The Stone Cold Truth

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bullwinkle

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I have not been a part of the reasons for black discontent. But as a youth...

You sure?

How many mornings so far did you awake and say, as you exited your home, "Even tho I live in America that is controlled by us Caucasoid people, I think just for today, I am going to denounce my White Privilege in every place I go to. Just for today I am going to see what it is like for negroid people, everyday, navigating through a country which shits on their Rights & citizenry at every chance ---since 1863 and especially since 1964!" .... I would say, none. As in, I bet it has been zero times you awake on a morning to say that as you went out into a White-controlled society each day.

Now if you do, say that, then also live it each day? Everytime you exit your home as you go out into the world??--like a Rochelle Dolezal or Steph Curry or Jesse Williams or Jennifer Hoshchilds?? Then yes, you are correct that you are not any part of the reason for black discontent.
I am not black and I can't be black or the caricature of black you suggest as Rochelle or Steph or the rest. All I can do is speak against racism in an effort to get rid of it. My intent is to bring black people into real equality, not put white people down. And there are plenty of black persons who do that already, better than you or I.
 

squeeze berry

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Yeah, those Democrats were real bastards, eh?
IM2 tries to present himself as a black activist, yet he constantly sucks jackass party of slavery and Jim Crow dick. Just slurps up every drop.
Lol! Republicans owned slaves and republicans enforced Jim Crow. Just like the democrats.

It was a 7-1 decision that created Jim Crow. Four of the supreme court judges voting in favor of separate but equal were republicans.
it was the US., Britain and France that ended the transatlantic slave trade.
Why not direct your anger toward the black Africans, the sellers whose economy depended on the slave trade, unless you are a racist?
 

squeeze berry

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I have not been a part of the reasons for black discontent. But as a youth...

You sure?

How many mornings so far did you awake and say, as you exited your home, "Even tho I live in America that is controlled by us Caucasoid people, I think just for today, I am going to denounce my White Privilege in every place I go to. Just for today I am going to see what it is like for negroid people, everyday, navigating through a country which shits on their Rights & citizenry at every chance ---since 1863 and especially since 1964!" .... I would say, none. As in, I bet it has been zero times you awake on a morning to say that as you went out into a White-controlled society each day.

Now if you do, say that, then also live it each day? Everytime you exit your home as you go out into the world??--like a Rochelle Dolezal or Steph Curry or Jesse Williams or Jennifer Hoshchilds?? Then yes, you are correct that you are not any part of the reason for black discontent.
I am not black and I can't be black or the caricature of black you suggest as Rochelle or Steph or the rest. All I can do is speak against racism in an effort to get rid of it. My intent is to bring black people into real equality, not put white people down. And there are plenty of black persons who do that already, better than you or I.

what rights do "black people" not have in the US?
 

Ethos Logos Pathos

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what rights do "black people" not have in the US?
If you reeeally gotta ask ... then, you juuuuust might be an involuntary force helping to deny those Rights to negro citizens.

iow it's not about what rights do "black people" not have in the US ---but it is about the Dred Scot Rule
 
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IM2

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Nah. I'm a black man telling truth that whites like you don't have the maturity to deal with.
Getting off of the lake of anti love .....near everyone wants to live a comfortable life. A comfortable life with as few problems and issues as possible. Maybe one day we will achieve it. I know we can do better then what we have today for a greater amount of people.
Yep and that life with fewer problems for people of color includes whites that stop being racists.
 

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IM2

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Let us continue with the years after slavery and what it meant for blacks.

Thus far we see that whites went on a killing spree that can only be described as attempted ethnic cleansing. After that, the supreme court pretty much killed the 13th,14th, and 15th amendments by saying that issues of racial discrimination was not a federal concern. So let us move forward with more of the stone cold truth.

The Colfax Massacre (1873)

The Colfax Massacre occurred on April 13, 1873. The battle-turned-massacre took place in the small town of Colfax, Louisiana as a clash between blacks and whites. Three whites and an estimated 150 blacks died in the conflict.

The massacre took place against the backdrop of racial tensions following the hotly contested Louisiana governor’s race of 1872. While the Republicans narrowly won the contest and retained control of the state, white Democrats, angry over the defeat, vowed revenge. In Colfax Parish (county) as in other areas of the state, they organized a white militia to directly challenge the mostly black state militia under the control of the governor.

