Possible Death of Colonel Gaddafi

LAfrique

VIP Member
Joined
May 16, 2011
Messages
1,416
Reaction score
69
Points
83
Sources say African leader and International Freedom Fighter, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi, was captured and possibly killed in a gun battle in Sirte. The Colonel all along was in his homeland, just as he told the world months earlier he would be. I guess this would mean another boost for Barack Obama (descendent of an African man) who is being used by world imperialist gang, as if they are of the assumption that using the offspring of a man of a developing nation against people of developing nations somehow justify their imperialistic and barbaric acts.

Sadness notwithstanding, I cannot help but rejoice at the heroic fight the Colonel put up, for months, against Western imperialists who came against the Colonel as though they went against the Star Fleet Enterprise. But again, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a force to contend with:

For forty-two (42) years, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi of oil-rich Libya managed to keep Western imperialists noted for plundering the resources of developing nations at bay. The long-sought retirement of Colonel Gaddafi took its peak in March, 2011, when a revolution spurred by the sacrifice of a 27-year-old Tunisian in Tunisia inspired Libyan rebels. The conquest would take another turn when Western imperialists who have always seen Colonel Gaddafi as a force to contend with and hated Colonel Gaddafi even more for informing them months earlier he would repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa, seized the opportunity of the civil unrest in Libya and joined Libyan rebels in their struggle to oust Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

While Colonel Muammar Gaddafi may have been a national tyrant (and the result of African tradition), the Colonel was however not a dictator: The uninformed simply mistook African tyranny for dictatorship. And though flamboyant and opinionated, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a perceptive African leader:

For years, the Colonel managed the affairs of his nation, while refusing to bow to the whims of neo-colonialists. Any African leader who could keep at bay Western imperialists with history of plunder in Africa and disdain for prosperity and independence of Africa is a superb leader! Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was an International FREEDOM FIGHTER!

Contrary to popular belief, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi kept Libya away from the reins of noted world imperialists and kept the Central Bank of Libya independent from the IMF, World bank and their affiliates.

Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi fought a heroic fight and finished his race. The Colonel will forever be in my book as a Great and Perceptive African Leader and International Freedom Fighter.
 
Last edited:

waltky

Wise ol' monkey
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
26,211
Reaction score
2,581
Points
275
Location
Okolona, KY
Uncle Ferd wantin' to know if dat Generalissimo Francisco Franco still dead?...
:tongue:
Gadhafi killed, Libya's interim leader says
Thu October 20, 2011 - Gadhafi's son, Mutassim, and his chief of intelligence, Abdullah al-Senussi, were also killed; Al-Jazeera airs a cell phone video apparently of Moammar Gadhafi's corpse; Reports of Gadhafi's capture, death could not be independently verified; Earlier, National Transitional Council fighters said they had taken control of Sirte
Longtime Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi has been killed, interim Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril said Thursday. The confirmation came after hours of conflicting reports about the former leader's status. Gadhafi's son, Mutassim, and his chief of intelligence, Abdullah al-Senussi, were also killed, according to Anees al-Sharif, a spokesman for the Tripoli military council. Revolutionary fighters attacked the house where Gadhafi was hiding, Information Minister Mahmoud Shammam told CNN. Gadhafi was shot while trying to flee, he said. "Colonel Gadhafi is history," he said. A grisly cell phone video aired on Al-Jazeera Arabic showed a bloodied Gadhafi with a wound to his head. A cell phone photograph distributed by the news agency Agence France Presse also appeared to show Gadhafi severely wounded. CNN could not independently verify the authenticity of the images.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who visited Tripoli this week, could not confirm Gadhafi's capture or killing but said it would "add legitimacy and relief to the formation of a new government." Abubaker Saad, who served as a Gadhafi aide for nine years, said it didn't really matter whether Gadhafi was dead or alive -- as long as he was no longer a fugitive. "As long as he was on the run he represented a very ominous danger to the Libyan people," Saad told CNN. "He represented a very ominous danger ... to the idea of the democracy in Libya." Saad said he never saw Gadhafi sleep in the same place two nights in a row. "This man has been doing it for 42 years. He has experience in hiding," Saad said. "So, I am thrilled to see the Libyan fighters in Sirte (were) able to kill him or capture him." In another major development, revolutionary fighters said they wrested control of Sirte Thursday. And NATO said it is going to convene soon for a meeting to discuss ending its operation in Libya, a source told CNN.

