Thousands of bikers heading to South Dakota rally to be blocked at tribal land checkpoints

Asclepias

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The blanket asses didn't fare too well back in the day when they tried keep out the Cowboys.
I expect the Indian's won't do any better when they tangle with the Bikers. ... :cool:
They sure killed alot of the US military. A couple of punks on bikes shouldnt be too hard to mop up.

You are fake history.
I bet the Hells Angels dont think so. Thats why they are doing exactly what they were told to do.
So fucking stupid.
I bet most Angels are way smarter than you plus I'm positive they would kick your ass for calling them stupid.
 

Asclepias

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
 

esalla

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

 

Asclepias

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

 

toobfreak

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."
Lucky for the Sioux that most bikers are conservative and not democrats. They will probably RESPECT their wishes and just turn home elsewhere.

If they were Democrats, they would invade, riot and destroy.
 

esalla

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

Sure it does

 

RetiredGySgt

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It is ILLEGAL to block Federal or State roads the Tribes do not own the roads. I support any State or Federal action against any tribe that breaks the law.
 

Asclepias

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

Sure it does

False.



 

Tipsycatlover

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It is ILLEGAL to block Federal or State roads the Tribes do not own the roads. I support any State or Federal action against any tribe that breaks the law.
No tribe has any authority over federal highways. I can just see the Morongos closing down I10. It's not happening.
 

Abbey

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The blanket asses didn't fare too well back in the day when they tried keep out the Cowboys.
I expect the Indian's won't do any better when they tangle with the Bikers. ... :cool:
They sure killed alot of the US military. A couple of punks on bikes shouldnt be too hard to mop up.
Have you seen today's native Americans? Most are fat and lazy.
 

esalla

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

Sure it does

False.



There are 5.6 million American Indians and Alaska Natives, collectively known as Native Americans, currently living in the United States.1 Although they only make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, Native Americans experience substance abuse and addiction at much higher rates than other ethnic groups. Alcohol Abuse among Native Americans
Alcohol is the most commonly used drug among Native Americans, although the rate of alcohol use among Native Americans is lower than among Caucasians, Hispanics, and African Americans. The major concerns of alcohol use stem from the high rates of problem drinking and alcoholism among Native Americans. Findings from the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health include:2
  • The rate of past month (35.9%) and past year (54.3%) alcohol use among Native Americans is significantly higher than other ethnic groups.
  • Nearly a quarter of Native Americans report binge drinking in the past month (22.4%).
  • The rate of Native Americans with an alcohol use disorder (7.1%) is higher than that of the total population (5.4%).
  • 3 in 10 Native American young adults (age 18-25) report binge drinking (consuming 5 or more drinks in 2 hours), 1 in 11 report heavy alcohol use (binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month), and 1 in 10 have an alcohol use disorder.
  • 1 in 6 Native American adolescents (age 12-17) engage in underage drinking, the highest rate of alcohol use of all racial/ethnic groups.
Consequences of Alcohol Abuse in Native American Communities
Alcohol can have a severe impact on the health of Native American individuals, families, and communities. The consequences of alcohol abuse for Native Americans include increased risks for heart disease, cancer, gastrointestinal problems, pneumonia, tuberculosis, dental problems, hearing and vision problems, depression, and other mental health disorders.3 A recent analysis found that alcoholic liver disease is a major leading cause of death for Native Americans.4 Alcohol use is also a major cause of preventable birth defects and developmental disabilities in Native Americans, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting that the rate of fetal alcohol syndrome among some tribes is more than eight times the national average.5 Alcohol use leads to increased risk for unintentional injuries, including those resulting from poor decision making and risky behaviors. Studies show that Native American men have the second-highest self-reported rates of driving under the influence, as well as the second highest arrest rates for drunk driving, compared to men from other racial and ethnic groups.6 Alcohol also contributes to the harm that many Native Americans suffer as a result of violence. Studies show that alcohol is involved in more than 6 in 10 violent crimes committed by Native Americans, and nearly half of the violent crimes experienced by Native Americans involve alcohol.7


 

Asclepias

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Asclepias

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The blanket asses didn't fare too well back in the day when they tried keep out the Cowboys.
I expect the Indian's won't do any better when they tangle with the Bikers. ... :cool:
They sure killed alot of the US military. A couple of punks on bikes shouldnt be too hard to mop up.
Have you seen today's native Americans? Most are fat and lazy.
Obviously you hang around the fat ones.
 