One incident however, touched off the Colfax massacre. On March 28, local white Democratic leaders called for armed supporters to help them take the Colfax Parish Courthouse from the black and white GOP officeholders on April 1. The Republicans responded by urging their mostly black supporters to defend them. Although nothing happened on April 1, the next day fighting erupted between the two groups.

On April 13, Easter Sunday, more than 300 armed white men, including members of white supremacist organizations such as the Knights of White Camellia and the Ku Klux Klan, attacked the Courthouse building. When the militia maneuvered a cannon to fire on the Courthouse, some of the sixty black defenders fled while others surrendered. When the leader of the attackers, James Hadnot, was accidentally shot by one of his own men, the white militia responded by shooting the black prisoners. Those who were wounded in the earlier battle, particularly black militia members, were singled out for execution The indiscriminate killing spread to African Americans who had not been at the courthouse and continued into the night.

All told, approximately 150 African Americans were killed, including 48 who were murdered after the battle. Only three whites were killed, and few were injured in the largely one-sided battle of Colfax.

The Colfax Massacre (1873) •

So what did the US government do to provide equal protection to newly freed blacks?



U.S. v. Cruikshank

March 27, 1876
The Cruikshank case arose from the 1873 Colfax Massacre, in which a group of armed whites killed more than a hundred African American men as a result of a political dispute. Three men convicted of violating the 1870 Enforcement Act – a law aimed primarily at curbing Ku Klux Klan violence that forbade conspiracies to deny the constitutional rights of any citizen – appealed on the grounds that their indictments were insufficient. When the case reached the Supreme Court, the Court sided with the defendants, holding that the rights they were alleged to have violated were not enforceable in this case. The First and Second Amendment rights to assembly and the bearing of arms were, according to the Court’s ruling, intended only to restrict the actions of the federal government and did not apply to the states or private citizens, and the Fourteenth Amendment rights to due process and equal protection applied only to state action and again, not to the actions of individuals.

https://www.fjc.gov/history/timeline/us-v-cruikshank

Once again Chief Justice Waite, a REPUBLICAN:

Chief Justice Morrison Waite overturned the convictions of the defendants, holding that the plaintiffs had to rely on state courts for protection. Waite ruled that neither the First Amendment nor the Second Amendment applied to the actions of state governments or to individuals. He further ruled that the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment applied to the actions of state governments, but not to individuals. The decision left African Americans in the South at the mercy of increasingly hostile state governments dominated by white Democratic legislatures, and allowed groups such as the Ku Klux Klan to continue to use paramilitary force to suppress black voting.

United States v. Cruikshank - Wikipedia

upload_2020-1-25_22-34-23.jpeg
 

Sun Devil 92

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Let us continue with the years after slavery and what it meant for blacks.

Thus far we see that whites went on a killing spree that can only be described as attempted ethnic cleansing. After that, the supreme court pretty much killed the 13th,14th, and 15th amendments by saying that issues of racial discrimination was not a federal concern. So let us move forward with more of the stone cold truth.

The Colfax Massacre (1873)

The Colfax Massacre occurred on April 13, 1873. The battle-turned-massacre took place in the small town of Colfax, Louisiana as a clash between blacks and whites. Three whites and an estimated 150 blacks died in the conflict.

The massacre took place against the backdrop of racial tensions following the hotly contested Louisiana governor’s race of 1872. While the Republicans narrowly won the contest and retained control of the state, white Democrats, angry over the defeat, vowed revenge. In Colfax Parish (county) as in other areas of the state, they organized a white militia to directly challenge the mostly black state militia under the control of the governor.

One incident however, touched off the Colfax massacre. On March 28, local white Democratic leaders called for armed supporters to help them take the Colfax Parish Courthouse from the black and white GOP officeholders on April 1. The Republicans responded by urging their mostly black supporters to defend them. Although nothing happened on April 1, the next day fighting erupted between the two groups.

On April 13, Easter Sunday, more than 300 armed white men, including members of white supremacist organizations such as the Knights of White Camellia and the Ku Klux Klan, attacked the Courthouse building. When the militia maneuvered a cannon to fire on the Courthouse, some of the sixty black defenders fled while others surrendered. When the leader of the attackers, James Hadnot, was accidentally shot by one of his own men, the white militia responded by shooting the black prisoners. Those who were wounded in the earlier battle, particularly black militia members, were singled out for execution The indiscriminate killing spread to African Americans who had not been at the courthouse and continued into the night.

All told, approximately 150 African Americans were killed, including 48 who were murdered after the battle. Only three whites were killed, and few were injured in the largely one-sided battle of Colfax.