Earlier, NATO aircraft struck two pro-Gadhafi military vehicles in the Sirte vicinity. Libyans, who have been waiting for months for Gadhafi's demise, erupted in deafening celebrations. Horns blared and celebratory gunfire burst into the air in Tripoli. Gadhafi ruled Libya with an iron fist for 42 years. The mercurial leader came to power in a bloodless coup against King Idris in 1969, when he was just an army captain. By the end of his rule, he claimed to be "King of Kings," a title he had a gathering of tribal leaders grant him in 2008. But a February uprising evolved into civil war that resulted in ousting the strongman from power.

Earlier, anti-Gadhafi fighters said they had taken control of the last holdout of loyalists in Sirte. They said they were still battling pockets of resistance, but they were in control of District 2. Sirte has been the big prize for Libya's NTC, waiting for the city to fall to officially declare liberation. Most residents abandoned Sirte in the many weeks of bloody battles that raged there. Revolutionary forces have fought Gadhafi's men street by street, cornering the last vestiges of the old regime to that last district. Gadhafi, wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, for alleged crimes against humanity, had not been seen in public in months.

Libyans rejoice at Gadhafi's death - CNN.com
 

JWBooth

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
10,341
Reaction score
2,478
Points
255
Location
Texas Republic
Sources say African leader and International Freedom Fighter, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi, was captured and possibly killed in a gun battle in Sirte. The Colonel all along was in his homeland, just as he told the world months earlier he would be. I guess this would mean another boost for Barack Obama (descendent of an African man) who is being used by world imperialist gang, as if they are of the assumption that using the offspring of a man of a developing nation against people of developing nations somehow justify their imperialistic and barbaric acts.

While there is no concrete evidence of the death of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, I cannot help but rejoice at the heroic fight the Colonel put up, for months, against Western imperialists who came against the Colonel as though they went against the Star Fleet Enterprise. But again, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a force to contend with:

For forty-two (42) years, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi of oil-rich Libya managed to keep Western imperialists noted for plundering the resources of developing nations at bay. The long-sought retirement of Colonel Gaddafi took its peak in March, 2011, when a revolution spurred by the sacrifice of a 27-year-old Tunisian in Tunisia inspired Libyan rebels. The conquest would take another turn when Western imperialists who have always seen Colonel Gaddafi as a force to contend with and hated Colonel Gaddafi even more for informing them months earlier he would repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa, seized the opportunity of the civil unrest in Libya and joined Libyan rebels in their struggle to oust Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

While Colonel Muammar Gaddafi may have been a national tyrant (and the result of African tradition), the Colonel was however not a dictator: The uninformed simply mistook African tyranny for dictatorship. And though flamboyant and opinionated, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a perceptive African leader:

Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was nonetheless an International FREEDOM FIGHTER! Any African leader who could keep away Western imperialists with history of plunder in Africa and disdain for prosperity and independence of Africa is a superb leader!

Contrary to popular belief, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi kept Libya away from the reins of noted world imperialists and kept the Central Bank of Libya independent from the IMF, World bank and their affiliates.

Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi fought a heroic fight and finished his race. Colonel Muammar Gaddafi will forever be in my book as a Great and Perceptive African Leader and International Freedom Fighter.

Possible? The silly fucker is deader than Studebaker.
 

High_Gravity

Belligerent Drunk
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
40,159
Reaction score
7,084
Points
260
Location
Richmond VA
Sources say African leader and International Freedom Fighter, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi, was captured and possibly killed in a gun battle in Sirte. The Colonel all along was in his homeland, just as he told the world months earlier he would be. I guess this would mean another boost for Barack Obama (descendent of an African man) who is being used by world imperialist gang, as if they are of the assumption that using the offspring of a man of a developing nation against people of developing nations somehow justify their imperialistic and barbaric acts.

