors recommend medical marijuana where it's legal . The Legion started advocating last year for easing federal constraints on medical pot research, a departure into drug policy for the nearly century-old organization. "People ask, 'Aren't you the law-and-order group?' Why, yes, we are,'' Executive Director Verna Jones said at a Legion-arranged news conference early this month at the U.S. Capitol. But "when veterans come to us and say a particular treatment is working for them, we owe it to them to listen and to do scientific research required.''


New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signs new legislation during a signing ceremony in New York​

Even Veterans Affairs Secretary Dr. David Shulkin recently said ``there may be some evidence that this (medical marijuana) is beginning to be helpful,'' while noting that his agency is barred from helping patients get the illegal drug. (A few prescription drugs containing a synthetic version of a key chemical in marijuana do have federal approval to treat chemotherapy-related nausea.) Medical marijuana first became legal in 1996 in California for a wide range of conditions; New Mexico in 2009 became the first state specifically to include PTSD patients. States have signed on in growing numbers particularly since 2014. "It's quite a sea change,'' says Michael Krawitz, a disabled Air Force veteran who now runs Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access, an Elliston, Virginia-based group that's pursued the issue in many states. Still, there remain questions and qualms _ some from veterans _ about advocating for medical marijuana as a treatment for PTSD.

MORE
 

ABikerSailor

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
48,551
Reaction score
8,900
Points
2,040
Location
Amarillo TX
Thanks for the post and the article Waltky. It proves what I said about vets when they shift from medicine with the VA to marijuana.

They are able to greatly reduce the amount of pills they take as well as get a lot healthier.
 

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top