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New deal could lead to Scotland's independence from UK

High_Gravity

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New deal could lead to Scotland's independence from UK

London (CNN) -- More than 700 years after William Wallace died fighting for Scottish independence, and more than 300 years after Scotland and England came together in a United Kingdom, a new agreement could lead to an independent Scotland.

British Prime Minister David Cameron and his Scottish counterpart, First Minister Alex Salmond, signed a deal in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Monday paving the way for Scots to vote on independence from the United Kingdom, Cameron's office announced on Twitter. The referendum, expected to be held in 2014, would allow Scots a straight yes-or-no vote on staying in the union.

The "Yes Scotland" campaign launched in May, trying to "build a groundswell of support for an independent Scotland," with the backing of several famous Scots, most notably actor Sean Connery. Salmond and his Scottish National Party (SNP), which holds power in the Scottish parliament, have pushed for the vote.

A survey released last week by TNS-BMRB showed that only 28% of Scots favor leaving the United Kingdom.

That's somewhat in line with an Ipsos MORI poll of 1,002 Scots, taken in late August, that showed sharp political differences within Scotland. That survey showed that more than 60% of SNP supporters desire full independence. However, only about a third of all the Scots polled wanted to break away from the United Kingdom.

Some detractors have expressed concern about Scotland's economic viability as an independent state. But oil from the North Sea, off the Scottish coast, has enriched the United Kingdom for decades. And the SNP, on its website, says independence "could create an environment where our existing and new private industries can grow more easily," and the party touts a country that retains the British pound, while its future European Union membership creates the benefits of "open borders, shared rights, free trade and extensive cooperation."

Cameron has vocally opposed Scottish independence. In February, he said he was "100% clear that I will fight with everything I have to keep our United Kingdom together," since an intact United Kingdom, consisting of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, "is stronger, safer, richer and fairer."

In medieval times, Scotland fought for freedom from England, which Mel Gibson dramatically depicted in his Academy Award-winning movie "Braveheart." Not long after Wallace died in the early 1300s, Robert the Bruce led Scotland to independence, and it remained an autonomous nation until the Act of Union joined Scotland and England in 1707.

New deal could lead to Scotland's independence from UK - CNN.com
 

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.
 
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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

What benefits would the Scots get by declaring independence?
 

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New deal could lead to Scotland's independence from UK

London (CNN) -- More than 700 years after William Wallace died fighting for Scottish independence, and more than 300 years after Scotland and England came together in a United Kingdom, a new agreement could lead to an independent Scotland.

British Prime Minister David Cameron and his Scottish counterpart, First Minister Alex Salmond, signed a deal in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Monday paving the way for Scots to vote on independence from the United Kingdom, Cameron's office announced on Twitter. The referendum, expected to be held in 2014, would allow Scots a straight yes-or-no vote on staying in the union.

The "Yes Scotland" campaign launched in May, trying to "build a groundswell of support for an independent Scotland," with the backing of several famous Scots, most notably actor Sean Connery. Salmond and his Scottish National Party (SNP), which holds power in the Scottish parliament, have pushed for the vote.

A survey released last week by TNS-BMRB showed that only 28% of Scots favor leaving the United Kingdom.

That's somewhat in line with an Ipsos MORI poll of 1,002 Scots, taken in late August, that showed sharp political differences within Scotland. That survey showed that more than 60% of SNP supporters desire full independence. However, only about a third of all the Scots polled wanted to break away from the United Kingdom.

Some detractors have expressed concern about Scotland's economic viability as an independent state. But oil from the North Sea, off the Scottish coast, has enriched the United Kingdom for decades. And the SNP, on its website, says independence "could create an environment where our existing and new private industries can grow more easily," and the party touts a country that retains the British pound, while its future European Union membership creates the benefits of "open borders, shared rights, free trade and extensive cooperation."

Cameron has vocally opposed Scottish independence. In February, he said he was "100% clear that I will fight with everything I have to keep our United Kingdom together," since an intact United Kingdom, consisting of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, "is stronger, safer, richer and fairer."

In medieval times, Scotland fought for freedom from England, which Mel Gibson dramatically depicted in his Academy Award-winning movie "Braveheart." Not long after Wallace died in the early 1300s, Robert the Bruce led Scotland to independence, and it remained an autonomous nation until the Act of Union joined Scotland and England in 1707.

New deal could lead to Scotland's independence from UK - CNN.com


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLCEUpIg8rE]Braveheart - Freedom - YouTube[/ame]
 

Swagger

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

What benefits would the Scots get by declaring independence?

My guess is that the driving force behind Scotland's push for independence is the same as any other territory we subjugated in the past: self determination.

