The Grifter at work

eddiew37

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
10,980
Reaction score
1,935
Points
275
Trump entertained plan to install an attorney general who would help him pursue baseless election fraud claims
Then-President Donald Trump in early January entertained a plan to replace the acting attorney general with a different Justice Department lawyer who was more amenable to pursuing his unfounded claims of voter fraud, nearly touching off a crisis at the country’s premier federal law enforcement institution, people familiar with the matter said.

The plan — if enacted — would have pushed out Jeffrey Rosen as the acting attorney general and installed in his place Jeffrey Clark, whom Trump had appointed to lead the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division and who later would come to lead the Civil Division. Clark, then, could have taken steps to wield the Justice Department’s power to help keep Trump in office. But the president was ultimately dissuaded from moving forward after a high-stakes meeting with those involved, the people said.
The people spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a politically sensitive matter. The move was first reported by the New York Times. Legal analysts said it amounted to a disastrous attack on the Justice Department’s independence, and perhaps something worse.
“Before the insurrectionist assault on the US Capitol, there was an attempted coup at the Justice Dept. — fomented by the President of the United States,” former Justice Department official David Laufman wrote on Twitter.
A Justice Department spokesman declined to comment, as did Rosen.
In a written statement that seemed to draw on language in the New York Times account, Clark said, “I categorically deny that I ‘devised a plan . . . to oust’ Jeff Rosen. . . . Nor did I formulate recommendations for action based on factual inaccuracies gleaned from the Internet.”
“My practice is to rely on sworn testimony to assess disputed factual claims,” Clark said. “There were no ‘maneuver.’ There was a candid discussion of options and pros and cons with the President. It is unfortunate that those who were part of a privileged legal conversation would comment in public about such internal deliberations, while also distorting any discussions. . . . Observing legal privileges, which I will adhere to even if others will not, prevent me from divulging specifics regarding the conversation.”
Asked for a response to the article, a Trump adviser said, “President Trump has consistently argued that our justice system should be investigating the broader, rampant election fraud that has plagued our system for many years. Any assertion to the contrary is false and being driven by those who wish to keep the system broken.”
Throughout his four years in office, Trump persistently pushed the Justice Department to make moves to benefit himself and his friends, though his moves in his final days in office threatened to be particularly damaging. Even former attorney general William P. Barr — who had been one of Trump’s most loyal and effective Cabinet secretaries — had publicly broken with the president on the issue of voter fraud, declaring publicly that investigators had found no evidence of substantial malfeasance that might affect the result of the election.
Undercutting Trump, Barr says there’s no basis for seizing voting machines, using special counsels for election fraud, Hunter Biden
Barr’s statements angered Trump, who, along with his allies, had been waging a public campaign to get Barr to appoint a special counsel to investigate election fraud. The men’s relationship was near a breaking point. Trump already had been angry that his attorney general had not taken public steps in two other investigations that might have helped his chances of winning: U.S. Attorney John Durham’s examination into the FBI probe of his 2016 campaign, and the Justice Department’s probe of Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son. On Dec. 14, Barr submitted a resignation letter indicating he would leave the department two days before Christmas.
For the last month of the Trump administration, Rosen would be in charge.
Barr was confident that Rosen shared his views and would thus not succumb to any pressure campaign to upend the election results, people familiar with the matter said. But soon, there emerged a bizarre plot to go around him, the people said.
Clark, the people said, somehow connected with Trump and conveyed he felt fraud had impacted the election results. Then Clark began pressuring Rosen and others to do more on voter fraud — such as holding a news conference to announce they were investigating serious allegations, or taking particular steps in Georgia — though Rosen refused. At some point, Rosen was informed Clark would replace him, and he pushed for a meeting with Trump in person, the people said. It was theoretically possible that, if Clark were installed, he could push to stop certification of the election results.
At the meeting were Trump, Clark and Rosen, along with Richard Donoghue, the acting deputy attorney general; Steven A. Engel, the head of the department’s Office of Legal Counsel; and Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, the people familiar with the matter said. The people said Rosen, Donoghue, Engel and Cipollone pushed against the idea of replacing Rosen, and warned of a mass resignation.
Cipollone, one person said, pushed hard against a letter Clark wanted to send to Georgia state legislators, which wrongly asserted the department was investigating accusations of fraud in their state and Biden’s win should be voided, insisting it was based on a shoddy claim.
“Pat pretty much saved Rosen’s job that day,” said one senior Trump White House official.
Trump ultimately left Rosen in place, and the results were certified.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...f0b9fa-5d1c-11eb-a976-bad6431e03e2_story.html
 

