What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Did Bill Clinton lose America's nuclear launch codes?

excalibur

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2015
Messages
10,006
Reaction score
18,516
Points
2,290
Just a reminder for all you tinfoil hat leftoids. Yes, there are two sets of rules, one for Democrats and one for Republicans.


What happened?
A new memoir by General Hugh Shelton, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says that in 2000, an aide to President Clinton once misplaced a crucial series of codes for accessing the country's nuclear arsenal and managed to hide the mistake for "months." Specifically, Shelton claims the aide lost the "biscuit" — a code name for the notecard used to open the black attache case, known as "the football." The suitcase holds "nuclear codes which the US president would use to authorise the launch of nuclear weapons," and Shelton says that losing them is "a big deal—a gargantuan deal." (Watch an ABC report about the controversy)​
How could something like that simply get lost?
Although the "movies may show the president wearing these codes around his neck, it's pretty standard that they are safeguarded by one of his aides," writes Shelton. "But that aide sticks with him like glue." There is also a military protocol for checking on the codes, but the Clinton aide seemed to talk his (or her) way around those standard inspections.​
How was the situation resolved?
When it was time to replace the old codes with new ones, the aide finally confessed what happened, and the president was immediately issued a new "biscuit." Whether the aide suffered repercussions for misplacing the codes is not clear.​
What would have happened if the codes had fallen into the wrong hands?
The world was probably not in imminent danger. Former Homeland Security advisor Fran Townsend tells CNN that, even if an unathorized person got ahold of the codes, "it is very unlikely that they could execute a launch, because the "biscuit" is "only one part of the launch protocol." Actually launching a nuclear strike involves a "multi-layered system" that includes the aforementioned "football."​
Did Clinton know about the problem?
Probably not. The president "assumed, I'm sure," writes Shelton, "that the aide had them like he was supposed to."​
Is this really the first anyone's heard of this?
Sort of. Seven years ago, Robert "Buzz" Patterson, who served as a military advisor to Clinton, wrote an anti-Clinton polemic "Derelection of Duty," which detailed his own experience with lost nuclear codes. Speaking to Accuracy in Media, Patterson recalls that, at one point, "I asked President Clinton to produce the codes so I could swap the codes out with new codes," and the president "confessed that he'd misplaced" them, thereby really violat[ing] military protocol." But in Patterson's version of events Clinton made his error in 1998, as the Monica Lewinsky scandal was breaking. ("Maybe he lost them twice.," says a retired Air Force colonel who carried the "football" during the Clinton administration.)​
Has this happened to other presidents?
According to ABC News, there's an "old story that Jimmy Carter left his biscuit in a suit that got sent to the dry cleaners" — mysteriously, "no one will confirm the story, but no one will deny it either."​


 
Last edited:

White 6

Diamond Member
Staff member
Moderator
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2019
Messages
27,320
Reaction score
15,772
Points
1,290
Just a reminder for all you tinfoil hat leftoids. Yes, there are two sets of rules, one for Democrats and one for Republicans.


What happened?
A new memoir by General Hugh Shelton, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says that in 2000, an aide to President Clinton once misplaced a crucial series of codes for accessing the country's nuclear arsenal and managed to hide the mistake for "months." Specifically, Shelton claims the aide lost the "biscuit" — a code name for the notecard used to open the black attache case, known as "the football." The suitcase holds "nuclear codes which the US president would use to authorise the launch of nuclear weapons," and Shelton says that losing them is "a big deal—a gargantuan deal." (Watch an ABC report about the controversy)​
How could something like that simply get lost?
Although the "movies may show the president wearing these codes around his neck, it's pretty standard that they are safeguarded by one of his aides," writes Shelton. "But that aide sticks with him like glue." There is also a military protocol for checking on the codes, but the Clinton aide seemed to talk his (or her) way around those standard inspections.​
How was the situation resolved?
When it was time to replace the old codes with new ones, the aide finally confessed what happened, and the president was immediately issued a new "biscuit." Whether the aide suffered repercussions for misplacing the codes is not clear.​
What would have happened if the codes had fallen into the wrong hands?
The world was probably not in imminent danger. Former Homeland Security advisor Fran Townsend tells CNN that, even if an unathorized person got ahold of the codes, "it is very unlikely that they could execute a launch, because the "biscuit" is "only one part of the launch protocol." Actually launching a nuclear strike involves a "multi-layered system" that includes the aforementioned "football."​
Did Clinton know about the problem?
Probably not. The president "assumed, I'm sure," writes Shelton, "that the aide had them like he was supposed to."​
Is this really the first anyone's heard of this?
Sort of. Seven years ago, Robert "Buzz" Patterson, who served as a military advisor to Clinton, wrote an anti-Clinton polemic "Derelection of Duty," which detailed his own experience with lost nuclear codes. Speaking to Accuracy in Media, Patterson recalls that, at one point, "I asked President Clinton to produce the codes so I could swap the codes out with new codes," and the president "confessed that he'd misplaced" them, thereby really violat[ing] military protocol." But in Patterson's version of events Clinton made his error in 1998, as the Monica Lewinsky scandal was breaking. ("Maybe he lost them twice.," says a retired Air Force colonel who carried the "football" during the Clinton administration.)​
Has this happened to other presidents?
According to ABC News, there's an "old story that Jimmy Carter left his biscuit in a suit that got sent to the dry cleaners" — mysteriously, "no one will confirm the story, but no one will deny it either."​


