Federal judge in Texas strikes down U.S. COVID-19 eviction moratorium

night_son

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Link to the news article:

Federal judge in Texas strikes down U.S. COVID-19 eviction moratorium

From the news article:


"(Reuters) - A federal judge in Texas on Thursday ruled unconstitutional a national moratorium the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has instituted for most residential evictions to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Siding with a group of landlords and property owners challenging the evictions freeze, U.S. District Judge J. Campbell Barker in Tyler, Texas, ruled the CDC exceeded its authority under the interstate commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution."


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OP commentary:

Perhaps John Steinbeck's seminal novel about the Great Depression is poised to become a non-fiction survival handbook for our times. The Grapes of Wrath, anyone? Buckle up Buttercups . . .

I am of a split mind on this subject. On one hand my family—generationally—has prided itself on the self-sufficiency of its adult men and women, no more so than in times of great upheaval. During the Great Depression my great grandfather, who owned several hundred acres of northern Baltimore County field and forest, planted his own gardens, raised his own livestock and worked whatever odd jobs he could find, all in order to provide for his family. He even bartered with neighbors—labor and goods for food and cash. His wife, my great grandmother, would hop a train every morning and ride it to a small Pennsylvania town to work in a then newly opened plastics injection molding factory. They survived and even thrived during the Great Depression only because they were willing to put forth an endless effort backed by a collective indominable will to succeed. My great grandfather taught himself to repair shoes, cut hair, forge tools and make ax and pick handles. Amazing ingenuity.

In light of the above, and on the other hand, I do feel pity for those Americans who lost their livelihoods to COVID restrictions, but landlords have to feed their families as well, no?
 

Concerned American

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Link to the news article:

Federal judge in Texas strikes down U.S. COVID-19 eviction moratorium

From the news article:


"(Reuters) - A federal judge in Texas on Thursday ruled unconstitutional a national moratorium the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has instituted for most residential evictions to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Siding with a group of landlords and property owners challenging the evictions freeze, U.S. District Judge J. Campbell Barker in Tyler, Texas, ruled the CDC exceeded its authority under the interstate commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution."


Bonus video about the article:



OP commentary:

Perhaps John Steinbeck's seminal novel about the Great Depression is poised to become a non-fiction survival handbook for our times. The Grapes of Wrath, anyone? Buckle up Buttercups . . .

I am of a split mind on this subject. On one hand my family—generationally—has prided itself on the self-sufficiency of its adult men and women, no more so than in times of great upheaval. During the Great Depression my great grandfather, who owned several hundred acres of northern Baltimore County field and forest, planted his own gardens, raised his own livestock and worked whatever odd jobs he could find, all in order to provide for his family. He even bartered with Ineighbors—labor and goods for food and cash. His wife, my great grandmother, would hop a train every morning and ride it to a small Pennsylvania town to work in a then newly opened plastics injection molding factory. They survived and even thrived during the Great Depression only because they were willing to put forth an endless effort backed by a collective indominable will to succeed. My great grandfather taught himself to repair shoes, cut hair, forge tools and make ax and pick handles. Amazing ingenuity.

In light of the above, and on the other hand, I do feel pity for those Americans who lost their livelihoods to COVID restrictions, but landlords have to feed their families as well, no?
It is another example of communist wealth redistribution. The landlords' money that pays the mortgage is redistributed indirectly to the deadbeat tenant that cannot be evicted.
 

task0778

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I don't think a federal agency like the CDC should be making this kind of law, that is what Congress is for. That said, this kind of thing needs to be a state and local level decision, peculiar to the circumstances in that state or locality. I think the federal gov't assumes too much power and authority that the Constitution says they don't actually have.
 

BlindBoo

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Link to the news article:

Federal judge in Texas strikes down U.S. COVID-19 eviction moratorium

From the news article:


"(Reuters) - A federal judge in Texas on Thursday ruled unconstitutional a national moratorium the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has instituted for most residential evictions to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Siding with a group of landlords and property owners challenging the evictions freeze, U.S. District Judge J. Campbell Barker in Tyler, Texas, ruled the CDC exceeded its authority under the interstate commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution."


