History Hidden In Government School

PoliticalChic

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1. Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French verion.


But.....today is the anniversary of the inauguration of.....

1585664334775.png

March 31st....
The 984-foot (300-metre) Eiffel Tower, a wrought iron technological masterpiece created by Gustave Eiffel to commemorate the centenary of the French Revolution, was officially inaugurated in Paris this day in 1889.
Britannica.com




2. But what is rarely mentioned is that the geography on which it is built is historic, as well....
A massacre took place there, playing a significant role during the French Revolution.....

...and the man in charge of said massacre was........


14th July 1789: Armed citizens storm and capture the Bastille.
15th July 1789: Lafayette was appointed Commander of National Guard.

The very same Lafayette who aided George Washington....



3. "During the French Revolution, on 17 July 1791, the Champ de Mars in Paris was the site of a massacre', the fusillade du Champ-de-Mars. On that day, the National Constituent Assembly issued a decree that the king, Louis XVI, would remain king under a constitutional monarchy. Later that day, leaders of the republicans in France rallied against this decision."


"....A large crowd gathered at the Champ de Mars to sign the petition. The marquis de Lafayette and the National Guard, which was under his command,....the crowd, led by Danton....

....the National Guard opened fire directly on the crowd. The exact numbers of dead and wounded are unknown; estimates range from a dozen to fifty dead." Champ de Mars Massacre - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


The reputation of Lafayette suffered greatly...and never recovered.



4. The Champ de Mars Massacre resonated with the French in much the same way that the Boston Massacre did in America.
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."
( Often attributed to Mark Twain )
 
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1585668873619.png

March 31st, 1811 Bunsen born!
German chemist Robert Wilhelm Bunsen, who observed that each element emits a light of characteristic wavelength, was born in Göttingen, Westphalia.
Britannica.com


And, there's this:
"Bunsen also invented the filter pump (1868), the ice calorimeter (1870), and the vapour calorimeter (1887). Though he is generally credited with the invention of the Bunsen burner, he seems to have contributed to its development only in a minor way."



Without the Bunsen Burner, I never would have been able to rush into organic chemistry lab to brew a cup of Orange Pekoe Unknown!
1585669124709.png
 

whitehall

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The French Revolution was a social upheaval rather than a political event when the decadent French aristocracy became a symbol of oppression. There was no immediate effort to create a constitutional government as citizens ran wild and the French royalty was executed. The American revolution was a systematic effort to separate the Colonies from British rule. The causes and events are vastly different and the only similarity is that they were both called "revolutions".
 
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PoliticalChic

PoliticalChic

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The French Revolution was a social upheaval rather than a political event when the decadent French aristocracy became a symbol of oppression. There was no immediate effort to create a constitutional government as citizens ran wild and the French royalty was executed. The American revolution was a systematic effort to separate the Colonies from British rule. The causes and events are vastly different and the only similarity is that they were both called "revolutions".

'The French Revolution was a social upheaval rather than a political event when the decadent French aristocracy became a symbol of oppression. '


Now....to bring it up-to-date:

"If the French revolution was the end of monarchy and aristocratic privilege and the emergence of the common man and democratic rights, it was also the beginnings of modern totalitarian government and large-scale executions of "enemies of the People" by impersonal government entities (Robespierre's "Committee of Public Safety"). This legacy would not reach its fullest bloom until the tragic arrival of the German Nazis and Soviet and Chinese communists of the 20th century. "
 

alang1216

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1. Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French verion.


But.....today is the anniversary of the inauguration of.....

View attachment 317480
March 31st....
The 984-foot (300-metre) Eiffel Tower, a wrought iron technological masterpiece created by Gustave Eiffel to commemorate the centenary of the French Revolution, was officially inaugurated in Paris this day in 1889.
Britannica.com




2. But what is rarely mentioned is that the geography on which it is built is historic, as well....
A massacre took place there, playing a significant role during the French Revolution.....

...and the man in charge of said massacre was........


14th July 1789: Armed citizens storm and capture the Bastille.
15th July 1789: Lafayette was appointed Commander of National Guard.