Interesting. I never heard of it.
 
OP
excalibur

excalibur

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2015
Messages
10,006
Reaction score
18,516
Points
2,290

otto105

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2017
Messages
19,751
Reaction score
5,291
Points
170
Just a reminder for all you tinfoil hat leftoids. Yes, there are two sets of rules, one for Democrats and one for Republicans.


What happened?
A new memoir by General Hugh Shelton, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says that in 2000, an aide to President Clinton once misplaced a crucial series of codes for accessing the country's nuclear arsenal and managed to hide the mistake for "months." Specifically, Shelton claims the aide lost the "biscuit" — a code name for the notecard used to open the black attache case, known as "the football." The suitcase holds "nuclear codes which the US president would use to authorise the launch of nuclear weapons," and Shelton says that losing them is "a big deal—a gargantuan deal." (Watch an ABC report about the controversy)​
How could something like that simply get lost?
Although the "movies may show the president wearing these codes around his neck, it's pretty standard that they are safeguarded by one of his aides," writes Shelton. "But that aide sticks with him like glue." There is also a military protocol for checking on the codes, but the Clinton aide seemed to talk his (or her) way around those standard inspections.​
How was the situation resolved?
When it was time to replace the old codes with new ones, the aide finally confessed what happened, and the president was immediately issued a new "biscuit." Whether the aide suffered repercussions for misplacing the codes is not clear.​
What would have happened if the codes had fallen into the wrong hands?
The world was probably not in imminent danger. Former Homeland Security advisor Fran Townsend tells CNN that, even if an unathorized person got ahold of the codes, "it is very unlikely that they could execute a launch, because the "biscuit" is "only one part of the launch protocol." Actually launching a nuclear strike involves a "multi-layered system" that includes the aforementioned "football."​
Did Clinton know about the problem?
Probably not. The president "assumed, I'm sure," writes Shelton, "that the aide had them like he was supposed to."​
Is this really the first anyone's heard of this?
Sort of. Seven years ago, Robert "Buzz" Patterson, who served as a military advisor to Clinton, wrote an anti-Clinton polemic "Derelection of Duty," which detailed his own experience with lost nuclear codes. Speaking to Accuracy in Media, Patterson recalls that, at one point, "I asked President Clinton to produce the codes so I could swap the codes out with new codes," and the president "confessed that he'd misplaced" them, thereby really violat[ing] military protocol." But in Patterson's version of events Clinton made his error in 1998, as the Monica Lewinsky scandal was breaking. ("Maybe he lost them twice.," says a retired Air Force colonel who carried the "football" during the Clinton administration.)​
Has this happened to other presidents?
According to ABC News, there's an "old story that Jimmy Carter left his biscuit in a suit that got sent to the dry cleaners" — mysteriously, "no one will confirm the story, but no one will deny it either."​


Wow, digging pretty far back to play the whataboutism card.

Under what rock in the wingnut noise machine did this come from?
 
OP
excalibur

excalibur

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2015
Messages
10,006
Reaction score
18,516
Points
2,290
Interesting. I never heard of it.


Of course, the MSM made sure the stories died.

Recall that if it wasn't for Drudge finding out and going public the MSM was covering up the Monica Lewinsky story.
 
OP
excalibur

excalibur

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2015
Messages
10,006
Reaction score
18,516
Points
2,290
Wow, digging pretty far back to play the whataboutism card.

