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Has anyone else noticed that the Christian right has been quiescent about "Charlottesville?"

usmbguest5318

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In listening to news reports and commentary in the aftermath of "Charlottesville," I've not seen any of the major leaders of the white Protestant Christian right denouncing the hatred and violence that last weekend took place there.

I'm not saying no Christian leaders have condemned the white supremacists/supremacy, white nationalists, and racists. I'm saying that surprisingly few have.
  • Cardinal Blase Cupich, leader of the Archdiocese of Chicago, said, "When it comes to racism, there is only one side: to stand against it."
  • Russell Moore, political leader of the Southern Baptist Convention, tweeted, "The so-called Alt-Right white supremacist ideologies are anti-Christ and satanic to the core. We should say so."
Franklin Graham, on the other hand, has condemned nothing and shown notably more tacit tolerance of the ideological underpinnings that fomented the rally. Instead Graham has said only that we should "pray for Governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe, law enforcement, and everyone struggling to deal with the chaos and violence that reared its ugly head in Charlottesville." Graham's relative silence on "Charlottesville" is characteristic of the overwhelming majority of white Christian leaders, at least as far as I have observed.

Jemar Tisby, president of the Reformed African American Network, wrote in The Washington Post:
Despite all our efforts, some white pastors still remain silent on Sunday. They relegate racism to the status of a “social” issue and not a “gospel” issue. Leadership in churches and other Christian organizations remain all or mostly white. It’s the same with the boards of directors and trustees of these institutions. Evangelicals who prostitute the faith for political power remain in the pulpit and are given wide latitude to stir up racial resentment in the guise of “race neutral” language.
Racial divisions have been part of the American church for as long as it has existed. Many early denominational splits were driven by Christians who supported slavery and justified it with Bible verses. Historians argue that the spread of Christian private schools in the South in the 1960s and ’70s was largely driven by racism. White supremacy is undeniably a part of the history of American Christianity, as is abolition, and support for civil rights. Clashes over race have roiled congregations for as long as they’ve been in America.

And it’s not just history, either. Much of the anger directed at white Christians following the Charlottesville attacks was tied to Trump. Some people believe his election empowered white-supremacist fringe groups like those who gathered in at the “Unite the Right” rally this weekend. They blame white Christians for enabling this to happen: Eighty percent of white evangelicals voted for the president (See also: Among white evangelicals, regular churchgoers are the most supportive of Trump), as did 60 percent of white Catholics. At best, they ignored or dismissed Trump’s appeal to these racist fringe groups, these critics say; at worst, they were complicit.

And to top it all of, as I type this, Ms. Heyer's memorial service is underway. Is Donald Trump there? Nope. Apparently the most rueful and palpable outcome of the Charlottesville violence doesn't move Trump in accordance with how it may have seemed when he issued his remarks about it...yet another "wink and nod."
 

gipper

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Since when does the Left care what Christian leaders think or say?
 

BlackFlag

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They sympathize with the terrorist, so they're not going to say much.
 

g5000

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Everyone should be on the street to oppose the Nazis.

Conservative churches, liberal churches, liberal social organizations, conservative social organizations. All of America united to defeat the Nazis, and we should be doing it again.

Silence is assent.
 

jillian

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Since when does the Left care what Christian leaders think or say?

having fun trolling today, little boy?

aren't you the ones who demand that every muslim disavow terrorists?

i don't see you or anyone else of your ilk doing anything but defending the Nazis, little boy.

you understand that, right? or is it beyond your meager IQ?
 

Norman

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In listening to news reports and commentary in the aftermath of "Charlottesville," I've not seen any of the major leaders of the white Protestant Christian right denouncing the hatred and violence that last weekend took place there.

I'm not saying no Christian leaders have condemned the white supremacists/supremacy, white nationalists, and racists. I'm saying that surprisingly few have.
  • Cardinal Blase Cupich, leader of the Archdiocese of Chicago, said, "When it comes to racism, there is only one side: to stand against it."
  • Russell Moore, political leader of the Southern Baptist Convention, tweeted, "The so-called Alt-Right white supremacist ideologies are anti-Christ and satanic to the core. We should say so."
Franklin Graham, on the other hand, has condemned nothing and shown notably more tacit tolerance of the ideological underpinnings that fomented the rally. Instead Graham has said only that we should "pray for Governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe, law enforcement, and everyone struggling to deal with the chaos and violence that reared its ugly head in Charlottesville." Graham's relative silence on "Charlottesville" is characteristic of the overwhelming majority of white Christian leaders, at least as far as I have observed.