The Colfax Massacre (1873) •

So what did the US government do to provide equal protection to newly freed blacks?



U.S. v. Cruikshank

March 27, 1876
The Cruikshank case arose from the 1873 Colfax Massacre, in which a group of armed whites killed more than a hundred African American men as a result of a political dispute. Three men convicted of violating the 1870 Enforcement Act – a law aimed primarily at curbing Ku Klux Klan violence that forbade conspiracies to deny the constitutional rights of any citizen – appealed on the grounds that their indictments were insufficient. When the case reached the Supreme Court, the Court sided with the defendants, holding that the rights they were alleged to have violated were not enforceable in this case. The First and Second Amendment rights to assembly and the bearing of arms were, according to the Court’s ruling, intended only to restrict the actions of the federal government and did not apply to the states or private citizens, and the Fourteenth Amendment rights to due process and equal protection applied only to state action and again, not to the actions of individuals.

https://www.fjc.gov/history/timeline/us-v-cruikshank

Once again Chief Justice Waite, a REPUBLICAN:

Chief Justice Morrison Waite overturned the convictions of the defendants, holding that the plaintiffs had to rely on state courts for protection. Waite ruled that neither the First Amendment nor the Second Amendment applied to the actions of state governments or to individuals. He further ruled that the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment applied to the actions of state governments, but not to individuals. The decision left African Americans in the South at the mercy of increasingly hostile state governments dominated by white Democratic legislatures, and allowed groups such as the Ku Klux Klan to continue to use paramilitary force to suppress black voting.

United States v. Cruikshank - Wikipedia

You made a mistake....this says 1876.

I suspect you are not still butthurt over something that happened 150 years ago.

Are you ?
 

deannalw

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It's now time to look at the cold, hard, graphic reality of what racism by whites has entailed. The information used in this thread will come from the book, "White Rage," by Dr. Carol Anderson.

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
National Book Critics Circle Award Winner
New York Times Bestseller
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year
A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016
A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016


From the end of the Civil War to our combustible present, an acclaimed historian reframes the conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.

Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate, relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court’s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans.

White Rage — Carol Anderson

Starting with my next post, you will be shown in graphic detail the steps whites took to deprive blacks of equal rights and freedom after slavery ended up until our lifetimes. The root cause of the problems blacks face is white racism. That's a fact and it's time people faced that fact.


You'll still be cryin when you die.
 
OP
IM2

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"I am not black and I can't be black or the caricature of black you suggest as Rochelle or Steph or the rest. All I can do is speak against racism in an effort to get rid of it. My intent is to bring black people into real equality, not put white people down. And there are plenty of black persons who do that already, better than you or I."

This is not about putting white people down. It is about creating a full and complete understanding of what whites that practice racism do and what damage has been and continues to be done by it's continued practice.
 

Sun Devil 92

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"I am not black and I can't be black or the caricature of black you suggest as Rochelle or Steph or the rest. All I can do is speak against racism in an effort to get rid of it. My intent is to bring black people into real equality, not put white people down. And there are plenty of black persons who do that already, better than you or I."

This is not about putting white people down. It is about creating a full and complete understanding of what whites that practice racism do and what damage has been and continues to be done by it's continued practice.
And everyone who does not agree with you is a racist.

Racist being an opinion that you are better than someone because of skin color.

So people can't simply disagree with you.
 
OP
IM2

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Let us continue with the years after slavery and what it meant for blacks.

Thus far we see that whites went on a killing spree that can only be described as attempted ethnic cleansing. After that, the supreme court pretty much killed the 13th,14th, and 15th amendments by saying that issues of racial discrimination was not a federal concern. So let us move forward with more of the stone cold truth.

The Colfax Massacre (1873)

The Colfax Massacre occurred on April 13, 1873. The battle-turned-massacre took place in the small town of Colfax, Louisiana as a clash between blacks and whites. Three whites and an estimated 150 blacks died in the conflict.

The massacre took place against the backdrop of racial tensions following the hotly contested Louisiana governor’s race of 1872. While the Republicans narrowly won the contest and retained control of the state, white Democrats, angry over the defeat, vowed revenge. In Colfax Parish (county) as in other areas of the state, they organized a white militia to directly challenge the mostly black state militia under the control of the governor.

One incident however, touched off the Colfax massacre. On March 28, local white Democratic leaders called for armed supporters to help them take the Colfax Parish Courthouse from the black and white GOP officeholders on April 1. The Republicans responded by urging their mostly black supporters to defend them. Although nothing happened on April 1, the next day fighting erupted between the two groups.