The very same Lafayette who aided George Washington....



3. "During the French Revolution, on 17 July 1791, the Champ de Mars in Paris was the site of a massacre', the fusillade du Champ-de-Mars. On that day, the National Constituent Assembly issued a decree that the king, Louis XVI, would remain king under a constitutional monarchy. Later that day, leaders of the republicans in France rallied against this decision."


"....A large crowd gathered at the Champ de Mars to sign the petition. The marquis de Lafayette and the National Guard, which was under his command,....the crowd, led by Danton....

....the National Guard opened fire directly on the crowd. The exact numbers of dead and wounded are unknown; estimates range from a dozen to fifty dead." Champ de Mars Massacre - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


The reputation of Lafayette suffered greatly...and never recovered.



4. The Champ de Mars Massacre resonated with the French in much the same way that the Boston Massacre did in America.
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."
( Often attributed to Mark Twain )
What I learned in gov't school was that the French Revolution was a fight between the mob/peasants/proletariat/poor and the ruling class. The American Revolution was a fight between the American ruling class and their British overlords. The peasants had little to lose, the American ruling class had everything to lose so it is hardly surprising that the two revolutions went very differently.

Unfortunately for the Tsar, he didn't learn the lesson of the French and suffered their fate. With the growing income inequality in this country we'd better learn our lesson from the French before it is too late.
 
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PoliticalChic

PoliticalChic

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1. Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French verion.


But.....today is the anniversary of the inauguration of.....

View attachment 317480
March 31st....
The 984-foot (300-metre) Eiffel Tower, a wrought iron technological masterpiece created by Gustave Eiffel to commemorate the centenary of the French Revolution, was officially inaugurated in Paris this day in 1889.
Britannica.com




2. But what is rarely mentioned is that the geography on which it is built is historic, as well....
A massacre took place there, playing a significant role during the French Revolution.....

...and the man in charge of said massacre was........


14th July 1789: Armed citizens storm and capture the Bastille.
15th July 1789: Lafayette was appointed Commander of National Guard.

The very same Lafayette who aided George Washington....



3. "During the French Revolution, on 17 July 1791, the Champ de Mars in Paris was the site of a massacre', the fusillade du Champ-de-Mars. On that day, the National Constituent Assembly issued a decree that the king, Louis XVI, would remain king under a constitutional monarchy. Later that day, leaders of the republicans in France rallied against this decision."


"....A large crowd gathered at the Champ de Mars to sign the petition. The marquis de Lafayette and the National Guard, which was under his command,....the crowd, led by Danton....

....the National Guard opened fire directly on the crowd. The exact numbers of dead and wounded are unknown; estimates range from a dozen to fifty dead." Champ de Mars Massacre - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


The reputation of Lafayette suffered greatly...and never recovered.



4. The Champ de Mars Massacre resonated with the French in much the same way that the Boston Massacre did in America.
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."
( Often attributed to Mark Twain )
What I learned in gov't school was that the French Revolution was a fight between the mob/peasants/proletariat/poor and the ruling class. The American Revolution was a fight between the American ruling class and their British overlords. The peasants had little to lose, the American ruling class had everything to lose so it is hardly surprising that the two revolutions went very differently.

Unfortunately for the Tsar, he didn't learn the lesson of the French and suffered their fate. With the growing income inequality in this country we'd better learn our lesson from the French before it is too late.
 
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PoliticalChic

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See how lucky you are to have turned in today.....look what you just learned:


Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French version.
 
OP
PoliticalChic

PoliticalChic

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And yet another momentous March 31st event!

The result of the Republicans prying their slaves away from 'em, and making certain that those former slaves had real freedom:
1585671942918.png


Thomas Mundy Peterson of Perth Amboy, New Jersey was the first African-American to vote in an election under the just-enacted provisions of the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution. His vote was cast on March 31, 1870. Wikipedia


Democrats have been sulking ever since.
 

Unkotare

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An oft-overlooked aspect of the French Revolution is that the French women-folk were the ones to get the ball rolling.
 