While there is no concrete evidence of the death of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, I cannot help but rejoice at the heroic fight the Colonel put up, for months, against Western imperialists who came against the Colonel as though they went against the Star Fleet Enterprise. But again, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a force to contend with:

For forty-two (42) years, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi of oil-rich Libya managed to keep Western imperialists noted for plundering the resources of developing nations at bay. The long-sought retirement of Colonel Gaddafi took its peak in March, 2011, when a revolution spurred by the sacrifice of a 27-year-old Tunisian in Tunisia inspired Libyan rebels. The conquest would take another turn when Western imperialists who have always seen Colonel Gaddafi as a force to contend with and hated Colonel Gaddafi even more for informing them months earlier he would repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa, seized the opportunity of the civil unrest in Libya and joined Libyan rebels in their struggle to oust Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

While Colonel Muammar Gaddafi may have been a national tyrant (and the result of African tradition), the Colonel was however not a dictator: The uninformed simply mistook African tyranny for dictatorship. And though flamboyant and opinionated, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a perceptive African leader:

Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was nonetheless an International FREEDOM FIGHTER! Any African leader who could keep away Western imperialists with history of plunder in Africa and disdain for prosperity and independence of Africa is a superb leader!

Contrary to popular belief, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi kept Libya away from the reins of noted world imperialists and kept the Central Bank of Libya independent from the IMF, World bank and their affiliates.

Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi fought a heroic fight and finished his race. Colonel Muammar Gaddafi will forever be in my book as a Great and Perceptive African Leader and International Freedom Fighter.

Possible? The silly fucker is deader than Studebaker.
He is playing checkers with Saddam in hell.
 
OP
L

LAfrique

VIP Member
Joined
May 16, 2011
Messages
1,416
Reaction score
69
Points
83
Uncle Ferd wantin' to know if dat Generalissimo Francisco Franco still dead?...
:tongue:
Gadhafi killed, Libya's interim leader says
Thu October 20, 2011 - Gadhafi's son, Mutassim, and his chief of intelligence, Abdullah al-Senussi, were also killed; Al-Jazeera airs a cell phone video apparently of Moammar Gadhafi's corpse; Reports of Gadhafi's capture, death could not be independently verified; Earlier, National Transitional Council fighters said they had taken control of Sirte
Longtime Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi has been killed, interim Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril said Thursday. The confirmation came after hours of conflicting reports about the former leader's status. Gadhafi's son, Mutassim, and his chief of intelligence, Abdullah al-Senussi, were also killed, according to Anees al-Sharif, a spokesman for the Tripoli military council. Revolutionary fighters attacked the house where Gadhafi was hiding, Information Minister Mahmoud Shammam told CNN. Gadhafi was shot while trying to flee, he said. "Colonel Gadhafi is history," he said. A grisly cell phone video aired on Al-Jazeera Arabic showed a bloodied Gadhafi with a wound to his head. A cell phone photograph distributed by the news agency Agence France Presse also appeared to show Gadhafi severely wounded. CNN could not independently verify the authenticity of the images.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who visited Tripoli this week, could not confirm Gadhafi's capture or killing but said it would "add legitimacy and relief to the formation of a new government." Abubaker Saad, who served as a Gadhafi aide for nine years, said it didn't really matter whether Gadhafi was dead or alive -- as long as he was no longer a fugitive. "As long as he was on the run he represented a very ominous danger to the Libyan people," Saad told CNN. "He represented a very ominous danger ... to the idea of the democracy in Libya." Saad said he never saw Gadhafi sleep in the same place two nights in a row. "This man has been doing it for 42 years. He has experience in hiding," Saad said. "So, I am thrilled to see the Libyan fighters in Sirte (were) able to kill him or capture him." In another major development, revolutionary fighters said they wrested control of Sirte Thursday. And NATO said it is going to convene soon for a meeting to discuss ending its operation in Libya, a source told CNN.