Jemar Tisby, president of the Reformed African American Network, wrote in The Washington Post:
Despite all our efforts, some white pastors still remain silent on Sunday. They relegate racism to the status of a “social” issue and not a “gospel” issue. Leadership in churches and other Christian organizations remain all or mostly white. It’s the same with the boards of directors and trustees of these institutions. Evangelicals who prostitute the faith for political power remain in the pulpit and are given wide latitude to stir up racial resentment in the guise of “race neutral” language.
Racial divisions have been part of the American church for as long as it has existed. Many early denominational splits were driven by Christians who supported slavery and justified it with Bible verses. Historians argue that the spread of Christian private schools in the South in the 1960s and ’70s was largely driven by racism. White supremacy is undeniably a part of the history of American Christianity, as is abolition, and support for civil rights. Clashes over race have roiled congregations for as long as they’ve been in America.

And it’s not just history, either. Much of the anger directed at white Christians following the Charlottesville attacks was tied to Trump. Some people believe his election empowered white-supremacist fringe groups like those who gathered in at the “Unite the Right” rally this weekend. They blame white Christians for enabling this to happen: Eighty percent of white evangelicals voted for the president (See also: Among white evangelicals, regular churchgoers are the most supportive of Trump), as did 60 percent of white Catholics. At best, they ignored or dismissed Trump’s appeal to these racist fringe groups, these critics say; at worst, they were complicit.

And to top it all of, as I type this, Ms. Heyer's memorial service is underway. Is Donald Trump there? Nope. Apparently the most rueful and palpable outcome of the Charlottesville violence doesn't move Trump in accordance with how it may have seemed when he issued his remarks about it...yet another "wink and nod."

When have you raised these issues concerning BLM? Did enough people in the Muslim community condemn the London bridge attacks?
 

SassyIrishLass

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20882784_734221883440480_2486348253456783594_n.jpg
 

Luddly Neddite

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This is what fundies want but they should not be confused with Christians.
 

BlackFlag

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They sympathize with the terrorist, so they're not going to say much.

No they don't sympathize with terrorists, ON EITHER SIDE. As in BOTH. No reiteration necessary. Cause Christians understand English....
Note that instead of denouncing the terrorist, the "Christian" implied again that it was the victim's fault she was murdered.
 

Compost

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And it’s not just history, either. Much of the anger directed at white Christians following the Charlottesville attacks was tied to Trump. Some people believe his election empowered white-supremacist fringe groups like those who gathered in at the “Unite the Right” rally this weekend. They blame white Christians for enabling this to happen: Eighty percent of white evangelicals voted for the president (See also: Among white evangelicals, regular churchgoers are the most supportive of Trump), as did 60 percent of white Catholics. At best, they ignored or dismissed Trump’s appeal to these racist fringe groups, these critics say; at worst, they were complicit.

Interesting. Some people are angry at Christians for voting for Trump because some racist scumbags also voted for Trump. These people figure therefore, that the Christians are responsible for the bad acts of the scumbags. Why then, would these some people be satisfied with a statement from Christians denouncing the violence at all?

You've already said yourself with the example of Franklin Graham. He made a statement that he would pray for those dealing with this violence. That isn't good enough for you. He didn't specifically denounce the violence, so you claim he approves of it.

Tell us, what exact verbiage must all the Christians state in order to satisfy you?
 

The Irish Ram

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They sympathize with the terrorist, so they're not going to say much.

No they don't sympathize with terrorists, ON EITHER SIDE. As in BOTH. No reiteration necessary. Cause Christians understand English....
Note that instead of denouncing the terrorist, the "Christian" implied again that it was the victim's fault she was murdered.

What we have here is a failure to communicate. When I say, "no", and "don't" you pretend that I said "yes" and "do". I implied nothing. I said it flat out that I don't condone terrorism on either side. That is what both means. You have no comprehension of the English language. It is why our president had to take time from his busy day to dumb it down for you. And already you have forgotten the def. of both. :eusa_doh: So today's lesson is a repeat of yesterday's lesson. Both means this side and that side.

And I thought you would have learned by now that that tactic didn't work against Trump during the election, and it doesn't work here. People here can read.
You aren't as clever as you think. < again, not implied...
 
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OP
usmbguest5318

usmbguest5318

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Everyone should be on the street to oppose the Nazis.

Conservative churches, liberal churches, liberal social organizations, conservative social organizations. All of America united to defeat the Nazis, and we should be doing it again.