On April 13, Easter Sunday, more than 300 armed white men, including members of white supremacist organizations such as the Knights of White Camellia and the Ku Klux Klan, attacked the Courthouse building. When the militia maneuvered a cannon to fire on the Courthouse, some of the sixty black defenders fled while others surrendered. When the leader of the attackers, James Hadnot, was accidentally shot by one of his own men, the white militia responded by shooting the black prisoners. Those who were wounded in the earlier battle, particularly black militia members, were singled out for execution The indiscriminate killing spread to African Americans who had not been at the courthouse and continued into the night.

All told, approximately 150 African Americans were killed, including 48 who were murdered after the battle. Only three whites were killed, and few were injured in the largely one-sided battle of Colfax.

The Colfax Massacre (1873) •

So what did the US government do to provide equal protection to newly freed blacks?



U.S. v. Cruikshank

March 27, 1876
The Cruikshank case arose from the 1873 Colfax Massacre, in which a group of armed whites killed more than a hundred African American men as a result of a political dispute. Three men convicted of violating the 1870 Enforcement Act – a law aimed primarily at curbing Ku Klux Klan violence that forbade conspiracies to deny the constitutional rights of any citizen – appealed on the grounds that their indictments were insufficient. When the case reached the Supreme Court, the Court sided with the defendants, holding that the rights they were alleged to have violated were not enforceable in this case. The First and Second Amendment rights to assembly and the bearing of arms were, according to the Court’s ruling, intended only to restrict the actions of the federal government and did not apply to the states or private citizens, and the Fourteenth Amendment rights to due process and equal protection applied only to state action and again, not to the actions of individuals.

https://www.fjc.gov/history/timeline/us-v-cruikshank

Once again Chief Justice Waite, a REPUBLICAN:

Chief Justice Morrison Waite overturned the convictions of the defendants, holding that the plaintiffs had to rely on state courts for protection. Waite ruled that neither the First Amendment nor the Second Amendment applied to the actions of state governments or to individuals. He further ruled that the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment applied to the actions of state governments, but not to individuals. The decision left African Americans in the South at the mercy of increasingly hostile state governments dominated by white Democratic legislatures, and allowed groups such as the Ku Klux Klan to continue to use paramilitary force to suppress black voting.

United States v. Cruikshank - Wikipedia

You made a mistake....this says 1876.

I suspect you are not still butthurt over something that happened 150 years ago.

Are you ?
No there is no mistake. You still celebrate something that happened in 1776, hold men and their ideas as sacred who have been dead 200 years. So this review of how blacks have been treated from the end of slavery until this moment is going to be done.
 
OP
IM2

IM2

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"I am not black and I can't be black or the caricature of black you suggest as Rochelle or Steph or the rest. All I can do is speak against racism in an effort to get rid of it. My intent is to bring black people into real equality, not put white people down. And there are plenty of black persons who do that already, better than you or I."

This is not about putting white people down. It is about creating a full and complete understanding of what whites that practice racism do and what damage has been and continues to be done by it's continued practice.
And everyone who does not agree with you is a racist.

Racist being an opinion that you are better than someone because of skin color.

So people can't simply disagree with you.
Wrong. Just stop whining because you're going to be shown what has been done to us since slavery ended whether you like it or not.
 

Sun Devil 92

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Let us continue with the years after slavery and what it meant for blacks.

Thus far we see that whites went on a killing spree that can only be described as attempted ethnic cleansing. After that, the supreme court pretty much killed the 13th,14th, and 15th amendments by saying that issues of racial discrimination was not a federal concern. So let us move forward with more of the stone cold truth.

The Colfax Massacre (1873)

The Colfax Massacre occurred on April 13, 1873. The battle-turned-massacre took place in the small town of Colfax, Louisiana as a clash between blacks and whites. Three whites and an estimated 150 blacks died in the conflict.

The massacre took place against the backdrop of racial tensions following the hotly contested Louisiana governor’s race of 1872. While the Republicans narrowly won the contest and retained control of the state, white Democrats, angry over the defeat, vowed revenge. In Colfax Parish (county) as in other areas of the state, they organized a white militia to directly challenge the mostly black state militia under the control of the governor.