Earlier, NATO aircraft struck two pro-Gadhafi military vehicles in the Sirte vicinity. Libyans, who have been waiting for months for Gadhafi's demise, erupted in deafening celebrations. Horns blared and celebratory gunfire burst into the air in Tripoli. Gadhafi ruled Libya with an iron fist for 42 years. The mercurial leader came to power in a bloodless coup against King Idris in 1969, when he was just an army captain. By the end of his rule, he claimed to be "King of Kings," a title he had a gathering of tribal leaders grant him in 2008. But a February uprising evolved into civil war that resulted in ousting the strongman from power.

Earlier, anti-Gadhafi fighters said they had taken control of the last holdout of loyalists in Sirte. They said they were still battling pockets of resistance, but they were in control of District 2. Sirte has been the big prize for Libya's NTC, waiting for the city to fall to officially declare liberation. Most residents abandoned Sirte in the many weeks of bloody battles that raged there. Revolutionary forces have fought Gadhafi's men street by street, cornering the last vestiges of the old regime to that last district. Gadhafi, wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, for alleged crimes against humanity, had not been seen in public in months.

Libyans rejoice at Gadhafi's death - CNN.com


Thank you, Waltky! This thread was posted before the possible death of Colonel Gaddafi was confirmed or even talked about by major news sources.
 
OP
L

LAfrique

VIP Member
Joined
May 16, 2011
Messages
1,416
Reaction score
69
Points
83
Sources say African leader and International Freedom Fighter, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi, was captured and possibly killed in a gun battle in Sirte. The Colonel all along was in his homeland, just as he told the world months earlier he would be. I guess this would mean another boost for Barack Obama (descendent of an African man) who is being used by world imperialist gang, as if they are of the assumption that using the offspring of a man of a developing nation against people of developing nations somehow justify their imperialistic and barbaric acts.

Sadness notwithstanding, I cannot help but rejoice at the heroic fight the Colonel put up, for months, against Western imperialists who came against the Colonel as though they went against the Star Fleet Enterprise. But again, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a force to contend with:

For forty-two (42) years, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi of oil-rich Libya managed to keep Western imperialists noted for plundering the resources of developing nations at bay. The long-sought retirement of Colonel Gaddafi took its peak in March, 2011, when a revolution spurred by the sacrifice of a 27-year-old Tunisian in Tunisia inspired Libyan rebels. The conquest would take another turn when Western imperialists who have always seen Colonel Gaddafi as a force to contend with and hated Colonel Gaddafi even more for informing them months earlier he would repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa, seized the opportunity of the civil unrest in Libya and joined Libyan rebels in their struggle to oust Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

While Colonel Muammar Gaddafi may have been a national tyrant (and the result of African tradition), the Colonel was however not a dictator: The uninformed simply mistook African tyranny for dictatorship. And though flamboyant and opinionated, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was a perceptive African leader:

For years, the Colonel managed the affairs of his nation, while refusing to bow to the whims of neo-colonialists. Any African leader who could keep at bay Western imperialists with history of plunder in Africa and disdain for prosperity and independence of Africa is a superb leader! Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was an International FREEDOM FIGHTER!

Contrary to popular belief, Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi kept Libya away from the reins of noted world imperialists and kept the Central Bank of Libya independent from the IMF, World bank and their affiliates.

Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar Al-Gaddafi fought a heroic fight and finished his race. The Colonel will forever be in my book as a Great and Perceptive African Leader and International Freedom Fighter.

Possible? The silly fucker is deader than Studebaker.