Silence is assent.
I agree. This is not a matter of politics, but of ethics.
 

Crixus

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In listening to news reports and commentary in the aftermath of "Charlottesville," I've not seen any of the major leaders of the white Protestant Christian right denouncing the hatred and violence that last weekend took place there.

I'm not saying no Christian leaders have condemned the white supremacists/supremacy, white nationalists, and racists. I'm saying that surprisingly few have.
  • Cardinal Blase Cupich, leader of the Archdiocese of Chicago, said, "When it comes to racism, there is only one side: to stand against it."
  • Russell Moore, political leader of the Southern Baptist Convention, tweeted, "The so-called Alt-Right white supremacist ideologies are anti-Christ and satanic to the core. We should say so."
Franklin Graham, on the other hand, has condemned nothing and shown notably more tacit tolerance of the ideological underpinnings that fomented the rally. Instead Graham has said only that we should "pray for Governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe, law enforcement, and everyone struggling to deal with the chaos and violence that reared its ugly head in Charlottesville." Graham's relative silence on "Charlottesville" is characteristic of the overwhelming majority of white Christian leaders, at least as far as I have observed.

Jemar Tisby, president of the Reformed African American Network, wrote in The Washington Post:
Despite all our efforts, some white pastors still remain silent on Sunday. They relegate racism to the status of a “social” issue and not a “gospel” issue. Leadership in churches and other Christian organizations remain all or mostly white. It’s the same with the boards of directors and trustees of these institutions. Evangelicals who prostitute the faith for political power remain in the pulpit and are given wide latitude to stir up racial resentment in the guise of “race neutral” language.
Racial divisions have been part of the American church for as long as it has existed. Many early denominational splits were driven by Christians who supported slavery and justified it with Bible verses. Historians argue that the spread of Christian private schools in the South in the 1960s and ’70s was largely driven by racism. White supremacy is undeniably a part of the history of American Christianity, as is abolition, and support for civil rights. Clashes over race have roiled congregations for as long as they’ve been in America.

And it’s not just history, either. Much of the anger directed at white Christians following the Charlottesville attacks was tied to Trump. Some people believe his election empowered white-supremacist fringe groups like those who gathered in at the “Unite the Right” rally this weekend. They blame white Christians for enabling this to happen: Eighty percent of white evangelicals voted for the president (See also: Among white evangelicals, regular churchgoers are the most supportive of Trump), as did 60 percent of white Catholics. At best, they ignored or dismissed Trump’s appeal to these racist fringe groups, these critics say; at worst, they were complicit.

And to top it all of, as I type this, Ms. Heyer's memorial service is underway. Is Donald Trump there? Nope. Apparently the most rueful and palpable outcome of the Charlottesville violence doesn't move Trump in accordance with how it may have seemed when he issued his remarks about it...yet another "wink and nod."



Why would they need to comment? You don't spend enough time condemning rape. So by default do you support forcable rape? You don't condemn honer killings so then are you good with that? In short, is it cool for me to assume you support all bad stuff because you don't denounce it publicly enough? Hell, one can say the same of me or anyone else. I wouldent have much to say about a bunch of adults acting like savages.
 
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usmbguest5318

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And it’s not just history, either. Much of the anger directed at white Christians following the Charlottesville attacks was tied to Trump. Some people believe his election empowered white-supremacist fringe groups like those who gathered in at the “Unite the Right” rally this weekend. They blame white Christians for enabling this to happen: Eighty percent of white evangelicals voted for the president (See also: Among white evangelicals, regular churchgoers are the most supportive of Trump), as did 60 percent of white Catholics. At best, they ignored or dismissed Trump’s appeal to these racist fringe groups, these critics say; at worst, they were complicit.

Interesting. Some people are angry at Christians for voting for Trump because some racist scumbags also voted for Trump. These people figure therefore, that the Christians are responsible for the bad acts of the scumbags. Why then, would these some people be satisfied with a statement from Christians denouncing the violence at all?

You've already said yourself with the example of Franklin Graham. He made a statement that he would pray for those dealing with this violence. That isn't good enough for you. He didn't specifically denounce the violence, so you claim he approves of it.

Tell us, what exact verbiage must all the Christians state in order to satisfy you?
Some people are angry at Christians for voting for Trump because some racist scumbags also voted for Trump. These people figure therefore, that the Christians are responsible for the bad acts of the scumbags.

And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers' money, and overthrew the tables;
-- John 2:15​

Perhaps....I don't know anyone who thinks as you've described. Admittedly, between Friday and today, I've only had conversations with about 50-60 people, and even were I to have discussed the matter with every person I know, that still wouldn't amount to a notable share of the U.S. population.