Asclepias

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

Sure it does

False.



There are 5.6 million American Indians and Alaska Natives, collectively known as Native Americans, currently living in the United States.1 Although they only make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, Native Americans experience substance abuse and addiction at much higher rates than other ethnic groups. Alcohol Abuse among Native Americans
Alcohol is the most commonly used drug among Native Americans, although the rate of alcohol use among Native Americans is lower than among Caucasians, Hispanics, and African Americans. The major concerns of alcohol use stem from the high rates of problem drinking and alcoholism among Native Americans. Findings from the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health include:2
  • The rate of past month (35.9%) and past year (54.3%) alcohol use among Native Americans is significantly higher than other ethnic groups.
  • Nearly a quarter of Native Americans report binge drinking in the past month (22.4%).
  • The rate of Native Americans with an alcohol use disorder (7.1%) is higher than that of the total population (5.4%).
  • 3 in 10 Native American young adults (age 18-25) report binge drinking (consuming 5 or more drinks in 2 hours), 1 in 11 report heavy alcohol use (binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month), and 1 in 10 have an alcohol use disorder.
  • 1 in 6 Native American adolescents (age 12-17) engage in underage drinking, the highest rate of alcohol use of all racial/ethnic groups.
Consequences of Alcohol Abuse in Native American Communities
Alcohol can have a severe impact on the health of Native American individuals, families, and communities. The consequences of alcohol abuse for Native Americans include increased risks for heart disease, cancer, gastrointestinal problems, pneumonia, tuberculosis, dental problems, hearing and vision problems, depression, and other mental health disorders.3 A recent analysis found that alcoholic liver disease is a major leading cause of death for Native Americans.4 Alcohol use is also a major cause of preventable birth defects and developmental disabilities in Native Americans, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting that the rate of fetal alcohol syndrome among some tribes is more than eight times the national average.5 Alcohol use leads to increased risk for unintentional injuries, including those resulting from poor decision making and risky behaviors. Studies show that Native American men have the second-highest self-reported rates of driving under the influence, as well as the second highest arrest rates for drunk driving, compared to men from other racial and ethnic groups.6 Alcohol also contributes to the harm that many Native Americans suffer as a result of violence. Studies show that alcohol is involved in more than 6 in 10 violent crimes committed by Native Americans, and nearly half of the violent crimes experienced by Native Americans involve alcohol.7


Not sure how that proves your point. You guys are addicted to crack, meth, and opioids but I wouldnt use that to con you with.
 

Disir

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

Sure it does




 
Last edited:

esalla

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Well now..wonder what will happen when the Native Americans decide to exercise their sovereignty? The Sioux have erected checkpoints at the Cheyenne River....turning the bikers back.

No so social distancing?


"A convoy consisting of thousands of bikers headed for a South Dakota rally will not be allowed to cross Cheyenne River Sioux checkpoints on their way to the event, according to a Native American spokesman.
The spokesman said Saturday that the band of travelers would be stopped on their way to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, in the name of preventing coronavirus from spreading any further.
The seven tribes that make up the Sioux Nation are now in a fight with federal and state officials, who deemed such checkpoints to be illegal.

A duty officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux told the Guardian Saturday that commercial and emergency vehicles will be allowed through the checkpoints, but nothing else. Some reservations have reportedly turned away bikers already."

View attachment 373126
All the bikers need is some Jack Daniels and the drunken injuns will let them through
The firewater trick doesnt work anymore.
Yea it does

No...it doesnt.

Sure it does

False.



