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CDC Confirms Amoeba Killed Florida Teen

Ringel05

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Two days after a 16-year-old Florida girl died of an infection, officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that the culprit was a deadly amoeba, which is commonly found in lakes and rivers.

Health officials in Brevard County said they believe water infected with the parasite, known as a Naegleria fowleri, went up Courtney Nash’s nose while she was swimming in the St. Johns River in Mims, Fla., 44 miles east of Orlando, last week.

Once the amoeba enters the brain, it usually causes a fatal infection called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Initial signs of PAM include headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, loss of smell or taste and stiff neck. The disease spreads rapidly and usually results in death within three to seven days. It cannot be spread from person to person.
CDC Confirms Amoeba Killed Florida Teen - FoxNews.com
 

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A WAR ON 'MEEBERZ !
Careful. The fourth world can be a dangerous place.
Wash those veggies too !.
 

geauxtohell

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Two days after a 16-year-old Florida girl died of an infection, officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that the culprit was a deadly amoeba, which is commonly found in lakes and rivers.

Health officials in Brevard County said they believe water infected with the parasite, known as a Naegleria fowleri, went up Courtney Nash’s nose while she was swimming in the St. Johns River in Mims, Fla., 44 miles east of Orlando, last week.

Once the amoeba enters the brain, it usually causes a fatal infection called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Initial signs of PAM include headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, loss of smell or taste and stiff neck. The disease spreads rapidly and usually results in death within three to seven days. It cannot be spread from person to person.
CDC Confirms Amoeba Killed Florida Teen - FoxNews.com

Naegleria fowleri is a pretty severe pathogen that kills people every year. It's found in a lot of water sources, but it's very hard to catch. To get to the brain, it has to get through the cribiform plate, which is at the back of the nose. So to put yourself at risk, you have to do something like jump feet first into the water with sufficient momentum to let the amoeba get through your cribiform plate and the water that goes up your nose has to have the amoeba in it. So it's not easy to get it, but if you do, you are screwed. There really isn't anything that can be done.

Anyways, not sure if the article included that, but I thought I would.

It's not a new bug, just a rare one.
 
Last edited:

waltky

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The return of the brain eating amoeba...
:eek:
'Brain-eating amoeba' kills third person
8/17/2011 : Nine-year-old Va. boy dies after swimming in water infected by bug
A nine-year-old Virginia boy has died after swimming in water infected by a bug known as the "brain-eating amoeba," according to reports. It was the third such death this month. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported that Christian Alexander Strickland, 9, of Henrico County, became infected after he went to a fishing camp in the state.

The child died from meningitis Aug. 5 and Bonnie Strickland, his aunt, told the paper that Naegleria fowleri — or "brain-eating amoeba" as it is sometimes known — was a suspected cause of the illness. "The doctor described it to us as such a slight chance that they didn't even think it would be possible," Bonnie Strickland told the Times-Dispatch.

Health department officials told the paper they do not comment on individual cases. However, they confirmed a case of meningitis and an infection by the bug. "Sadly, we have had a Naegleria infection in Virginia this summer," Dr. Keri Hall, state epidemiologist at the Virginia Department of Health, in a statement, according to the Times-Dispatch. "It's important that people be aware of … safe swimming messages."

Naegleria fowleri moves into the body through the nose and destroys brain tissue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bug causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a nearly always fatal disease of the central nervous system, the CDC reported. Naegleria fowleri is usually found warm, stagnant water in freshwater lakes, ponds and rivers. It can also be found in wells.

No known treatment for infection
 

MeBelle

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Please be respectful and remember the families in their time of mourning.






*******Not insinuating that USMB members don't already do that of course!
 

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Brain Eating Parasite Found In Louisiana Tap Water Kills 2...
:eek:
Louisiana Issues Neti Pot Warning After Two Fatal Infections
Dec. 16, 2011 - Fatal infections have been linked to Neti pot usage. A Neti pot, pictured, is a sinus-flushing device.
The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has issued a warning about improper Neti pot use, which has been linked to two deadly infections. A 51-year-old woman from DeSoto Parish and a 20-year-old man from St. Bernard Parish, a suburb of New Orleans, died after using Neti pots containing tap water to flush their sinuses. Both became infected with Naegleria fowleri, a parasite known as the brain-eating amoeba. "If you are irrigating, flushing or rinsing your sinuses, for example, by using a Neti pot, use distilled, sterile or previously boiled water to make up the irrigation solution," Louisiana State epidemiologist Dr. Raoult Ratard said in a statement. "Tap water is safe for drinking but not for irrigating your nose."