Even I, detesting Trump more than anyone I've ever disliked, don't think that. It's absurd to think that, wearing their "Christian hat," most Christians voted for Trump because "racist scumbags" also voted for Trump. What's far more rational is recognizing that "racist scumbags" happen to self-identify as Christians and that white Christian leaders may be fearful of risking sources of funding by denouncing them. That latter reason is a good reason to be angry at Christian leaders.

Jesus went into the temple courtyard and threw out everyone who was buying and selling there. He overturned the moneychangers’ tables and the chairs of those who sold pigeons. He told them, “Scripture says, ‘My house will be called a house of prayer,’ but you’re turning it into a gathering place for thieves!” Blind and lame people came to him in the temple courtyard, and he healed them. When the chief priests and the experts in Moses’ Teachings saw the amazing miracles he performed and the children shouting in the temple courtyard, “Hosanna to the Son of David!” they were irritated. They said to him, “Do you hear what these children are saying?” Jesus replied, “Yes, I do. Have you never read, ‘From the mouths of little children and infants, you have created praise’?” He left them and went out of the city to Bethany and spent the night there.
-- Matthew 21:12-17
[
 

Crixus

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And it’s not just history, either. Much of the anger directed at white Christians following the Charlottesville attacks was tied to Trump. Some people believe his election empowered white-supremacist fringe groups like those who gathered in at the “Unite the Right” rally this weekend. They blame white Christians for enabling this to happen: Eighty percent of white evangelicals voted for the president (See also: Among white evangelicals, regular churchgoers are the most supportive of Trump), as did 60 percent of white Catholics. At best, they ignored or dismissed Trump’s appeal to these racist fringe groups, these critics say; at worst, they were complicit.

Interesting. Some people are angry at Christians for voting for Trump because some racist scumbags also voted for Trump. These people figure therefore, that the Christians are responsible for the bad acts of the scumbags. Why then, would these some people be satisfied with a statement from Christians denouncing the violence at all?

You've already said yourself with the example of Franklin Graham. He made a statement that he would pray for those dealing with this violence. That isn't good enough for you. He didn't specifically denounce the violence, so you claim he approves of it.

Tell us, what exact verbiage must all the Christians state in order to satisfy you?
Some people are angry at Christians for voting for Trump because some racist scumbags also voted for Trump. These people figure therefore, that the Christians are responsible for the bad acts of the scumbags.

And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers' money, and overthrew the tables;
-- John 2:15​

Perhaps....I don't know anyone who thinks as you've described. Admittedly, between Friday and today, I've only had conversations with about 50-60 people, and even were I to have discussed the matter with every person I know, that still wouldn't amount to a notable share of the U.S. population.

Even I who detest Trump more than anyone I've ever disliked doesn't think that. It's absurd to think that, wearing their "Christian hat," most Christians voted for Trump because "racist scumbags" also voted for Trump. What's far more rational is recognizing that "racist scumbags" happen to self-identify as Christians and that white Christian leaders may be fearful of risking sources of funding by denouncing them. That latter reason is a good reason to be angry at Christian leaders.

Jesus went into the temple courtyard and threw out everyone who was buying and selling there. He overturned the moneychangers’ tables and the chairs of those who sold pigeons. He told them, “Scripture says, ‘My house will be called a house of prayer,’ but you’re turning it into a gathering place for thieves!” Blind and lame people came to him in the temple courtyard, and he healed them. When the chief priests and the experts in Moses’ Teachings saw the amazing miracles he performed and the children shouting in the temple courtyard, “Hosanna to the Son of David!” they were irritated. They said to him, “Do you hear what these children are saying?” Jesus replied, “Yes, I do. Have you never read, ‘From the mouths of little children and infants, you have created praise’?” He left them and went out of the city to Bethany and spent the night there.
-- Matthew 21:12-17
[



What was the point of the quote? It's completely out of place.
 

Crixus

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Okay look at it like this, say ol'Franklen jumped out with everyone else to state how NOT racist they are. Wouldn't it have done any good? Would he have peen praised in the press Or parodied on late night TV? Flip It around to a democrat and one of their issues. Would you expect a died in the whool 2nd supporter to buy it if Chucky Schumer said he was pro 2nd? There is no winning. Nothing can be said that the other side will accept, not even surrender. Face it, there will always be a bad thing to speak out against and I hope we are never judged for not considering every single one in every action I take.
 

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