But in doing so, they'd be cutting themselves off from the biggest tax base in the British Isles: England, and all the benefits that come from it. Their only viable option to increase revenue would be to march towards the waiting arms of the Euro. And we all know where that'll get you.
 
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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

What benefits would the Scots get by declaring independence?

My guess is that the driving force behind Scotland's push for independence is the same as any other territory we subjugated in the past: self determination.

But in doing so, they'd be cutting themselves off from the biggest tax base in the British Isles: England, and all the benefits that come from it. Their only viable option to increase revenue would be to march towards the waiting arms of the Euro. And we all know where that'll get you.

Hmm, might be better off to stay under the UK Banner.
 

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scotland-rampant-lion-lion-flag-rampant-scotland-300x168.jpg

Scotland forever!
 

OohPooPahDoo

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Kevin_Kennedy

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

I've read that England is more interested in Scottish independence than Scotland is.
 

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Can I just add that the most vocal proponent for "Scotland Forever", a Mr. Sean Connery, has spent most of his adult life living in the Bahamas.
 

Swagger

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

I've read that England is more interested in Scottish independence than Scotland is.

How so? Personally speaking, I'd rather they remained part of the United Kingdom.
 

decker

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.
i doubt scotish people will vote for this. far to risky for them.
 

decker

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

I've read that England is more interested in Scottish independence than Scotland is.

How so? Personally speaking, I'd rather they remained part of the United Kingdom.
same here. scotland better off part of the union. economicey they will be taking a big risk going alone.
 

decker

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What benefits would the Scots get by declaring independence?

My guess is that the driving force behind Scotland's push for independence is the same as any other territory we subjugated in the past: self determination.

But in doing so, they'd be cutting themselves off from the biggest tax base in the British Isles: England, and all the benefits that come from it. Their only viable option to increase revenue would be to march towards the waiting arms of the Euro. And we all know where that'll get you.

Hmm, might be better off to stay under the UK Banner.
Alex samond knows deep down he can,t win this vote. polls show no to this far higher then yes. That why he wanted more then one question on ballot paper to save face.

he taking a big political risk with this.
 

Kevin_Kennedy

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.

I've read that England is more interested in Scottish independence than Scotland is.

How so? Personally speaking, I'd rather they remained part of the United Kingdom.

I think it might have been a poll that said more English people would support Scottish independence than Scottish people, because all the polling I've seen suggests that independence is going to fail.
 

decker

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I've read that England is more interested in Scottish independence than Scotland is.

How so? Personally speaking, I'd rather they remained part of the United Kingdom.

I think it might have been a poll that said more English people would support Scottish independence than Scottish people, because all the polling I've seen suggests that independence is going to fail.
yep same here. most scots on british news were very skeptical about indepedence. What been benefits to their daily lives of going alone. far too risky when alex samond not explained how money wise their be better off
 

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The exploration rights granted to British companies currently extracting oil and gas from below the North Sea belong to the United Kingdom. If Scotland does become an independent nation, they'll have to buy those resources from the UK. Also, prospective energy companies will be unwilling to impinge upon the monoploies enjoyed by the likes of BP and British Gas.

Another thing that also escapes the attention of the Scottish pro-independence brigade is the conspicuous absence of indigenous private industry in Scotland. If Scotland is granted independence, what private industry that still exists in Scotland may be inclined to relocate back to England and elsewhere; as the SNP is a hard-left party that may worry potential investors. England, however, enjoys ample private industry compared to its Celtic neighbours. Not to mention Scotland would be withdrawing from the security of the pound. They'd be ripe for an even more hidious episode of exploitation and economic slavery under the Euro than they ever were under their Saxon overlord.

Having said that, though, I'd be interested to see how Scotland would fair if it went it alone. Ireland, for instance, flourished under London's direct control. Look where they are now.
i doubt scotish people will vote for this. far to risky for them.

They are not idiots. The 'Barnett Formula' guarantees the Scotts an extra 25p of public money spent per pound spent in England. This equally applies to Wales and NI. That's why they don't want to leave the union. And, that's why I and many other English wouldn't give a toss if they went independant - we 'Sassenachs' wouldn't have to prop up the generous social services they do and we don't enjoy. In short - stop whinging Scotts or piss off and vote for independance, and see how long your oil will keep you going, cos there are plenty of regions of England that could do with the dosh wasted on you.

PS. Isn't it pathetic that Mel Gibson and the events of 700 years ago have to play a part in this discussion. Oh well, it is the US/hollywood history message board after all.

PPS. Actually, the oil rights wouldn't have to be bought. They'd be split, and assigned to Scotland in a similar manner that the North Sea oil rights were originally split and assigned to the various nations bordering it.
 
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