Do you consider western europe as a extension of america?

GLASNOST

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I've traveled a lot, never noticed any special anti-American antagonism, except in Paris and California, and parts of NYC.
Americans have nothing to feel ashamed about there. The French (particularly Parisians) don't like anyone and they think ridiculing others makes them feel better about themselves. They mock everyone no matter where they come from ... even the French from the countryside get abused.
 

Toffeenut Baconsmuggler

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I've heard some good stories from people who have travelled overseas, but the bad stories out number the good ones...
This is good news, considering the behaviour and pre-conceptions most Americans have who come over here.

I've always wanted to go to Scotland, for several reasons.
But that will never happen, as I don't fly on public planes and I do not like being on boats or ships.

On the flipside here..........I've met people from Russia, Mexico, Venezuela, Japan, South Africa, India, and England. I have to say they were very nice people, and only had nice things to say about their travels. I love meeting people from other parts of the globe, because I like to pick their brains on what they like in other countries versus the country they are from. It's fun to learn stuff like that.
 

GLASNOST

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"The Prince-Elector of Hanover became George I of Great Britain – despite barely being able to speak English. It’s fair to say many in Blighty were less than impressed by the idea of some obscure aristocrat from a continental backwater putting his backside down on the throne. At his coronation, spectators called out 'Down with the German!', and many dismissed him as a country bumpkin, even dubbing him the 'Turnip King'. The runaway xenophobia also led to his carnal appetites being lambasted – as one local gossip put it, the new king 'rejects no woman so long as she is very willing, very fat, and has great breasts'.

George’s heart lay in Hanover – a fact that became literal when he died and was buried in his homeland, the last British monarch laid to rest abroad. His son, George II, at least had the advantage of being able to speak English properly, but it took George III to really make an effort to be less flagrantly German. On becoming king, he famously declared that “Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Britain' – a conscious attempt to reassure everyone that he was over the whole Hanover thing.


A few monarchs later, it was the turn of Queen Victoria. Despite being an icon of Britishness to this very day, she was – by blood – just as German as her Hanoverian predecessors. Her first language was German, and she ended up having a legendarily passionate marriage with her German cousin, Albert."

Also ...


"On June 19, 1917, during the third year of World War I, Britain’s King George V orders the British royal family to dispense with the use of German titles and surnames, changing the surname of his own family, the decidedly Germanic Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, to Windsor.

The second son of Prince Edward of Wales (later King Edward VII) and Alexandra of Denmark, and the grandson of Queen Victoria, George was born in 1865 and embarked on a naval career before becoming heir to the throne in 1892 when his older brother, Edward, died of pneumonia. The following year, George married the German princess Mary of Teck (his cousin, a granddaughter of King George III), who had previously been intended for Edward. The couple had six children, including the future Edward VIII and George VI (who took the throne in 1936 after his brother abdicated to marry the American divorcee Wallis Simpson). As the new Duke of York, George was made to abandon his career in the navy; he became a member of the House of Lords and received a political education. When his father died in 1910, George ascended to the British throne as King George V.

With the outbreak of World War I in the summer of 1914, strong anti-German feeling within Britain caused sensitivity among the royal family about its German roots. Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, also a grandson of Queen Victoria, was the king’s cousin; the queen herself was German. As a result, on June 19, 1917, the king decreed that the royal surname was thereby changed from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor."
BY THE WAY: Lawrence Welk. "A-wonderful a-wonderful!"

* Welk was born in the German-speaking community of Strasburg, North Dakota.

* He was raised in a pocket of German immigrants in a remote area of North Dakota, a place so rural and isolated there was no need for anyone to learn English. Welk didn’t learn English until he went to school.
 

themirrorthief

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I've heard some good stories from people who have travelled overseas, but the bad stories out number the good ones...
This is good news, considering the behaviour and pre-conceptions most Americans have who come over here.

I've always wanted to go to Scotland, for several reasons.
But that will never happen, as I don't fly on public planes and I do not like being on boats or ships.

On the flipside here..........I've met people from Russia, Mexico, Venezuela, Japan, South Africa, India, and England. I have to say they were very nice people, and only had nice things to say about their travels. I love meeting people from other parts of the globe, because I like to pick their brains on what they like in other countries versus the country they are from. It's fun to learn stuff like that.
the usa is the final version of the roman empire...it will always be under attack from barbarians
 

GLASNOST

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I've always wanted to go to Scotland, for several reasons.
But that will never happen, as I don't fly on public planes and I do not like being on boats or ships.

On the flipside here..........I've met people from Russia, Mexico, Venezuela, Japan, South Africa, India, and England. I have to say they were very nice people, and only had nice things to say about their travels. I love meeting people from other parts of the globe, because I like to pick their brains on what they like in other countries versus the country they are from. It's fun to learn stuff like that.
Can I ask you the reason for not wanting to fly on public planes? It would be a pity for you not to travel "for several reasons".

I have been to nearly 100 countries, traveling overland for several years. People/countries, like/dislike. I've gained new prejudices and lost some that I had and my traveling experiences have afforded me a much greater education than anything else. So, what is preventing you from traveling abroad?
 

GLASNOST

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I've heard some good stories from people who have travelled overseas, but the bad stories out number the good ones...
This is good news, considering the behaviour and pre-conceptions most Americans have who come over here.

I've always wanted to go to Scotland, for several reasons.
But that will never happen, as I don't fly on public planes and I do not like being on boats or ships.

On the flipside here..........I've met people from Russia, Mexico, Venezuela, Japan, South Africa, India, and England. I have to say they were very nice people, and only had nice things to say about their travels. I love meeting people from other parts of the globe, because I like to pick their brains on what they like in other countries versus the country they are from. It's fun to learn stuff like that.
the usa is the final version of the roman empire...it will always be under attack from barbarians
First of all, the us is the latest empire but not "the final one".
Secondly, it was Roman corruption from within that caused its downfall, not "attacks from barbarians".

With regards the usa, it itself has become the barbarian that has caused the decline of democracy wherever it has managed to do so. It's demise, therefore, will be from either corruption (and revolution) or by an invasion of civilized and Democracy-loving nations.
 

DudleySmith

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I've traveled a lot, never noticed any special anti-American antagonism, except in Paris and California, and parts of NYC.
Americans have nothing to feel ashamed about there. The French (particularly Parisians) don't like anyone and they think ridiculing others makes them feel better about themselves. They mock everyone no matter where they come from ... even the French from the countryside get abused.

Yes. I almost never run into it in the south, where people are very nice and helpful and have senses of humor.
 

GLASNOST

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I've traveled a lot, never noticed any special anti-American antagonism, except in Paris and California, and parts of NYC.
Americans have nothing to feel ashamed about there. The French (particularly Parisians) don't like anyone and they think ridiculing others makes them feel better about themselves. They mock everyone no matter where they come from ... even the French from the countryside get abused.

Yes. I almost never run into it in the south, where people are very nice and helpful and have senses of humor.
I love the towns of France but the cities ...... forget about it.
 

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