JWBooth, I am aware of all the propaganda about Colonel Muammar Gaddafi in Western nations. While I may not have agreed with some of the Colonel's views, facts remain that:

1). Colonel Gaddafi was attacked by the NATO Gatlin boys because he told them that he would campaign in Africa to repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa;

2). The fierce fighting in Libya in 2011 would never have occurred had UN and NATO - our neighborhood bullies - not "intervened" in Libya;

3). Colonel Muammar Gaddafi would not kiss behinds of Western imperialists; and

4). The Colonel managed to keep the Central Bank of Libya independent of the IMF and its allies, thus keeping Libya and developing nations allying with Libya independent.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 8, 2009
Messages
50,337
Reaction score
10,053
Points
0
Uncle Ferd wantin' to know if dat Generalissimo Francisco Franco still dead?...
:tongue:
Gadhafi killed, Libya's interim leader says
Thu October 20, 2011 - Gadhafi's son, Mutassim, and his chief of intelligence, Abdullah al-Senussi, were also killed; Al-Jazeera airs a cell phone video apparently of Moammar Gadhafi's corpse; Reports of Gadhafi's capture, death could not be independently verified; Earlier, National Transitional Council fighters said they had taken control of Sirte
Longtime Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi has been killed, interim Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril said Thursday. The confirmation came after hours of conflicting reports about the former leader's status. Gadhafi's son, Mutassim, and his chief of intelligence, Abdullah al-Senussi, were also killed, according to Anees al-Sharif, a spokesman for the Tripoli military council. Revolutionary fighters attacked the house where Gadhafi was hiding, Information Minister Mahmoud Shammam told CNN. Gadhafi was shot while trying to flee, he said. "Colonel Gadhafi is history," he said. A grisly cell phone video aired on Al-Jazeera Arabic showed a bloodied Gadhafi with a wound to his head. A cell phone photograph distributed by the news agency Agence France Presse also appeared to show Gadhafi severely wounded. CNN could not independently verify the authenticity of the images.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who visited Tripoli this week, could not confirm Gadhafi's capture or killing but said it would "add legitimacy and relief to the formation of a new government." Abubaker Saad, who served as a Gadhafi aide for nine years, said it didn't really matter whether Gadhafi was dead or alive -- as long as he was no longer a fugitive. "As long as he was on the run he represented a very ominous danger to the Libyan people," Saad told CNN. "He represented a very ominous danger ... to the idea of the democracy in Libya." Saad said he never saw Gadhafi sleep in the same place two nights in a row. "This man has been doing it for 42 years. He has experience in hiding," Saad said. "So, I am thrilled to see the Libyan fighters in Sirte (were) able to kill him or capture him." In another major development, revolutionary fighters said they wrested control of Sirte Thursday. And NATO said it is going to convene soon for a meeting to discuss ending its operation in Libya, a source told CNN.

Earlier, NATO aircraft struck two pro-Gadhafi military vehicles in the Sirte vicinity. Libyans, who have been waiting for months for Gadhafi's demise, erupted in deafening celebrations. Horns blared and celebratory gunfire burst into the air in Tripoli. Gadhafi ruled Libya with an iron fist for 42 years. The mercurial leader came to power in a bloodless coup against King Idris in 1969, when he was just an army captain. By the end of his rule, he claimed to be "King of Kings," a title he had a gathering of tribal leaders grant him in 2008. But a February uprising evolved into civil war that resulted in ousting the strongman from power.

Earlier, anti-Gadhafi fighters said they had taken control of the last holdout of loyalists in Sirte. They said they were still battling pockets of resistance, but they were in control of District 2. Sirte has been the big prize for Libya's NTC, waiting for the city to fall to officially declare liberation. Most residents abandoned Sirte in the many weeks of bloody battles that raged there. Revolutionary forces have fought Gadhafi's men street by street, cornering the last vestiges of the old regime to that last district. Gadhafi, wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, for alleged crimes against humanity, had not been seen in public in months.

Libyans rejoice at Gadhafi's death - CNN.com


Thank you, Waltky! This thread was posted before the possible death of Colonel Gaddafi was confirmed or even talked about by major news sources.
It was posted after we'd already had 4 threads about it.

Twit.
 

JWBooth

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
10,341
Reaction score
2,478
Points
255
Location
Texas Republic
Possible? The silly fucker is deader than Studebaker.

