Medieval Wine Windows Used in Restaurants In Italy to Maintain Social Distancing

Disir

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A number of restaurants in Florence, Italy has revived a tradition that dates back to the bubonic plague: wine windows.

The measure has been implemented at various eateries, including Osteria Delle Brache, in order to ensure that drinks can be served while maintaining social distancing.

And it’s not just wine that the restaurants serve through the window; it also offers coffee, ice cream and Aperol Spritz cocktails.

According to Florentine scholar Francesco Rondinelli, wine windows were popular in the 1600s in Florence.



As restaurants and bars across the US try to reconcile with a new contactless reality, Italy has already found a nifty solution. The boot-shaped country has revived a storied tradition to get its revelers vino and aperitivo with next-to-no contact. Buchette del vino or wine windows allow bartenders to safely and easily pass beverages to customers in the time of Covid-19.



Dating back to the 1600s, the peepholes have a somewhat macabre past. They were first used in Florence during the 1634 bubonic plague as a way for merchants to sell surplus wine without touching the infected. Indeed, they were social distancing before social distancing was even a thing. Nearly 400 years on, another deadly outbreak has hit the city and the pint-sized apertures are being used once again.

I don't even drink wine and that is awesome.
 

Dick Foster

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A number of restaurants in Florence, Italy has revived a tradition that dates back to the bubonic plague: wine windows.

The measure has been implemented at various eateries, including Osteria Delle Brache, in order to ensure that drinks can be served while maintaining social distancing.

And it’s not just wine that the restaurants serve through the window; it also offers coffee, ice cream and Aperol Spritz cocktails.

According to Florentine scholar Francesco Rondinelli, wine windows were popular in the 1600s in Florence.



As restaurants and bars across the US try to reconcile with a new contactless reality, Italy has already found a nifty solution. The boot-shaped country has revived a storied tradition to get its revelers vino and aperitivo with next-to-no contact. Buchette del vino or wine windows allow bartenders to safely and easily pass beverages to customers in the time of Covid-19.



Dating back to the 1600s, the peepholes have a somewhat macabre past. They were first used in Florence during the 1634 bubonic plague as a way for merchants to sell surplus wine without touching the infected. Indeed, they were social distancing before social distancing was even a thing. Nearly 400 years on, another deadly outbreak has hit the city and the pint-sized apertures are being used once again.

I don't even drink wine and that is awesome.
It seems there's nothing really new under the sun.
 
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Disir

Disir

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Nope. Sure isn't.
 

skye

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Ahhhhh......I love it.....no matter the circumstances ....the Italians will always have style! :biggrin:
 

Picaro

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We used to have an Italian place here that had old fashioned enclosed booths with 'Dutch' style doors on them. It was pretty nice, great spaghetti and eggplant dishes.
 

Not2BSubjugated

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A number of restaurants in Florence, Italy has revived a tradition that dates back to the bubonic plague: wine windows.

The measure has been implemented at various eateries, including Osteria Delle Brache, in order to ensure that drinks can be served while maintaining social distancing.

And it’s not just wine that the restaurants serve through the window; it also offers coffee, ice cream and Aperol Spritz cocktails.

According to Florentine scholar Francesco Rondinelli, wine windows were popular in the 1600s in Florence.



As restaurants and bars across the US try to reconcile with a new contactless reality, Italy has already found a nifty solution. The boot-shaped country has revived a storied tradition to get its revelers vino and aperitivo with next-to-no contact. Buchette del vino or wine windows allow bartenders to safely and easily pass beverages to customers in the time of Covid-19.



Dating back to the 1600s, the peepholes have a somewhat macabre past. They were first used in Florence during the 1634 bubonic plague as a way for merchants to sell surplus wine without touching the infected. Indeed, they were social distancing before social distancing was even a thing. Nearly 400 years on, another deadly outbreak has hit the city and the pint-sized apertures are being used once again.

I don't even drink wine and that is awesome.
Great find on that article. Covid's had me thinking about this sorta thing a lot, for obvious reasons. One of the things that I firmly believe got nations such as Taiwan and South Korea through this so smoothly by comparison to the Americas and Europe, is that their culture was so recently shaped by similar coronavirus outbreaks. Essentially, they still remembered what measures they took to combat this exact sort of phenomenon, whereas here in the west we haven't dealt with anything like this since the Spanish flu.