Billy_Kinetta

Paladin of the Lost Hour
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2013
Messages
51,000
Reaction score
19,048
Points
2,280
"people familiar with the matter said"

:auiqs.jpg:
 
OP
E

eddiew37

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
10,980
Reaction score
1,935
Points
275
"people familiar with the matter said"

:auiqs.jpg:
Billy It's the truth and I know how hard it is for republicans to accept the truth Trump is a low life crook with money and lawyers Period
 
OP
E

eddiew37

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
10,980
Reaction score
1,935
Points
275
Already an eye?? Got a little republican all worked up ?? lol
 

Harry Dresden

Adamantium Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
75,195
Reaction score
13,386
Points
2,210
Location
Nv.
eddie the guy is gone......he cant hurt you anymore.....
 

tyroneweaver

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2012
Messages
20,882
Reaction score
5,298
Points
280
Location
Burley, Idaho
they started to impeach trump before he even took office.
and now he's out and there still trying to impeach him
strange form of attachment to the point of a psychosis
 
OP
E

eddiew37

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
10,980
Reaction score
1,935
Points
275
eddie the guy is gone......he cant hurt you anymore.....
Harry So just let the pos walk away after trying to destroy our democracy? Let him run again??
He's damaged goods
Donald Trump is 'damaged goods' and Mitch McConnell wants him gone forever: report
In a deep dive for the New Yorker, journalist Jane Mayer wrote that former Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) wants to sever all ties between the Republican Party and former President Donald Trump because of the damage he has done to the party.

In interviews with associates of McConnell, they point out that McConnell has always loathed Trump but saw him as a means to end to stack the courts and advance his own agenda, but after the loss of the two Senate seats in Georgia that were held by Republicans and the storming of the U.S. Capitol, he wants Trump banished from the GOP.

As Mayer reports, "Unnamed associates revealed to reporters on Capitol Hill that McConnell was no longer speaking to Trump, and might vote to convict him if the impeachment process moved to a Senate trial," before adding that Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY) relayed, "Three years ago, I said he'd wait until Trump was an existential threat to the Party, and then cut him loose. He's been furious with Trump for a long time. Many who know him have talked with him about how much he hates Trump."

As it stands now, McConnell would like to see Trump impeached -- as well as banned from running for office again -- as long as he is not blamed for it.

"Any pretense that McConnell could maintain control over Trump or over the Party's fate unravelled after the 2020 election," Mayer wrote. "McConnell was caught between denouncing Trump's lies and alienating his supporters, thereby risking the loss of the two Senate seats in the Georgia runoff. Faced with a choice between truth and self-interest, McConnell opted for the latter."

With the loss of the seats -- costing McConnell his Majority Leader spot -- as well as the Trump-inspired attack on the Capitol that left five dead and the country horrified, McConnell has realized that the ex-president has outlived his usefulness.

"There is no going back now. He has decided to cut his losses, and do what he can to make sure Trump is no longer a threat to the Republican Party," political consultant Jim Manley suggested before adding that Republicans "have gotten as much out of Trump as they can, and it's now time to make sure Trump is damaged goods."

"If McConnell can muster the additional sixteen Republican votes necessary for a conviction—doing so requires the assent of two-thirds of the Senate, and the fifty Democratic senators are expected to vote as a bloc—he will have effectively purged Trump from the Party," Mayer wrote. "Moreover, after a conviction, the Senate could hold a second vote, to bar Trump permanently from running for any federal office. Such a move might strengthen McConnell's clout within the Party and help his wing of traditional Republicans reëstablish itself as the face of the G.O.P."

