Cuteness Alert! new kids, 7 hours old

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ozro

ozro

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My partner "saves" whethers. I can't think of anything more useless on a dairy farm. But he insists. I offer him some promising doelings every year and he tries to "save" the whethers. His five adult whethers are the most destructive bullies here. He doesn't bother to teach them to pack or pull carts, both acceptable whether occupations. They just break down their fences, ruin the hay, and rampage about as they please. This weekend, I am rebuilding their fences and installing electric fences to contain them. If this doesn't work, a .44 will. I'll just claim they broke out and ran off. No one wants to eat 5-8 yr old whethers.
i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
 

gallantwarrior

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My partner "saves" whethers. I can't think of anything more useless on a dairy farm. But he insists. I offer him some promising doelings every year and he tries to "save" the whethers. His five adult whethers are the most destructive bullies here. He doesn't bother to teach them to pack or pull carts, both acceptable whether occupations. They just break down their fences, ruin the hay, and rampage about as they please. This weekend, I am rebuilding their fences and installing electric fences to contain them. If this doesn't work, a .44 will. I'll just claim they broke out and ran off. No one wants to eat 5-8 yr old whethers.
i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
 
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ozro

ozro

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My partner "saves" whethers. I can't think of anything more useless on a dairy farm. But he insists. I offer him some promising doelings every year and he tries to "save" the whethers. His five adult whethers are the most destructive bullies here. He doesn't bother to teach them to pack or pull carts, both acceptable whether occupations. They just break down their fences, ruin the hay, and rampage about as they please. This weekend, I am rebuilding their fences and installing electric fences to contain them. If this doesn't work, a .44 will. I'll just claim they broke out and ran off. No one wants to eat 5-8 yr old whethers.
i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
 

gallantwarrior

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My partner "saves" whethers. I can't think of anything more useless on a dairy farm. But he insists. I offer him some promising doelings every year and he tries to "save" the whethers. His five adult whethers are the most destructive bullies here. He doesn't bother to teach them to pack or pull carts, both acceptable whether occupations. They just break down their fences, ruin the hay, and rampage about as they please. This weekend, I am rebuilding their fences and installing electric fences to contain them. If this doesn't work, a .44 will. I'll just claim they broke out and ran off. No one wants to eat 5-8 yr old whethers.
i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Funny. I was researching mules when I came across llamas. I ran a packing/hiking/camping business with my team for a while. I also had three alpacas but the seemed frail. I discovered goats and liked them so much more than llamas. When my llama herd succumbed to a situation here, I switched to goats. Mules are super cool, though, and I hope to maybe acquire one someday. They aren't that expensive here, but they are hard to come by locally. In reality, I'd like to build a vardo, get a Gypsy Vanner and see how a camping enterprise might fare here.
 
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ozro

ozro

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My partner "saves" whethers. I can't think of anything more useless on a dairy farm. But he insists. I offer him some promising doelings every year and he tries to "save" the whethers. His five adult whethers are the most destructive bullies here. He doesn't bother to teach them to pack or pull carts, both acceptable whether occupations. They just break down their fences, ruin the hay, and rampage about as they please. This weekend, I am rebuilding their fences and installing electric fences to contain them. If this doesn't work, a .44 will. I'll just claim they broke out and ran off. No one wants to eat 5-8 yr old whethers.
i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Funny. I was researching mules when I came across llamas. I ran a packing/hiking/camping business with my team for a while. I also had three alpacas but the seemed frail. I discovered goats and liked them so much more than llamas. When my llama herd succumbed to a situation here, I switched to goats. Mules are super cool, though, and I hope to maybe acquire one someday. They aren't that expensive here, but they are hard to come by locally. In reality, I'd like to build a vardo, get a Gypsy Vanner and see how a camping enterprise might fare here.
i saw a matched team of jacks sell for 3300 and a saddle jenny sell for 1100 at an auction in gallup nm two weeks ago. a six month old jack went for 700.
at the same auction, ranch horses were going for 500 to 700.
mules are expensive
I bet you could do a camping/hunting trip business and make out well
 