JWBooth, I am aware of all the propaganda about Colonel Muammar Gaddafi in Western nations. While I may not have agreed with some of the Colonel's views, facts remain that:

1). Colonel Gaddafi was attacked by the NATO Gatlin boys because he told them that he would campaign in Africa to repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa;

2). The fierce fighting in Libya in 2011 would never have occurred had UN and NATO - our neighborhood bullies - not "intervened" in Libya;

3). Colonel Muammar Gaddafi would not kiss behinds of Western imperialists; and

4). The Colonel managed to keep the Central Bank of Libya independent of the IMF and its allies, thus keeping Libya and developing nations allying with Libya independent.
I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that every thing in your four points is absolutely true.

Studebaker was a US company that made cars that were better than much of their competition. They went belly up in the early 1960's, but there are a few of the old cars still chugging along.
At the time I posted...the Colonel had already gone to meet with whatever Deity we all end up answering to, hence his being deader than Studebaker.
 
OP
L

LAfrique

VIP Member
Joined
May 16, 2011
Messages
1,416
Reaction score
69
Points
83
Possible? The silly fucker is deader than Studebaker.

JWBooth, I am aware of all the propaganda about Colonel Muammar Gaddafi in Western nations. While I may not have agreed with some of the Colonel's views, facts remain that:

1). Colonel Gaddafi was attacked by the NATO Gatlin boys because he told them that he would campaign in Africa to repudiate both the dollar and the euro as trading currencies in Africa;

2). The fierce fighting in Libya in 2011 would never have occurred had UN and NATO - our neighborhood bullies - not "intervened" in Libya;

3). Colonel Muammar Gaddafi would not kiss behinds of Western imperialists; and

4). The Colonel managed to keep the Central Bank of Libya independent of the IMF and its allies, thus keeping Libya and developing nations allying with Libya independent.
I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that every thing in your four points is absolutely true.

Studebaker was a US company that made cars that were better than much of their competition. They went belly up in the early 1960's, but there are a few of the old cars still chugging along.
At the time I posted...the Colonel had already gone to meet with whatever Deity we all end up answering to, hence his being deader than Studebaker.


Thank you, again! And as you can see from content of my original post, this thread was a fore-tribute to Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.
 

waltky

Wise ol' monkey
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
26,211
Reaction score
2,581
Points
275
Location
Okolona, KY
Libya got a monumental task ahead of `em bringing all the disparate tribes together while trying to keep al-Qaida and other extremist groups from co-opting the revolution...
:eusa_eh:
ANALYSIS: Libya free to move on, but in which direction?
Sat, Oct 22, 2011 - Muammar Qaddafi, who dominated Libya with merciless single--mindedness for 42 years, was a liar, a murderer and a cheat, but in one respect, at least, he stayed true to his word. When the Libyan uprising began in February and led swiftly to NATO’s military intervention, Qaddafi vowed to fight to the death.
He would not give himself up to his pursuers like former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, Qaddafi declared in radio addresses, nor would he flee, like Tunisia’s ousted president, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, the first “victim” of the Arab Spring. There would be no surrender, no private jet into pampered exile. On Thursday, amid the ruins of his home town of Sirte, the insurgent fighters of the National Transitional Council (NTC), backed by NATO bombers, took him at his word. Qaddafi had pledged a last stand, so he stood and fought. And he was, it transpired as the smoke cleared, no invincible behemoth, but ordinary flesh and blood after all. He died painfully, beaten with a pistol according to some reports, then shot at close range. But die he did.

No longer feared or fearsome, no longer the brash, bragging villain, no more the showman-turned-monster — just another slain tyrant hitting the dust with a thud. And after the waiting, killing and tears, the wheel of history turned inexorably, and all who watched knew it would never turn back. The Arab Spring had claimed another infamous scalp. The risky Western intervention had worked and Libya was liberated at last. Jubilation across Libya will be matched by relief among Western governments. Now they will congratulate themselves that Libya has been “saved for the West” and may be molded to Western political and free-market paradigms. Their confidence may be misplaced.

“We hope he can be captured or killed soon so that you don’t have to fear him any more,” US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said on Tuesday. “The most important thing now is to make sure that Qaddafi and his regime are finally prevented from disrupting the new Libya.” US State officials quickly explained that Clinton’s words did not mean that US policy had switched in favor of deliberately eliminating Qaddafi. Washington wanted him brought to justice, they said.