You can read more here.
 

MadChemist

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2017
Messages
1,110
Reaction score
351
Points
210
Trump entertained plan to install an attorney general who would help him pursue baseless election fraud claims
Then-President Donald Trump in early January entertained a plan to replace the acting attorney general with a different Justice Department lawyer who was more amenable to pursuing his unfounded claims of voter fraud, nearly touching off a crisis at the country’s premier federal law enforcement institution, people familiar with the matter said.

The plan — if enacted — would have pushed out Jeffrey Rosen as the acting attorney general and installed in his place Jeffrey Clark, whom Trump had appointed to lead the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division and who later would come to lead the Civil Division. Clark, then, could have taken steps to wield the Justice Department’s power to help keep Trump in office. But the president was ultimately dissuaded from moving forward after a high-stakes meeting with those involved, the people said.
The people spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a politically sensitive matter. The move was first reported by the New York Times. Legal analysts said it amounted to a disastrous attack on the Justice Department’s independence, and perhaps something worse.
“Before the insurrectionist assault on the US Capitol, there was an attempted coup at the Justice Dept. — fomented by the President of the United States,” former Justice Department official David Laufman wrote on Twitter.
A Justice Department spokesman declined to comment, as did Rosen.
In a written statement that seemed to draw on language in the New York Times account, Clark said, “I categorically deny that I ‘devised a plan . . . to oust’ Jeff Rosen. . . . Nor did I formulate recommendations for action based on factual inaccuracies gleaned from the Internet.”
“My practice is to rely on sworn testimony to assess disputed factual claims,” Clark said. “There were no ‘maneuver.’ There was a candid discussion of options and pros and cons with the President. It is unfortunate that those who were part of a privileged legal conversation would comment in public about such internal deliberations, while also distorting any discussions. . . . Observing legal privileges, which I will adhere to even if others will not, prevent me from divulging specifics regarding the conversation.”
Asked for a response to the article, a Trump adviser said, “President Trump has consistently argued that our justice system should be investigating the broader, rampant election fraud that has plagued our system for many years. Any assertion to the contrary is false and being driven by those who wish to keep the system broken.”
Throughout his four years in office, Trump persistently pushed the Justice Department to make moves to benefit himself and his friends, though his moves in his final days in office threatened to be particularly damaging. Even former attorney general William P. Barr — who had been one of Trump’s most loyal and effective Cabinet secretaries — had publicly broken with the president on the issue of voter fraud, declaring publicly that investigators had found no evidence of substantial malfeasance that might affect the result of the election.
Undercutting Trump, Barr says there’s no basis for seizing voting machines, using special counsels for election fraud, Hunter Biden
Barr’s statements angered Trump, who, along with his allies, had been waging a public campaign to get Barr to appoint a special counsel to investigate election fraud. The men’s relationship was near a breaking point. Trump already had been angry that his attorney general had not taken public steps in two other investigations that might have helped his chances of winning: U.S. Attorney John Durham’s examination into the FBI probe of his 2016 campaign, and the Justice Department’s probe of Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son. On Dec. 14, Barr submitted a resignation letter indicating he would leave the department two days before Christmas.
For the last month of the Trump administration, Rosen would be in charge.
Barr was confident that Rosen shared his views and would thus not succumb to any pressure campaign to upend the election results, people familiar with the matter said. But soon, there emerged a bizarre plot to go around him, the people said.
Clark, the people said, somehow connected with Trump and conveyed he felt fraud had impacted the election results. Then Clark began pressuring Rosen and others to do more on voter fraud — such as holding a news conference to announce they were investigating serious allegations, or taking particular steps in Georgia — though Rosen refused. At some point, Rosen was informed Clark would replace him, and he pushed for a meeting with Trump in person, the people said. It was theoretically possible that, if Clark were installed, he could push to stop certification of the election results.
At the meeting were Trump, Clark and Rosen, along with Richard Donoghue, the acting deputy attorney general; Steven A. Engel, the head of the department’s Office of Legal Counsel; and Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, the people familiar with the matter said. The people said Rosen, Donoghue, Engel and Cipollone pushed against the idea of replacing Rosen, and warned of a mass resignation.
Cipollone, one person said, pushed hard against a letter Clark wanted to send to Georgia state legislators, which wrongly asserted the department was investigating accusations of fraud in their state and Biden’s win should be voided, insisting it was based on a shoddy claim.
“Pat pretty much saved Rosen’s job that day,” said one senior Trump White House official.
Trump ultimately left Rosen in place, and the results were certified.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...f0b9fa-5d1c-11eb-a976-bad6431e03e2_story.html
1611427658247.png
 