There are 5.6 million American Indians and Alaska Natives, collectively known as Native Americans, currently living in the United States.1 Although they only make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, Native Americans experience substance abuse and addiction at much higher rates than other ethnic groups. Alcohol Abuse among Native Americans
Alcohol is the most commonly used drug among Native Americans, although the rate of alcohol use among Native Americans is lower than among Caucasians, Hispanics, and African Americans. The major concerns of alcohol use stem from the high rates of problem drinking and alcoholism among Native Americans. Findings from the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health include:2
  • The rate of past month (35.9%) and past year (54.3%) alcohol use among Native Americans is significantly higher than other ethnic groups.
  • Nearly a quarter of Native Americans report binge drinking in the past month (22.4%).
  • The rate of Native Americans with an alcohol use disorder (7.1%) is higher than that of the total population (5.4%).
  • 3 in 10 Native American young adults (age 18-25) report binge drinking (consuming 5 or more drinks in 2 hours), 1 in 11 report heavy alcohol use (binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month), and 1 in 10 have an alcohol use disorder.
  • 1 in 6 Native American adolescents (age 12-17) engage in underage drinking, the highest rate of alcohol use of all racial/ethnic groups.
Consequences of Alcohol Abuse in Native American Communities
Alcohol can have a severe impact on the health of Native American individuals, families, and communities. The consequences of alcohol abuse for Native Americans include increased risks for heart disease, cancer, gastrointestinal problems, pneumonia, tuberculosis, dental problems, hearing and vision problems, depression, and other mental health disorders.3 A recent analysis found that alcoholic liver disease is a major leading cause of death for Native Americans.4 Alcohol use is also a major cause of preventable birth defects and developmental disabilities in Native Americans, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting that the rate of fetal alcohol syndrome among some tribes is more than eight times the national average.5 Alcohol use leads to increased risk for unintentional injuries, including those resulting from poor decision making and risky behaviors. Studies show that Native American men have the second-highest self-reported rates of driving under the influence, as well as the second highest arrest rates for drunk driving, compared to men from other racial and ethnic groups.6 Alcohol also contributes to the harm that many Native Americans suffer as a result of violence. Studies show that alcohol is involved in more than 6 in 10 violent crimes committed by Native Americans, and nearly half of the violent crimes experienced by Native Americans involve alcohol.7


Not sure how that proves your point. You guys are addicted to crack, meth, and opioids but I wouldnt use that to con you with.

The Methamphetamine Crisis in American Indian and Native Alaskan Communities



The prevalence of methamphetamine (ME) use among American Indians and Native Alaskans (AI/NAs) is strikingly high in comparison to other ethnic groups in the U.S. (Iritani, Dion Hallfors & Bauer, 2007). However, few datasets are available that allow for estimates to characterize the problem or describe the variation of the ME problem among tribes. Only recently has anecdotal information emerged about the spread of ME use and manufacture into tribal communities in newspapers, radio stories, wire services, agency reports, and on websites. Due to the lack of stable data and other unique problems of rural populations, multi-agency approaches that include counties, states, federal law enforcement agencies, and other institutions to combat ME use, distribution, and production, have been difficult to organize. In order to develop optimal responses to this crisis, it is necessary to better understand the extent of the problem and the various factors that lead to ME abuse. Research and data collection collaborations between federal and tribal professionals working in the areas of law enforcement, social services, drug court system, domestic violence, services for children, mental health, prosecution, juvenile justice, housing, and addictions are needed to curb this devastating problem (Bubar, Winokur & Bartlemay, 2007).
 

Disir

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Maxdeath

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You can tell the uninformed on this thread. There are just as many lawyers, doctors and everyone else at that rally as there is biker gangs.
got to love the crazies that are so excited that the tribe is making the bikers go around their land. It’s not like they are going to stop the rally and they certainly are not going to shoot anyone. But the left is all about violence.
The right was was the first to mention violence but nice try.


" Maybe the Angels will just go straight through, and see if the Indians are tough enough to stop them? "
So they were the ones throwing drinks on people for wearing a cap? They are out rioting and looting?
They who?
Ok I can see your not very bright so I will walk you through it all. First off driving through a checkpoint is not exactly a violent act, nor was the person who stated it suggesting violence.
as far as “they” I was suggesting that the right has not been rioting nor attacking people for wearing a cap.
 

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