However, there is no disguising the fact that, for governments including those in London and Washington, Qaddafi’s sudden, final departure must be vastly preferable to the prospect of a prolonged desert guerrilla war, costly NATO engagement, continuing instability affecting Libya and neighboring states, a lengthy, high-profile trial, wrangling over the jurisdiction of the international criminal court or any of the other possible scenarios that might have played out should he have lived on. However, the larger point of interest for Libyans and a watching Arab world — driven home by videos and photographs apparently showing Qaddafi’s bloodied body — is that the dictator is dead and that Libyans are finally free to move on. What direction they will go is the next big question. The answer will not be quick in coming, in no small part because of Qaddafi’s poisonous legacy.

MORE
See also:

Qaddafi's death leaves a Libya that must build itself from scratch
October 20, 2011 - Muammar Qaddafi's government was one of a kind, with no independent institutions. That means Libya's new government has nothing, good or bad, to build on.
The killing of Muammar Qaddafi today puts an exclamation point on the Libyan revolution. Difficult challenges remain ahead for Libya. But with Qaddafi gone, his strange, formless, socialist-in-name-but-tyrannical-in-application form of government is gone as well. The writing has been on the wall for months, at least since Tripoli fell to rebel forces. Since then, there's been plenty of writing on his legacy and impact on the world. Long time Monitor Africa correspondent Scott Baldauf wrote in August that Qaddafi has had a profound impact on his continent.

"As the single-largest contributor to the budget of the African Union, a prime aid donor for poor African countries, and a dependable advocate for pan-African cooperation, Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi is a man whose impact reaches far beyond his country’s borders. That impact is sometimes good, as when he funds hospital or road projects, or when his estimated 15 percent contribution of the AU’s budget allows the AU to send peacekeepers to Somalia, Darfur, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. And it can be bad, when he buys weapons for rebel groups to destabilize his neighbors like Sudan and Chad." Writing for Brooking's soon after the uprising against Qaddafi began in February, Daniel Byman argued that sui generis nature of Qaddafi's Libya made looking to other countries for hints of Libya's future without him especially difficult.

"In any country, new regimes build on the institutions of old ones even as they create their own. For Tunisia and Egypt (and maybe for Bahrain, Yemen, and other countries being hit by the wave of unrest that is sweeping the Arab world), the new governments must contend with armies, judicial systems, and even political parties that began their life under the old order. But in Libya, these institutions are difficult to understand and their possible legacies even more difficult to anticipate. One of the (many) peculiarities of the Leader, as the Libyan dictator styled himself, is that he established a political system as bizarre as he is," he wrote. "Should Qaddafi go, Libya’s political structure must be rebuilt from scratch. It is not just a case of putting in a new regime, but instead of creating a new system from top to bottom. However, civil wars, as Libya is now in, are not known for creating an environment for that sort of restructuring."

MORE
 
OP
L

LAfrique

VIP Member
Joined
May 16, 2011
Messages
1,416
Reaction score
69
Points
83
Libya got a monumental task ahead of `em bringing all the disparate tribes together while trying to keep al-Qaeda and other extremist groups from co-opting the revolution...
:eusa_eh:
ANALYSIS: Libya free to move on, but in which direction?
Sat, Oct 22, 2011 - Muammar Qaddafi, who dominated Libya with merciless single--mindedness for 42 years, was a liar, a murderer and a cheat, but in one respect, at least, he stayed true to his word. When the Libyan uprising began in February and led swiftly to NATO’s military intervention, Qaddafi vowed to fight to the death.
He would not give himself up to his pursuers like former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, Qaddafi declared in radio addresses, nor would he flee, like Tunisia’s ousted president, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, the first “victim” of the Arab Spring. There would be no surrender, no private jet into pampered exile. On Thursday, amid the ruins of his home town of Sirte, the insurgent fighters of the National Transitional Council (NTC), backed by NATO bombers, took him at his word. Qaddafi had pledged a last stand, so he stood and fought. And he was, it transpired as the smoke cleared, no invincible behemoth, but ordinary flesh and blood after all. He died painfully, beaten with a pistol according to some reports, then shot at close range. But die he did.