gallantwarrior

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My partner "saves" whethers. I can't think of anything more useless on a dairy farm. But he insists. I offer him some promising doelings every year and he tries to "save" the whethers. His five adult whethers are the most destructive bullies here. He doesn't bother to teach them to pack or pull carts, both acceptable whether occupations. They just break down their fences, ruin the hay, and rampage about as they please. This weekend, I am rebuilding their fences and installing electric fences to contain them. If this doesn't work, a .44 will. I'll just claim they broke out and ran off. No one wants to eat 5-8 yr old whethers.
i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Wow! Those prices are cheap compared to the prices here. Even owning equine stock is expensive. Brome or timothy goes for $12 to $15 a bale. And that's the local stuff. Alfalfa won't even grow here unless you dump tons of lime on the soil. We have very acidic soils here, great for blueberries but it sucks for hay. I'd like to get some breeding Scottish Highland cattle. They do well here and grass-fed beef is very marketable. Some people make a bit of money selling yak meat, too. Anything up here has to be winter hardy, of course. I was surprised at how well my free-range chickens and turkeys did last winter. The goats do well, except for the previously noted ears.
 
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ozro

ozro

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i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Wow! Those prices are cheap compared to the prices here. Even owning equine stock is expensive. Brome or timothy goes for $12 to $15 a bale. And that's the local stuff. Alfalfa won't even grow here unless you dump tons of lime on the soil. We have very acidic soils here, great for blueberries but it sucks for hay. I'd like to get some breeding Scottish Highland cattle. They do well here and grass-fed beef is very marketable. Some people make a bit of money selling yak meat, too. Anything up here has to be winter hardy, of course. I was surprised at how well my free-range chickens and turkeys did last winter. The goats do well, except for the previously noted ears.
hay is 2 to 15 for a 3 string bale at the feed store here. I go to Cortez, co twice a year a pull back a 18wheeler flatbed full, so i dont pay that.
 
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ozro

ozro

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i usually trade or butcher the whethers, but i keep at least 3 billies around for protection. i have acerage, with range rights. there are fences around the perimeter of the range. they come home at night but free range during the day.
the sheep i have a share in are on a range two ranges north, and always free range. the sheep (navajo churro)are never butchered. they are too rare, so someone will always trade for them. they give the wool that is spun into yarn to make navajo weavings.
Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Wow! Those prices are cheap compared to the prices here. Even owning equine stock is expensive. Brome or timothy goes for $12 to $15 a bale. And that's the local stuff. Alfalfa won't even grow here unless you dump tons of lime on the soil. We have very acidic soils here, great for blueberries but it sucks for hay. I'd like to get some breeding Scottish Highland cattle. They do well here and grass-fed beef is very marketable. Some people make a bit of money selling yak meat, too. Anything up here has to be winter hardy, of course. I was surprised at how well my free-range chickens and turkeys did last winter. The goats do well, except for the previously noted ears.
you really think those are fair prices?
you won't be the first to tell me i am being too cheap
 

gallantwarrior

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Nice. I've seen articles and pictures of Navajo churros. I hope that as soon as I am developed enough I can bring in some Angoras. My partner might be satisfied raising them because the whethers actually provide the best mohair. I'm not sure that churros would do so well in this climate. I do keep heritage breed turkeys. I have a breeding pair of Spanish Blacks and two Narragansett hens. I'll be looking for a Narragansett tom this year. I'm also looking for some Chanticleer chickens.
I do love my goats, though. I had llamas before the goats and am glad that I switched. Llamas are buttholes.
I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Wow! Those prices are cheap compared to the prices here. Even owning equine stock is expensive. Brome or timothy goes for $12 to $15 a bale. And that's the local stuff. Alfalfa won't even grow here unless you dump tons of lime on the soil. We have very acidic soils here, great for blueberries but it sucks for hay. I'd like to get some breeding Scottish Highland cattle. They do well here and grass-fed beef is very marketable. Some people make a bit of money selling yak meat, too. Anything up here has to be winter hardy, of course. I was surprised at how well my free-range chickens and turkeys did last winter. The goats do well, except for the previously noted ears.
you really think those are fair prices?
you won't be the first to tell me i am being too cheap
Maybe not fair where you are but in Alaska mules, or horses, are few and far between because it is so expensive to own one. I did take care of a friend's Arabians for a while. One stallion, three mares and a yearling. The stallion was a hoot, the mares were brood horses, and that yearling was a terror. The stallion was #1 in state but eventually the owner moved South because Alaska is a relatively closed competition and moving animals from here to there and back is expensive. Probably lots of reasons why I don't have equine stock yet. Plus, as age advances I find myself less able to deal with larger livestock.
 