Turtlesoup

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
5,384
Reaction score
6,387
Points
1,918
Trump entertained plan to install an attorney general who would help him pursue baseless election fraud claims
Then-President Donald Trump in early January entertained a plan to replace the acting attorney general with a different Justice Department lawyer who was more amenable to pursuing his unfounded claims of voter fraud, nearly touching off a crisis at the country’s premier federal law enforcement institution, people familiar with the matter said.

The plan — if enacted — would have pushed out Jeffrey Rosen as the acting attorney general and installed in his place Jeffrey Clark, whom Trump had appointed to lead the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division and who later would come to lead the Civil Division. Clark, then, could have taken steps to wield the Justice Department’s power to help keep Trump in office. But the president was ultimately dissuaded from moving forward after a high-stakes meeting with those involved, the people said.
The people spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a politically sensitive matter. The move was first reported by the New York Times. Legal analysts said it amounted to a disastrous attack on the Justice Department’s independence, and perhaps something worse.
“Before the insurrectionist assault on the US Capitol, there was an attempted coup at the Justice Dept. — fomented by the President of the United States,” former Justice Department official David Laufman wrote on Twitter.
A Justice Department spokesman declined to comment, as did Rosen.
In a written statement that seemed to draw on language in the New York Times account, Clark said, “I categorically deny that I ‘devised a plan . . . to oust’ Jeff Rosen. . . . Nor did I formulate recommendations for action based on factual inaccuracies gleaned from the Internet.”
“My practice is to rely on sworn testimony to assess disputed factual claims,” Clark said. “There were no ‘maneuver.’ There was a candid discussion of options and pros and cons with the President. It is unfortunate that those who were part of a privileged legal conversation would comment in public about such internal deliberations, while also distorting any discussions. . . . Observing legal privileges, which I will adhere to even if others will not, prevent me from divulging specifics regarding the conversation.”
Asked for a response to the article, a Trump adviser said, “President Trump has consistently argued that our justice system should be investigating the broader, rampant election fraud that has plagued our system for many years. Any assertion to the contrary is false and being driven by those who wish to keep the system broken.”
Throughout his four years in office, Trump persistently pushed the Justice Department to make moves to benefit himself and his friends, though his moves in his final days in office threatened to be particularly damaging. Even former attorney general William P. Barr — who had been one of Trump’s most loyal and effective Cabinet secretaries — had publicly broken with the president on the issue of voter fraud, declaring publicly that investigators had found no evidence of substantial malfeasance that might affect the result of the election.
Undercutting Trump, Barr says there’s no basis for seizing voting machines, using special counsels for election fraud, Hunter Biden
Barr’s statements angered Trump, who, along with his allies, had been waging a public campaign to get Barr to appoint a special counsel to investigate election fraud. The men’s relationship was near a breaking point. Trump already had been angry that his attorney general had not taken public steps in two other investigations that might have helped his chances of winning: U.S. Attorney John Durham’s examination into the FBI probe of his 2016 campaign, and the Justice Department’s probe of Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son. On Dec. 14, Barr submitted a resignation letter indicating he would leave the department two days before Christmas.
For the last month of the Trump administration, Rosen would be in charge.
Barr was confident that Rosen shared his views and would thus not succumb to any pressure campaign to upend the election results, people familiar with the matter said. But soon, there emerged a bizarre plot to go around him, the people said.
Clark, the people said, somehow connected with Trump and conveyed he felt fraud had impacted the election results. Then Clark began pressuring Rosen and others to do more on voter fraud — such as holding a news conference to announce they were investigating serious allegations, or taking particular steps in Georgia — though Rosen refused. At some point, Rosen was informed Clark would replace him, and he pushed for a meeting with Trump in person, the people said. It was theoretically possible that, if Clark were installed, he could push to stop certification of the election results.
At the meeting were Trump, Clark and Rosen, along with Richard Donoghue, the acting deputy attorney general; Steven A. Engel, the head of the department’s Office of Legal Counsel; and Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, the people familiar with the matter said. The people said Rosen, Donoghue, Engel and Cipollone pushed against the idea of replacing Rosen, and warned of a mass resignation.
Cipollone, one person said, pushed hard against a letter Clark wanted to send to Georgia state legislators, which wrongly asserted the department was investigating accusations of fraud in their state and Biden’s win should be voided, insisting it was based on a shoddy claim.
“Pat pretty much saved Rosen’s job that day,” said one senior Trump White House official.
Trump ultimately left Rosen in place, and the results were certified.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...f0b9fa-5d1c-11eb-a976-bad6431e03e2_story.html
BASELESS? Dont think so..........