No longer feared or fearsome, no longer the brash, bragging villain, no more the showman-turned-monster — just another slain tyrant hitting the dust with a thud. And after the waiting, killing and tears, the wheel of history turned inexorably, and all who watched knew it would never turn back. The Arab Spring had claimed another infamous scalp. The risky Western intervention had worked and Libya was liberated at last. Jubilation across Libya will be matched by relief among Western governments. Now they will congratulate themselves that Libya has been “saved for the West” and may be molded to Western political and free-market paradigms. Their confidence may be misplaced.

“We hope he can be captured or killed soon so that you don’t have to fear him any more,” US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said on Tuesday. “The most important thing now is to make sure that Qaddafi and his regime are finally prevented from disrupting the new Libya.” US State officials quickly explained that Clinton’s words did not mean that US policy had switched in favor of deliberately eliminating Qaddafi. Washington wanted him brought to justice, they said.

However, there is no disguising the fact that, for governments including those in London and Washington, Qaddafi’s sudden, final departure must be vastly preferable to the prospect of a prolonged desert guerrilla war, costly NATO engagement, continuing instability affecting Libya and neighboring states, a lengthy, high-profile trial, wrangling over the jurisdiction of the international criminal court or any of the other possible scenarios that might have played out should he have lived on. However, the larger point of interest for Libyans and a watching Arab world — driven home by videos and photographs apparently showing Qaddafi’s bloodied body — is that the dictator is dead and that Libyans are finally free to move on. What direction they will go is the next big question. The answer will not be quick in coming, in no small part because of Qaddafi’s poisonous legacy.

MORE
See also:

Qaddafi's death leaves a Libya that must build itself from scratch
October 20, 2011 - Muammar Qaddafi's government was one of a kind, with no independent institutions. That means Libya's new government has nothing, good or bad, to build on.
The killing of Muammar Qaddafi today puts an exclamation point on the Libyan revolution. Difficult challenges remain ahead for Libya. But with Qaddafi gone, his strange, formless, socialist-in-name-but-tyrannical-in-application form of government is gone as well. The writing has been on the wall for months, at least since Tripoli fell to rebel forces. Since then, there's been plenty of writing on his legacy and impact on the world. Long time Monitor Africa correspondent Scott Baldauf wrote in August that Qaddafi has had a profound impact on his continent.

"As the single-largest contributor to the budget of the African Union, a prime aid donor for poor African countries, and a dependable advocate for pan-African cooperation, Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi is a man whose impact reaches far beyond his country’s borders. That impact is sometimes good, as when he funds hospital or road projects, or when his estimated 15 percent contribution of the AU’s budget allows the AU to send peacekeepers to Somalia, Darfur, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. And it can be bad, when he buys weapons for rebel groups to destabilize his neighbors like Sudan and Chad." Writing for Brooking's soon after the uprising against Qaddafi began in February, Daniel Byman argued that sui generis nature of Qaddafi's Libya made looking to other countries for hints of Libya's future without him especially difficult.

"In any country, new regimes build on the institutions of old ones even as they create their own. For Tunisia and Egypt (and maybe for Bahrain, Yemen, and other countries being hit by the wave of unrest that is sweeping the Arab world), the new governments must contend with armies, judicial systems, and even political parties that began their life under the old order. But in Libya, these institutions are difficult to understand and their possible legacies even more difficult to anticipate. One of the (many) peculiarities of the Leader, as the Libyan dictator styled himself, is that he established a political system as bizarre as he is," he wrote. "Should Qaddafi go, Libya’s political structure must be rebuilt from scratch. It is not just a case of putting in a new regime, but instead of creating a new system from top to bottom. However, civil wars, as Libya is now in, are not known for creating an environment for that sort of restructuring."

MORE

Go figure!
 

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top