Under what rock in the wingnut noise machine did this come from?


It isn't whataboutism, derp.
 

White 6

Diamond Member
Staff member
Moderator
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2019
Messages
27,320
Reaction score
15,772
Points
1,290
Of course, the MSM made sure the stories died.

Recall that if it wasn't for Drudge finding out and going public the MSM was covering up the Monica Lewinsky story.
They were a little more timely than the story you posted, though I found it fascinating. Excalibur, you would truly be amazed what never has, nor never will make it to mainstream or even non-mainstream knowledge or media.
 

konradv

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
34,028
Reaction score
8,519
Points
1,330
Location
Baltimore adjacent
Just a reminder for all you tinfoil hat leftoids. Yes, there are two sets of rules, one for Democrats and one for Republicans.


What happened?
A new memoir by General Hugh Shelton, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says that in 2000, an aide to President Clinton once misplaced a crucial series of codes for accessing the country's nuclear arsenal and managed to hide the mistake for "months." Specifically, Shelton claims the aide lost the "biscuit" — a code name for the notecard used to open the black attache case, known as "the football." The suitcase holds "nuclear codes which the US president would use to authorise the launch of nuclear weapons," and Shelton says that losing them is "a big deal—a gargantuan deal." (Watch an ABC report about the controversy)​
How could something like that simply get lost?
Although the "movies may show the president wearing these codes around his neck, it's pretty standard that they are safeguarded by one of his aides," writes Shelton. "But that aide sticks with him like glue." There is also a military protocol for checking on the codes, but the Clinton aide seemed to talk his (or her) way around those standard inspections.​
How was the situation resolved?
When it was time to replace the old codes with new ones, the aide finally confessed what happened, and the president was immediately issued a new "biscuit." Whether the aide suffered repercussions for misplacing the codes is not clear.​
What would have happened if the codes had fallen into the wrong hands?
The world was probably not in imminent danger. Former Homeland Security advisor Fran Townsend tells CNN that, even if an unathorized person got ahold of the codes, "it is very unlikely that they could execute a launch, because the "biscuit" is "only one part of the launch protocol." Actually launching a nuclear strike involves a "multi-layered system" that includes the aforementioned "football."​
Did Clinton know about the problem?
Probably not. The president "assumed, I'm sure," writes Shelton, "that the aide had them like he was supposed to."​
Is this really the first anyone's heard of this?
Sort of. Seven years ago, Robert "Buzz" Patterson, who served as a military advisor to Clinton, wrote an anti-Clinton polemic "Derelection of Duty," which detailed his own experience with lost nuclear codes. Speaking to Accuracy in Media, Patterson recalls that, at one point, "I asked President Clinton to produce the codes so I could swap the codes out with new codes," and the president "confessed that he'd misplaced" them, thereby really violat[ing] military protocol." But in Patterson's version of events Clinton made his error in 1998, as the Monica Lewinsky scandal was breaking. ("Maybe he lost them twice.," says a retired Air Force colonel who carried the "football" during the Clinton administration.)​
Has this happened to other presidents?
According to ABC News, there's an "old story that Jimmy Carter left his biscuit in a suit that got sent to the dry cleaners" — mysteriously, "no one will confirm the story, but no one will deny it either."​


Current Events?
 

mamooth

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2012
Messages
27,998
Reaction score
10,090
Points
910
Location
Indianapolis, Indiana
It isn't whataboutism, derp.
It actually falls more into the category of "lying."

You claim that since a military aide -- a non-political person -- made some mistake, it reflects badly on democrats.

You're not that stupid, so the logical conclusion is deliberate dishonesty on your part.
 

struth

Diamond Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Messages
25,853
Reaction score
15,563
Points
1,288
Clinton did give the CCP nuclear weapon tech.

That was back when the CCP first took ownership of the demafascist party with massive illegal donations. It’s only gotten worse
 

konradv

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
34,028
Reaction score
8,519
Points
1,330
Location
Baltimore adjacent
Clinton did give the CCP nuclear weapon tech.

That was back when the CCP first took ownership of the demafascist party with massive illegal donations. It’s only gotten worse
Current Events?
 

otto105

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2017
Messages
19,751
Reaction score
5,291
Points
170
if i posted with a chinese accent would you have understood? silly dembot cultist..
No, you posted a racist 4chan post hoping other little bois would like.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$55.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top