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PoliticalChic

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The French Revolution was a social upheaval rather than a political event ...
It was both, not to mention an economic phenomenon.

What a failure it was!!


From the novel “Napoleon’ Pyramids,” by William Dietrich



April 13, 1798, was a Friday. But it was springtime in revolutionary Paris, meaning that under the Directory’s new calendar it was the twenty-forth day of the month of Germinal in the Year Six, and the next day of rest was still six days distant, not two.

Has any reform been more futile? The Government’s arrogant discard of Christianity means that weeks have been extended to ten days instead of seven. The revision’s intent is to supplant the papal calendar with a uniform alternative of twelve months of thirty days each, based on the system of ancient Egypt. Bibles themselves were torn up to make paper gun cartridges in the grim days of 1793, and now the biblical week has been guillotined, each month instead divided into three decades of ten days, with the year, with the year beginning at the autumn equinox and five to six holidays added to balance idealism with our solar orbit. Not content with regimenting the calendar, the government has introduced a new metric system for weight and measure. There are even proposals for a new clock of precisely 100,000 seconds each day. Reason, reason!...The new calendar is the kind of logical idea imposed by clever people that completely ignores habit, emotion, and human nature and thus forecasts the Revolution’s doom.





Your colonial revolution was one of political independence. This one in France is about the very order of life. My God, a king guillotined! Thousands sent to slaughter! Wars unleashed on every French border! Atheism enshrined! Church lands seized, debts ignored, estates confiscated, rabbles armed, riots, anarchy, and tyranny!
 

Marion Morrison

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1. Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French verion.


But.....today is the anniversary of the inauguration of.....

View attachment 317480
March 31st....
The 984-foot (300-metre) Eiffel Tower, a wrought iron technological masterpiece created by Gustave Eiffel to commemorate the centenary of the French Revolution, was officially inaugurated in Paris this day in 1889.
Britannica.com




2. But what is rarely mentioned is that the geography on which it is built is historic, as well....
A massacre took place there, playing a significant role during the French Revolution.....

...and the man in charge of said massacre was........


14th July 1789: Armed citizens storm and capture the Bastille.
15th July 1789: Lafayette was appointed Commander of National Guard.

The very same Lafayette who aided George Washington....



3. "During the French Revolution, on 17 July 1791, the Champ de Mars in Paris was the site of a massacre', the fusillade du Champ-de-Mars. On that day, the National Constituent Assembly issued a decree that the king, Louis XVI, would remain king under a constitutional monarchy. Later that day, leaders of the republicans in France rallied against this decision."


"....A large crowd gathered at the Champ de Mars to sign the petition. The marquis de Lafayette and the National Guard, which was under his command,....the crowd, led by Danton....

....the National Guard opened fire directly on the crowd. The exact numbers of dead and wounded are unknown; estimates range from a dozen to fifty dead." Champ de Mars Massacre - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


The reputation of Lafayette suffered greatly...and never recovered.



4. The Champ de Mars Massacre resonated with the French in much the same way that the Boston Massacre did in America.
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."
( Often attributed to Mark Twain )
What I learned in gov't school was that the French Revolution was a fight between the mob/peasants/proletariat/poor and the ruling class. The American Revolution was a fight between the American ruling class and their British overlords. The peasants had little to lose, the American ruling class had everything to lose so it is hardly surprising that the two revolutions went very differently.

Unfortunately for the Tsar, he didn't learn the lesson of the French and suffered their fate. With the growing income inequality in this country we'd better learn our lesson from the French before it is too late.
Spoken like a true Commie.
 
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PoliticalChic

PoliticalChic

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1. Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French verion.


But.....today is the anniversary of the inauguration of.....

View attachment 317480
March 31st....
The 984-foot (300-metre) Eiffel Tower, a wrought iron technological masterpiece created by Gustave Eiffel to commemorate the centenary of the French Revolution, was officially inaugurated in Paris this day in 1889.
Britannica.com




2. But what is rarely mentioned is that the geography on which it is built is historic, as well....
A massacre took place there, playing a significant role during the French Revolution.....

...and the man in charge of said massacre was........