One incident however, touched off the Colfax massacre. On March 28, local white Democratic leaders called for armed supporters to help them take the Colfax Parish Courthouse from the black and white GOP officeholders on April 1. The Republicans responded by urging their mostly black supporters to defend them. Although nothing happened on April 1, the next day fighting erupted between the two groups.

On April 13, Easter Sunday, more than 300 armed white men, including members of white supremacist organizations such as the Knights of White Camellia and the Ku Klux Klan, attacked the Courthouse building. When the militia maneuvered a cannon to fire on the Courthouse, some of the sixty black defenders fled while others surrendered. When the leader of the attackers, James Hadnot, was accidentally shot by one of his own men, the white militia responded by shooting the black prisoners. Those who were wounded in the earlier battle, particularly black militia members, were singled out for execution The indiscriminate killing spread to African Americans who had not been at the courthouse and continued into the night.

All told, approximately 150 African Americans were killed, including 48 who were murdered after the battle. Only three whites were killed, and few were injured in the largely one-sided battle of Colfax.

The Colfax Massacre (1873) •

So what did the US government do to provide equal protection to newly freed blacks?



U.S. v. Cruikshank

March 27, 1876
The Cruikshank case arose from the 1873 Colfax Massacre, in which a group of armed whites killed more than a hundred African American men as a result of a political dispute. Three men convicted of violating the 1870 Enforcement Act – a law aimed primarily at curbing Ku Klux Klan violence that forbade conspiracies to deny the constitutional rights of any citizen – appealed on the grounds that their indictments were insufficient. When the case reached the Supreme Court, the Court sided with the defendants, holding that the rights they were alleged to have violated were not enforceable in this case. The First and Second Amendment rights to assembly and the bearing of arms were, according to the Court’s ruling, intended only to restrict the actions of the federal government and did not apply to the states or private citizens, and the Fourteenth Amendment rights to due process and equal protection applied only to state action and again, not to the actions of individuals.

https://www.fjc.gov/history/timeline/us-v-cruikshank

Once again Chief Justice Waite, a REPUBLICAN:

Chief Justice Morrison Waite overturned the convictions of the defendants, holding that the plaintiffs had to rely on state courts for protection. Waite ruled that neither the First Amendment nor the Second Amendment applied to the actions of state governments or to individuals. He further ruled that the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment applied to the actions of state governments, but not to individuals. The decision left African Americans in the South at the mercy of increasingly hostile state governments dominated by white Democratic legislatures, and allowed groups such as the Ku Klux Klan to continue to use paramilitary force to suppress black voting.

United States v. Cruikshank - Wikipedia

You made a mistake....this says 1876.

I suspect you are not still butthurt over something that happened 150 years ago.

Are you ?
No there is no mistake. You still celebrate something that happened in 1776, hold men and their ideas as sacred who have been dead 200 years. So this review of how blacks have been treated from the end of slavery until this moment is going to be done.
There is no comparison.

You are simply obsessed and you are most definitely a racist.
 
OP
IM2

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It's now time to look at the cold, hard, graphic reality of what racism by whites has entailed. The information used in this thread will come from the book, "White Rage," by Dr. Carol Anderson.

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
National Book Critics Circle Award Winner
New York Times Bestseller
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year
A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016
A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016


From the end of the Civil War to our combustible present, an acclaimed historian reframes the conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.

Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate, relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court’s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans.

White Rage — Carol Anderson

Starting with my next post, you will be shown in graphic detail the steps whites took to deprive blacks of equal rights and freedom after slavery ended up until our lifetimes. The root cause of the problems blacks face is white racism. That's a fact and it's time people faced that fact.


You'll still be cryin when you die.
You still celebrate something that happened in 1776, hold men and their ideas as sacred who have been dead 200 years. STFU
 

Sun Devil 92

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"I am not black and I can't be black or the caricature of black you suggest as Rochelle or Steph or the rest. All I can do is speak against racism in an effort to get rid of it. My intent is to bring black people into real equality, not put white people down. And there are plenty of black persons who do that already, better than you or I."

This is not about putting white people down. It is about creating a full and complete understanding of what whites that practice racism do and what damage has been and continues to be done by it's continued practice.
And everyone who does not agree with you is a racist.

Racist being an opinion that you are better than someone because of skin color.

So people can't simply disagree with you.
Wrong. Just stop whining because you're going to be shown what has been done to us since slavery ended whether you like it or not.
Oh really,

By who ? You ?

Like I take a racist like you seriously.
 
OP
IM2

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Let us continue with the years after slavery and what it meant for blacks.