Bonus video about the article:



OP commentary:

Perhaps John Steinbeck's seminal novel about the Great Depression is poised to become a non-fiction survival handbook for our times. The Grapes of Wrath, anyone? Buckle up Buttercups . . .

I am of a split mind on this subject. On one hand my family—generationally—has prided itself on the self-sufficiency of its adult men and women, no more so than in times of great upheaval. During the Great Depression my great grandfather, who owned several hundred acres of northern Baltimore County field and forest, planted his own gardens, raised his own livestock and worked whatever odd jobs he could find, all in order to provide for his family. He even bartered with Ineighbors—labor and goods for food and cash. His wife, my great grandmother, would hop a train every morning and ride it to a small Pennsylvania town to work in a then newly opened plastics injection molding factory. They survived and even thrived during the Great Depression only because they were willing to put forth an endless effort backed by a collective indominable will to succeed. My great grandfather taught himself to repair shoes, cut hair, forge tools and make ax and pick handles. Amazing ingenuity.

In light of the above, and on the other hand, I do feel pity for those Americans who lost their livelihoods to COVID restrictions, but landlords have to feed their families as well, no?
It is another example of communist wealth redistribution. The landlords' money that pays the mortgage is redistributed indirectly to the deadbeat tenant that cannot be evicted.
So the Trump administration was a champion of communist Wealth redistribution? Man, I'm learning new stuff on here all the time.

"Barker said he expected the CDC to abide by his ruling and cease enforcement of the CDC’s moratorium order, imposed in September under the Trump administration and extended on Jan. 21, the day after President Joe Biden took office, to run at least another two months."

Damn Commies have taken over if they have ol' Trumpybear.
 

WEATHER53

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Simply put it us an undue taking of property
Owners have legal title and nowhere is that legal title subjugated by the CDC
Just finished up an apartment building sale in DC and the owner really doesn’t own the building according to DC “law” , the deadbeat tenants do with all these stalling techniques they can use. DC is so out of line with their capitalism hating deadbeat tenant loving. Really they have interjected themselves into the owners “free and unalienable title” and I am most happy to see a federal judge begin pushing the needle back to sanity and respect for property owners rights instead of nannyism for tenants.
 

Obiwan

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Link to the news article:

Federal judge in Texas strikes down U.S. COVID-19 eviction moratorium

From the news article:


"(Reuters) - A federal judge in Texas on Thursday ruled unconstitutional a national moratorium the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has instituted for most residential evictions to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Siding with a group of landlords and property owners challenging the evictions freeze, U.S. District Judge J. Campbell Barker in Tyler, Texas, ruled the CDC exceeded its authority under the interstate commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution."


Bonus video about the article:



OP commentary:

Perhaps John Steinbeck's seminal novel about the Great Depression is poised to become a non-fiction survival handbook for our times. The Grapes of Wrath, anyone? Buckle up Buttercups . . .

I am of a split mind on this subject. On one hand my family—generationally—has prided itself on the self-sufficiency of its adult men and women, no more so than in times of great upheaval. During the Great Depression my great grandfather, who owned several hundred acres of northern Baltimore County field and forest, planted his own gardens, raised his own livestock and worked whatever odd jobs he could find, all in order to provide for his family. He even bartered with neighbors—labor and goods for food and cash. His wife, my great grandmother, would hop a train every morning and ride it to a small Pennsylvania town to work in a then newly opened plastics injection molding factory. They survived and even thrived during the Great Depression only because they were willing to put forth an endless effort backed by a collective indominable will to succeed. My great grandfather taught himself to repair shoes, cut hair, forge tools and make ax and pick handles. Amazing ingenuity.

In light of the above, and on the other hand, I do feel pity for those Americans who lost their livelihoods to COVID restrictions, but landlords have to feed their families as well, no?
If the CDC wanted the tenants to be able to skip paying rent, then at a minimum, the government should have been held responsible for the property taxes and mortgage payments (along with anything else that might be included in the rent, such as utilities) that the landlord was responsible for....

Then Congress should have granted stimulus relief to the landlords for loss of income due to the restrictions, since they were running a business that was impacted by the virus....
 

theHawk

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How are we going to get back to normal if we don't collect rent?
Well, it’s called “the new normal”, where you never really get back your rights. Just go with it.
 

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