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No Climate Change, Huh?

Mustang

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


1623982658483.png


Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.

 
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Prof.Lunaphiles

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.
You would think that the brilliant liberals would tire of being in the wrong category for their pet issues. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for brilliant liberals, that is.

Isn't there a Climate category for this subject???


But we're the dumb ones - right???
 
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airplanemechanic

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.


And another reservoir is flooding.


180,000 acre, 65 mile long lake is overflowing its banks.
 

Shelzin

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Well... that and the fact that they use more water than the thing can provide... Even under normal circumstances.
 

xband

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.

You're lost in the times. Democrats reverted back to global warming.
 

theHawk

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.

Whoever made the claim that climate doesn’t change on Earth?

The Earth has been warming up for 12,000 years. Yes some areas will dry up. Guess what, we have to adapt.

You’re delusional if you think we can “fix” climate change and reverse the natural warming of Earth. You’re the ones living in a fantasy and believing in lies.
 

CrusaderFrank

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Before Trump, Death Valley was Moderate Valley!!

How dare you!!
 

Prof.Lunaphiles

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

Maybe you should worry about the lives of the population in the contemporaneous state of Califonia. It will correctly go in the Current Events category - genius.
 

Hossfly

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Of course the sun in a cloudless sky doesn't produce any heat. It's the cow farts.
Oh, and another thing, Mustang: tell them movie stars to quit watering their lawns.
 

WEATHER53

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Climate changes
We don’t make it happen
Start looking at oceans from bottom up instead of just surface temps.
 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.

Jesus Cat-Killing Christ.

f701060ae0d9f3f47cc76a6be252136442fec79d.jpg
 

badbob85037

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.

A few years ago California was having a water shortage. You couldn't water your lawn, crops were dying in the field but California were still spilling half their fresh water in the San Francisco Bay. They dumped that water from the Sacramento River to save a fish not native to the river called a Smelt. After the water shortage California spent money, not to build their water shed but to do a count of the Smelt. The count of the Smelt in the Sacramento was one. That's 1 Smelt. Now years latter California has still not spent a dollar on what still is a major problem in the state they have less of a clue as they did years ago with now the added problem of damn collapse. This is the democRat crap that you just can't make up.
 

EMH

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.



Dear sub human science invalid....

A warmer earth is a wetter earth.

Duh...

So when your side blames droughts and low water on algore's fraud, you prove yourselves to be hopelessly lost and wrong about everything....

What is causing low land based fresh water across the globe?

Too many people sucking too much out.

Human overpopulation explains the low drinking water and fires. Algore's fraud goes 0-2.
 

Gracie

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.

So...to your small mind, all conservatives deny climate change?
Really? :rolleyes:
 

Muhammed

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Well... that and the fact that they use more water than the thing can provide... Even under normal circumstances.
And they had a very cold winter, thus less snowfall.

Must be Trump's fault.
 

Deplorable Yankee

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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.

No, conservatives will likely be denying climate change 50-100 years from now when coastal America is flooded, and we have wildfires in the dead of winter with low temperatures of only about 75 degrees, and our crops are all failing due to a lack of rain and too much heat, and people are trying to recycle their urine at home in an effort to have enough drinking water. My guess is no one will even listen to conservatives at that point, assuming that anyone is crazy enough to admit to being one.

At any rate, everyone is familiar with the concept of the double whammy, right? That's when two bad things happen that might very well be related in some way. Well, this qualifies except that it's more than just a DOUBLE whammy.

Yeah, not only are we losing sources of drinking water and water to irrigate our crops (I don't know about you, but I've gotten used to eating), but if the reservoir falls only another 60 feet during the West's current record heat wave days before summer has even arrived, CA will lose hydropower generation at this reservoir that would normally power hundreds of thousands of homes during the height of the summer heat which is also the peak of the wildfire season. Good times!

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A California reservoir is expected to fall so low that a hydro-power plant will shut down for first time​


View attachment 502683

Water in a key California reservoir will fall so low this summer that its hydroelectric power plant will be forced to shut down for the first time, officials said Thursday, straining the state's already-taxed electric grid.

An unrelenting drought and record heat, both worsened by the changing climate, have pushed the water supply at Northern California's Lake Oroville to deplete rapidly. As a result of the "alarming levels," officials will likely be forced to close the Edward Hyatt Power Plant for the first time since it opened in 1967, California Energy Commission spokesperson Lindsay Buckley told CNN.

The water in Lake Oroville — the state's second largest reservoir — is pumped through underground facilities to generate electricity, which can power up to 800,000 homes when operating at full capacity.

While the water level in the reservoir is currently hovering around 700 feet above sea level, if it continues to fall at the currently projected rate to 640 feet there will not be enough water to continue operating the Hyatt plant in two to three months, coinciding with the typical peak of the summer heat and wildfire season.

"If lake levels fall below those elevations later this summer, DWR will, for the first time, cease generation at the Hyatt power plant due to lack of sufficient water to turn the plant's electrical generation turbines," said Liza Whitmore, Public Information Officer of DWR's Oroville Field Division.

The announcement came as California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide heat wave emergency Thursday, with record setting temperatures and increased electricity use adding pressure to the grid.

"Amid a major heat wave that is stressing energy grids in states across the western United States, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an emergency proclamation to free up additional energy capacity," Newsom's office said in a press release.

The governor's declaration, citing "extreme peril" to the safety residents due to the heat wave, suspends permitting requirements to allow the immediate use of back-up power generators to help alleviate stress on the state's energy grid.
California energy grid officials have called on residents to reduce power through Friday, especially during the evenings when electricity use is at its peak. Scaling back on using power during this peak time of the day will help avoid unneeded rolling power outages and damaged power lines, state officials previously said.



To late
The experts say it's to late

So ya might as well give up NO ONE cares

 
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You would think that conservatives would tire of being on the wrong side of the issues pretty much all of the time. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for conservatives, that is.
You would think that the brilliant liberals would tire of being in the wrong category for their pet issues. Apparently not. But hey, we're all fallible humans, right? But seemingly, even fallible humans can learn from their mistakes. Except for brilliant liberals, that is.

Isn't there a Climate category for this subject???


But we're the dumb ones - right???
This particular reservoir drying up and facing a need to shut down its hydroelectric power generation is unquestionably a current event.
 

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