The claims seem pretty legit to me-------machines that flip votes in a nano second have been snagged.
 

Harry Dresden

Adamantium Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
75,195
Reaction score
13,386
Points
2,210
Location
Nv.
eddie the guy is gone......he cant hurt you anymore.....
Harry So just let the pos walk away after trying to destroy our democracy? Let him run again??
He's damaged goods
Donald Trump is 'damaged goods' and Mitch McConnell wants him gone forever: report
In a deep dive for the New Yorker, journalist Jane Mayer wrote that former Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) wants to sever all ties between the Republican Party and former President Donald Trump because of the damage he has done to the party.

In interviews with associates of McConnell, they point out that McConnell has always loathed Trump but saw him as a means to end to stack the courts and advance his own agenda, but after the loss of the two Senate seats in Georgia that were held by Republicans and the storming of the U.S. Capitol, he wants Trump banished from the GOP.

As Mayer reports, "Unnamed associates revealed to reporters on Capitol Hill that McConnell was no longer speaking to Trump, and might vote to convict him if the impeachment process moved to a Senate trial," before adding that Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY) relayed, "Three years ago, I said he'd wait until Trump was an existential threat to the Party, and then cut him loose. He's been furious with Trump for a long time. Many who know him have talked with him about how much he hates Trump."

As it stands now, McConnell would like to see Trump impeached -- as well as banned from running for office again -- as long as he is not blamed for it.

"Any pretense that McConnell could maintain control over Trump or over the Party's fate unravelled after the 2020 election," Mayer wrote. "McConnell was caught between denouncing Trump's lies and alienating his supporters, thereby risking the loss of the two Senate seats in the Georgia runoff. Faced with a choice between truth and self-interest, McConnell opted for the latter."

With the loss of the seats -- costing McConnell his Majority Leader spot -- as well as the Trump-inspired attack on the Capitol that left five dead and the country horrified, McConnell has realized that the ex-president has outlived his usefulness.

"There is no going back now. He has decided to cut his losses, and do what he can to make sure Trump is no longer a threat to the Republican Party," political consultant Jim Manley suggested before adding that Republicans "have gotten as much out of Trump as they can, and it's now time to make sure Trump is damaged goods."

"If McConnell can muster the additional sixteen Republican votes necessary for a conviction—doing so requires the assent of two-thirds of the Senate, and the fifty Democratic senators are expected to vote as a bloc—he will have effectively purged Trump from the Party," Mayer wrote. "Moreover, after a conviction, the Senate could hold a second vote, to bar Trump permanently from running for any federal office. Such a move might strengthen McConnell's clout within the Party and help his wing of traditional Republicans reëstablish itself as the face of the G.O.P."

You can read more here.
eddie lots of people felt obama and bush was trying to destroy the country too....i feel that that our wonderful congress has been trying to do that for the last 20 years...
 

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top