Police dog trainer says it's OK to for officer to punch his dog.

Lysistrata

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There are people willing to raise their fists to other people and animals. We don't know why such evil exists in humans, but people like these are proof that it does. I am no saint. I know what I'd like to do to this guy.
 
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pknopp

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There are people willing to raise their fists to other people and animals. We don't know why such evil exists in humans, but people like these are proof that it does. I am no saint. I know what I'd like to do to this guy.
He was doing as he was trained. Granted I do not believe "I was just doing my job" is a valid excuse but this goes far beyond this one officer.
 

fncceo

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There are different kinds of police dogs. Search dogs for various things (including people), rescue dogs, and there there are siege dogs.

Siege dogs are a literal breed apart. These are not lap dogs that socialites carry in a purse. Most domesticated animals are bred and trained from puppies to enhance their bite inhibition, siege dogs are not. They bite. They actually enjoy biting. A siege dog, introduced into a situation is jacked up to bite, he loves to bite. Police are warned to NEVER get in front of a siege dog on a job or come between him and his trainer. A siege dog will bite a cop or an offender, he doesn't care. He just wants to get his teeth into something.

A siege dog, who doesn't get a chance to bite is the equivalent of a blue-balled meth head. He will be visibly upset and will often bite his handler just to release his stress. Handlers know this and will, sometimes, willingly take that bite knowing it is the only thing that will calm the dog down. Most siege dog handlers I know have been bit. A siege dog is a non-lethal weapon, in certain situations more effective that a Taser or OC spray or a baton.

People often wonder why police would have such a viscous dog in their arsenal. The simple answer is, they save lives. Not just police lives (which are important). They save offender lives as well. While a bite from a siege dog will be incredibly painful and often leave a scar, they are not lethal. When an armed substance-affected or mentally incapacitated offender is posing a threat to the public, and other non-lethal options would be ineffective, a siege dog on the scene will give police an option other than shooting him. That bite could save that offender's life.

I don't know the particulars of what this officer said, but I am not surprised if a handler had to give a siege dog a less than friendly poke to the snout just to get his attention off wanting to take a hunk of meat out of something and back on his job. Much like giving a hysterical person a slap to get them back in focus. I've seen a jacked-up siege dog and, l know that saying "Sit!" even if you offer him a piece of bacon, ain't gonna do it.

These are not your grandmother's Pekinese.
 
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pknopp

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There are different kinds of police dogs. Search dogs for various things (including people), rescue dogs, and there there are siege dogs.

Siege dogs are a literal breed apart. These are not lap dogs that socialites carry in a purse. Most domesticated animals are bred and trained from puppies to enhance their bite inhibition, siege dogs are not. They bite. They actually enjoy biting. A siege dog, introduced into a situation is jacked up to bite, he loves to bite. Police are warned to NEVER get in front of a siege dog on a job or come between him and his trainer. A siege dog will bite a cop or an offender, he doesn't care. He just wants to get his teeth into something.
No animal should be bred or trained to do that.

A siege dog, who doesn't get a chance to bite is the equivalent of a blue-balled meth head. He will be visibly upset and will often bite his handler just to release his stress. Handlers know this and will, sometimes, willingly take that bite knowing it is the only thing that will calm the dog down. Most siege dog handlers I know have been bit. A siege dog is a non-lethal weapon, in certain situations more effective that a Taser or OC spray or a baton.

People often wonder why police would have such a viscous dog in their arsenal. The simple answer is, they save lives. Not just police lives (which are important). They save offender lives as well. While a bite from a siege dog will be incredibly painful and often leave a scar, they are not lethal. When an armed substance-affected or mentally incapacitated offender is posing a threat to the public, and other non-lethal options would be ineffective, a siege dog on the scene will give police an option other than shooting him. That bite could save that offender's life.

I don't know the particulars of what this officer said, but I am not surprised if a handler had to give a siege do a less than friendly poke to the snout just to get his attention off wanting to take a hunk of meat out of something and back on his job. Much like giving a hysterical person a slap to get them back in focus. I've seen a jacked-up siege dog and, l know that saying "Sit!" even if you offer him a piece of bacon, ain't gonna do it.

These are not your grandmother's Pekinese.
It's animal abuse.
 

fncceo

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No animal should be bred or trained to do that.
We can argue the ethics over using animals to save human lives, such as testing cures for disease, or searching for explosives if you like.

But not many people how aren't Ingrid Newkirk would state categorically that human lives are less important than animal lives.
 
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pknopp

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No animal should be bred or trained to do that.
We can argue the ethics over using animals to save human lives, such as testing cures for disease, or searching for explosives if you like.

But not many people how aren't Ingrid Newkirk would state categorically that human lives are less important than animal lives.
I would hope that dogs that search for explosives don't have to be abused to be trained to do that.
 

Tipsycatlover

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When I got my little girl, a toy poodle, a co-worker's standard poodle stepped up to mama dog her and teach her discipline. When the puppy misbehaved a giant paw the size of the entire puppy body would press her down and hold her there until she shut up and behaved. Dogs are tough with trainees.
 

fncceo

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No animal should be bred or trained to do that.
We can argue the ethics over using animals to save human lives, such as testing cures for disease, or searching for explosives if you like.

But not many people how aren't Ingrid Newkirk would state categorically that human lives are less important than animal lives.
I would hope that dogs that search for explosives don't have to be abused to be trained to do that.
No, I'm sure they lead full, self-actualized lives full of hugs, and bacon bits up until the moment they get turned into chutney by an IED.
 

Godboy

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I'll bet it no longer will be. I am totally against the police using dogs in this manner to start with and maybe something like this will get the ball rolling on stopping it.

Video shows California officer punch K-9 during training, witness says he heard dog ‘crying’

Another example of the kinds of people who have no business being police officers. Abusing animals has long been a sign of deep psychological problems.
Hey, what do you know, we agree on something. Fuck that guy! I can see smacking a dog that lunges at you, but repeatedly punching a dog that is held down like that is not fucking cool at all.
 

Godboy

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I'll bet it no longer will be. I am totally against the police using dogs in this manner to start with and maybe something like this will get the ball rolling on stopping it.

Video shows California officer punch K-9 during training, witness says he heard dog ‘crying’

Another example of the kinds of people who have no business being police officers. Abusing animals has long been a sign of deep psychological problems.
I think it's fine to use dogs and other animals in the service of people, even if it sometimes means putting the animal through a certain amount of discomfort. What that cop did was immoral and DUMB. Beating a dog can make them less likely to be willing to engage a violent suspect due to the dog learning from its handler that it is vulnerable. Anyway, that cop should be FIRED because he lacks the stability needed to be a police officer.
Fired? Seems he was doing as he was trained. Seems to me that this needs addressed well above the officer in question.

As an aside, I do not have a problem with animals being used in service of people. I have a problem with the police using them in police stops.
They are great for police stops. They fuck up criminals real quick in terrifying attacks. We would have a lot less crime if more criminals were mauled by police dogs.
 

Natural Citizen

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That's the way it has to be done with those dogs. Sorry, folks.
 

Gracie

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I am very much FOR police officers. In this case, I hope that cop is fired for animal abuse. Punching that dog until it cried is enough to make me crazy with anger. No excuse for it. NONE.
 

justinacolmena

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Another example of the kinds of people who have no business being police officers. Abusing animals has long been a sign of deep psychological problems.
Versus the few “good cops” obligated to back up their fellow “bad cops” who abuse us and persecute us day and night? To say nothing of double jeopardy for the same crime?

 

LA RAM FAN

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