14th July 1789: Armed citizens storm and capture the Bastille.
15th July 1789: Lafayette was appointed Commander of National Guard.

The very same Lafayette who aided George Washington....



3. "During the French Revolution, on 17 July 1791, the Champ de Mars in Paris was the site of a massacre', the fusillade du Champ-de-Mars. On that day, the National Constituent Assembly issued a decree that the king, Louis XVI, would remain king under a constitutional monarchy. Later that day, leaders of the republicans in France rallied against this decision."


"....A large crowd gathered at the Champ de Mars to sign the petition. The marquis de Lafayette and the National Guard, which was under his command,....the crowd, led by Danton....

....the National Guard opened fire directly on the crowd. The exact numbers of dead and wounded are unknown; estimates range from a dozen to fifty dead." Champ de Mars Massacre - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


The reputation of Lafayette suffered greatly...and never recovered.



4. The Champ de Mars Massacre resonated with the French in much the same way that the Boston Massacre did in America.
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."
( Often attributed to Mark Twain )
What I learned in gov't school was that the French Revolution was a fight between the mob/peasants/proletariat/poor and the ruling class. The American Revolution was a fight between the American ruling class and their British overlords. The peasants had little to lose, the American ruling class had everything to lose so it is hardly surprising that the two revolutions went very differently.

Unfortunately for the Tsar, he didn't learn the lesson of the French and suffered their fate. With the growing income inequality in this country we'd better learn our lesson from the French before it is too late.
Spoken like a true Commie.

I miss that 'star' button.
 

alang1216

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See how lucky you are to have turned in today.....look what you just learned:


Although contemporary, the American Revolution was the very antithesis of the French Revolution.
The latter, based on anti-religion, the American version infused with the Judeo-Christian faith.
That's why ours didn't become a slaughter house, as did the French version.
Or you could be wrong. I see no evidence that the French Revolution was a religious and not a political/economic revolution. That's not to say the Catholic Church was not on the wrong side of the political and economic issues and got itself burned as a result.
 

Marion Morrison

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The French Revolution was a social upheaval rather than a political event ...
It was both, not to mention an economic phenomenon.

What a failure it was!!


From the novel “Napoleon’ Pyramids,” by William Dietrich



April 13, 1798, was a Friday. But it was springtime in revolutionary Paris, meaning that under the Directory’s new calendar it was the twenty-forth day of the month of Germinal in the Year Six, and the next day of rest was still six days distant, not two.

Has any reform been more futile? The Government’s arrogant discard of Christianity means that weeks have been extended to ten days instead of seven. The revision’s intent is to supplant the papal calendar with a uniform alternative of twelve months of thirty days each, based on the system of ancient Egypt. Bibles themselves were torn up to make paper gun cartridges in the grim days of 1793, and now the biblical week has been guillotined, each month instead divided into three decades of ten days, with the year, with the year beginning at the autumn equinox and five to six holidays added to balance idealism with our solar orbit. Not content with regimenting the calendar, the government has introduced a new metric system for weight and measure. There are even proposals for a new clock of precisely 100,000 seconds each day. Reason, reason!...The new calendar is the kind of logical idea imposed by clever people that completely ignores habit, emotion, and human nature and thus forecasts the Revolution’s doom.





Your colonial revolution was one of political independence. This one in France is about the very order of life. My God, a king guillotined! Thousands sent to slaughter! Wars unleashed on every French border! Atheism enshrined! Church lands seized, debts ignored, estates confiscated, rabbles armed, riots, anarchy, and tyranny!
Wow! The French were Commie before Commies! That's Orwellian! :omg:

Maybe them getting conquered by the Nazis was karma.
 

alang1216

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And yet another momentous March 31st event!

The result of the Republicans prying their slaves away from 'em, and making certain that those former slaves had real freedom:
View attachment 317521

Thomas Mundy Peterson of Perth Amboy, New Jersey was the first African-American to vote in an election under the just-enacted provisions of the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution. His vote was cast on March 31, 1870. Wikipedia


Democrats have been sulking ever since.
And he didn't even have a picture ID. Ah the good old days.
 

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