Thus far we see that whites went on a killing spree that can only be described as attempted ethnic cleansing. After that, the supreme court pretty much killed the 13th,14th, and 15th amendments by saying that issues of racial discrimination was not a federal concern. So let us move forward with more of the stone cold truth.

The Colfax Massacre (1873)

The Colfax Massacre occurred on April 13, 1873. The battle-turned-massacre took place in the small town of Colfax, Louisiana as a clash between blacks and whites. Three whites and an estimated 150 blacks died in the conflict.

The massacre took place against the backdrop of racial tensions following the hotly contested Louisiana governor’s race of 1872. While the Republicans narrowly won the contest and retained control of the state, white Democrats, angry over the defeat, vowed revenge. In Colfax Parish (county) as in other areas of the state, they organized a white militia to directly challenge the mostly black state militia under the control of the governor.

One incident however, touched off the Colfax massacre. On March 28, local white Democratic leaders called for armed supporters to help them take the Colfax Parish Courthouse from the black and white GOP officeholders on April 1. The Republicans responded by urging their mostly black supporters to defend them. Although nothing happened on April 1, the next day fighting erupted between the two groups.

On April 13, Easter Sunday, more than 300 armed white men, including members of white supremacist organizations such as the Knights of White Camellia and the Ku Klux Klan, attacked the Courthouse building. When the militia maneuvered a cannon to fire on the Courthouse, some of the sixty black defenders fled while others surrendered. When the leader of the attackers, James Hadnot, was accidentally shot by one of his own men, the white militia responded by shooting the black prisoners. Those who were wounded in the earlier battle, particularly black militia members, were singled out for execution The indiscriminate killing spread to African Americans who had not been at the courthouse and continued into the night.

All told, approximately 150 African Americans were killed, including 48 who were murdered after the battle. Only three whites were killed, and few were injured in the largely one-sided battle of Colfax.

The Colfax Massacre (1873) •

So what did the US government do to provide equal protection to newly freed blacks?



U.S. v. Cruikshank

March 27, 1876
The Cruikshank case arose from the 1873 Colfax Massacre, in which a group of armed whites killed more than a hundred African American men as a result of a political dispute. Three men convicted of violating the 1870 Enforcement Act – a law aimed primarily at curbing Ku Klux Klan violence that forbade conspiracies to deny the constitutional rights of any citizen – appealed on the grounds that their indictments were insufficient. When the case reached the Supreme Court, the Court sided with the defendants, holding that the rights they were alleged to have violated were not enforceable in this case. The First and Second Amendment rights to assembly and the bearing of arms were, according to the Court’s ruling, intended only to restrict the actions of the federal government and did not apply to the states or private citizens, and the Fourteenth Amendment rights to due process and equal protection applied only to state action and again, not to the actions of individuals.

https://www.fjc.gov/history/timeline/us-v-cruikshank

Once again Chief Justice Waite, a REPUBLICAN:

Chief Justice Morrison Waite overturned the convictions of the defendants, holding that the plaintiffs had to rely on state courts for protection. Waite ruled that neither the First Amendment nor the Second Amendment applied to the actions of state governments or to individuals. He further ruled that the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment applied to the actions of state governments, but not to individuals. The decision left African Americans in the South at the mercy of increasingly hostile state governments dominated by white Democratic legislatures, and allowed groups such as the Ku Klux Klan to continue to use paramilitary force to suppress black voting.

United States v. Cruikshank - Wikipedia

You made a mistake....this says 1876.

I suspect you are not still butthurt over something that happened 150 years ago.

Are you ?
No there is no mistake. You still celebrate something that happened in 1776, hold men and their ideas as sacred who have been dead 200 years. So this review of how blacks have been treated from the end of slavery until this moment is going to be done.
There is no comparison.

You are simply obsessed and you are most definitely a racist.
 
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It's now time to look at the cold, hard, graphic reality of what racism by whites has entailed. The information used in this thread will come from the book, "White Rage," by Dr. Carol Anderson.

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
National Book Critics Circle Award Winner
New York Times Bestseller
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year
A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016
A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016


From the end of the Civil War to our combustible present, an acclaimed historian reframes the conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.

Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate, relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court’s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans.

White Rage — Carol Anderson

Starting with my next post, you will be shown in graphic detail the steps whites took to deprive blacks of equal rights and freedom after slavery ended up until our lifetimes. The root cause of the problems blacks face is white racism. That's a fact and it's time people faced that fact.






You poor sick puppy.
 
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