IMO, part of what these differences in response effectiveness show us is that, going forward, we should do what we can to maintain an awareness of individual techniques for plague mitigation. Your article brings this to mind because these wine windows are obviously a solid idea, yet something that I'd never heard of before reading this post. These are the sorts of useful traditions that all children should have explained to them, just in case.

Before anybody turns this into a Trump good/Trump bad conversation. . . while I've got my own beliefs on this, I'm not trying to make any implications in this post about how impactful the response of a nation's government is. That's a different conversation, and I'm only referring to something that I feel is an obvious contributing factor to a society's response as a whole.
 

Muhammed

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A number of restaurants in Florence, Italy has revived a tradition that dates back to the bubonic plague: wine windows.

The measure has been implemented at various eateries, including Osteria Delle Brache, in order to ensure that drinks can be served while maintaining social distancing.

And it’s not just wine that the restaurants serve through the window; it also offers coffee, ice cream and Aperol Spritz cocktails.

According to Florentine scholar Francesco Rondinelli, wine windows were popular in the 1600s in Florence.



As restaurants and bars across the US try to reconcile with a new contactless reality, Italy has already found a nifty solution. The boot-shaped country has revived a storied tradition to get its revelers vino and aperitivo with next-to-no contact. Buchette del vino or wine windows allow bartenders to safely and easily pass beverages to customers in the time of Covid-19.



Dating back to the 1600s, the peepholes have a somewhat macabre past. They were first used in Florence during the 1634 bubonic plague as a way for merchants to sell surplus wine without touching the infected. Indeed, they were social distancing before social distancing was even a thing. Nearly 400 years on, another deadly outbreak has hit the city and the pint-sized apertures are being used once again.

I don't even drink wine and that is awesome.
 

Picaro

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A number of restaurants in Florence, Italy has revived a tradition that dates back to the bubonic plague: wine windows.

The measure has been implemented at various eateries, including Osteria Delle Brache, in order to ensure that drinks can be served while maintaining social distancing.

And it’s not just wine that the restaurants serve through the window; it also offers coffee, ice cream and Aperol Spritz cocktails.

According to Florentine scholar Francesco Rondinelli, wine windows were popular in the 1600s in Florence.



As restaurants and bars across the US try to reconcile with a new contactless reality, Italy has already found a nifty solution. The boot-shaped country has revived a storied tradition to get its revelers vino and aperitivo with next-to-no contact. Buchette del vino or wine windows allow bartenders to safely and easily pass beverages to customers in the time of Covid-19.



Dating back to the 1600s, the peepholes have a somewhat macabre past. They were first used in Florence during the 1634 bubonic plague as a way for merchants to sell surplus wine without touching the infected. Indeed, they were social distancing before social distancing was even a thing. Nearly 400 years on, another deadly outbreak has hit the city and the pint-sized apertures are being used once again.

I don't even drink wine and that is awesome.
Great find on that article. Covid's had me thinking about this sorta thing a lot, for obvious reasons. One of the things that I firmly believe got nations such as Taiwan and South Korea through this so smoothly by comparison to the Americas and Europe, is that their culture was so recently shaped by similar coronavirus outbreaks. Essentially, they still remembered what measures they took to combat this exact sort of phenomenon, whereas here in the west we haven't dealt with anything like this since the Spanish flu.

IMO, part of what these differences in response effectiveness show us is that, going forward, we should do what we can to maintain an awareness of individual techniques for plague mitigation. Your article brings this to mind because these wine windows are obviously a solid idea, yet something that I'd never heard of before reading this post. These are the sorts of useful traditions that all children should have explained to them, just in case.

Before anybody turns this into a Trump good/Trump bad conversation. . . while I've got my own beliefs on this, I'm not trying to make any implications in this post about how impactful the response of a nation's government is. That's a different conversation, and I'm only referring to something that I feel is an obvious contributing factor to a society's response as a whole.
Yes, masks and the like have been a 'thing' in Asia for many years now, and the trend was also showing up here before the corona virus outbreak, with people wearing masks in pubic; not a lot, but certainly a noticeable trend even here in Texas. We're just going to play catch up, is all, and it will stay around after this virus goes away.
 

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