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ozro

ozro

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I heard about llamas, alpacas as well.
I want a team of mules but am flabbergasted by the prices of mules
Wow! Those prices are cheap compared to the prices here. Even owning equine stock is expensive. Brome or timothy goes for $12 to $15 a bale. And that's the local stuff. Alfalfa won't even grow here unless you dump tons of lime on the soil. We have very acidic soils here, great for blueberries but it sucks for hay. I'd like to get some breeding Scottish Highland cattle. They do well here and grass-fed beef is very marketable. Some people make a bit of money selling yak meat, too. Anything up here has to be winter hardy, of course. I was surprised at how well my free-range chickens and turkeys did last winter. The goats do well, except for the previously noted ears.
you really think those are fair prices?
you won't be the first to tell me i am being too cheap
Maybe not fair where you are but in Alaska mules, or horses, are few and far between because it is so expensive to own one. I did take care of a friend's Arabians for a while. One stallion, three mares and a yearling. The stallion was a hoot, the mares were brood horses, and that yearling was a terror. The stallion was #1 in state but eventually the owner moved South because Alaska is a relatively closed competition and moving animals from here to there and back is expensive. Probably lots of reasons why I don't have equine stock yet. Plus, as age advances I find myself less able to deal with larger livestock.
I have 3 horses, 2 mares and a gelding. just plain ranch horses. my knees have gotten so bad i dont enjoy riding anymore but i built a buckboard type wagon and pony one horse, so they all get worked. I inherited my grandfathers mule when he passed and have wanted another one ever since.
i rent myself and my ponies out to a few different guides i know when they have rich folks pay for a hunt. I would love to have a chuckwagon and a team of mules to rent out that way.
 

Luddly Neddite

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Goats are just plain cute but they're not your pets.

When I was a kid and now, as a vegetarian for, yikes, 40-ish years, no way would I ever confuse the two.
 
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ozro

ozro

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Goats are just plain cute but they're not your pets.

When I was a kid and now, as a vegetarian for, yikes, 40-ish years, no way would I ever confuse the two.
tell them that. they beg for treats, demand petting, learn tricks for treats and remember people
 

gallantwarrior

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Wow! Those prices are cheap compared to the prices here. Even owning equine stock is expensive. Brome or timothy goes for $12 to $15 a bale. And that's the local stuff. Alfalfa won't even grow here unless you dump tons of lime on the soil. We have very acidic soils here, great for blueberries but it sucks for hay. I'd like to get some breeding Scottish Highland cattle. They do well here and grass-fed beef is very marketable. Some people make a bit of money selling yak meat, too. Anything up here has to be winter hardy, of course. I was surprised at how well my free-range chickens and turkeys did last winter. The goats do well, except for the previously noted ears.
you really think those are fair prices?
you won't be the first to tell me i am being too cheap
Maybe not fair where you are but in Alaska mules, or horses, are few and far between because it is so expensive to own one. I did take care of a friend's Arabians for a while. One stallion, three mares and a yearling. The stallion was a hoot, the mares were brood horses, and that yearling was a terror. The stallion was #1 in state but eventually the owner moved South because Alaska is a relatively closed competition and moving animals from here to there and back is expensive. Probably lots of reasons why I don't have equine stock yet. Plus, as age advances I find myself less able to deal with larger livestock.
I have 3 horses, 2 mares and a gelding. just plain ranch horses. my knees have gotten so bad i dont enjoy riding anymore but i built a buckboard type wagon and pony one horse, so they all get worked. I inherited my grandfathers mule when he passed and have wanted another one ever since.
i rent myself and my ponies out to a few different guides i know when they have rich folks pay for a hunt. I would love to have a chuckwagon and a team of mules to rent out that way.
Oh, yeah. With me, it's the hips going out. I rode with a hunting guide in NM out of Lake Roberts a couple of years and learned to respect mules. They are loads smarter than horses, generally. The vardo and Vanner would give me the opportunity to provide unique camping opportunities and access from my place in Willow. In the winter, having a sled and horse would give people options for hayrides and sled rides. I'd just switch from riding to driving.
 

yowsa

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I saw no picture. This thread is a bit of a fraud.
 

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