Naegleria fowleri enters the body through the nose to cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis -- a brain infection with symptoms similar to those of bacterial meningitis. Headache, fever, nausea and stiff neck swiftly give way to confusion, loss of balance, seizures and hallucinations. And if left untreated, the infection can cause death within one to 12 days. "The difficulty is that Naegleria is exceedingly rare," said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "It's difficult to diagnose, and once it's diagnosed, it's also difficult to treat." Most Naegleria fowleri infections result from diving into warm, stagnant water. There were four deaths linked to the parasite last summer, including one in Louisiana. "I had not heard of Naegleria being associated with Neti pot use, but it's perfectly biologically plausible, because tap water is not sterile," said Schaffner. "And when you inhale it directly into the sinuses, it's similar to a deep dive into brackish water." Drinking tap water cannot cause a Naegleria fowleri infection.

The Neti pot is an ancient nasal irrigation system that looks like a gravy boat. When used properly, it can help relieve congestion associated with the common cold, the flu and allergies. "Particularly in the winter, a lot of people get chronic sinusitis and the Neti pot offers a way for the sinuses to drain," said Schaffner. "Some patients seem to benefit; other don't." Neti pot popularity has grown in recent years, thanks to celebrity backers like Oprah and Dr. Oz. But a 2009 study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual meeting suggests that Neti pot overuse could increase the risk of sinus infections.

"There's a degree of controversy about whether it should be recommended generally," said Schaffner. "It's one of those treatments that sort of grew up rather than coming to us through rigorous, evidence-based trials. But there are many people out there who swear by it." The warning from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals highlights the risks of improper Neti pot use. But when used and cleaned properly, the Neti pot is safe, Schaffner said. Use sterile, boiled [and cooled] or distilled water; rinse [the Neti pot] out thoroughly after use; and air-dry it," he said, adding that water left in the Neti pot after use could become a breeding ground for bacteria and parasites that feed on mucus. "You don't have to send it to an autoclave, but it does require some attention to detail."

Source
 

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I know what to do ! Enact a war on amoebas !
 

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Brain Eating Parasite Found In Louisiana Tap Water Kills 2...
:eek:
Louisiana Issues Neti Pot Warning After Two Fatal Infections
Dec. 16, 2011 - Fatal infections have been linked to Neti pot usage. A Neti pot, pictured, is a sinus-flushing device.
The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has issued a warning about improper Neti pot use, which has been linked to two deadly infections. A 51-year-old woman from DeSoto Parish and a 20-year-old man from St. Bernard Parish, a suburb of New Orleans, died after using Neti pots containing tap water to flush their sinuses. Both became infected with Naegleria fowleri, a parasite known as the brain-eating amoeba. "If you are irrigating, flushing or rinsing your sinuses, for example, by using a Neti pot, use distilled, sterile or previously boiled water to make up the irrigation solution," Louisiana State epidemiologist Dr. Raoult Ratard said in a statement. "Tap water is safe for drinking but not for irrigating your nose."

Naegleria fowleri enters the body through the nose to cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis -- a brain infection with symptoms similar to those of bacterial meningitis. Headache, fever, nausea and stiff neck swiftly give way to confusion, loss of balance, seizures and hallucinations. And if left untreated, the infection can cause death within one to 12 days. "The difficulty is that Naegleria is exceedingly rare," said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "It's difficult to diagnose, and once it's diagnosed, it's also difficult to treat." Most Naegleria fowleri infections result from diving into warm, stagnant water. There were four deaths linked to the parasite last summer, including one in Louisiana. "I had not heard of Naegleria being associated with Neti pot use, but it's perfectly biologically plausible, because tap water is not sterile," said Schaffner. "And when you inhale it directly into the sinuses, it's similar to a deep dive into brackish water." Drinking tap water cannot cause a Naegleria fowleri infection.

The Neti pot is an ancient nasal irrigation system that looks like a gravy boat. When used properly, it can help relieve congestion associated with the common cold, the flu and allergies. "Particularly in the winter, a lot of people get chronic sinusitis and the Neti pot offers a way for the sinuses to drain," said Schaffner. "Some patients seem to benefit; other don't." Neti pot popularity has grown in recent years, thanks to celebrity backers like Oprah and Dr. Oz. But a 2009 study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual meeting suggests that Neti pot overuse could increase the risk of sinus infections.

"There's a degree of controversy about whether it should be recommended generally," said Schaffner. "It's one of those treatments that sort of grew up rather than coming to us through rigorous, evidence-based trials. But there are many people out there who swear by it." The warning from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals highlights the risks of improper Neti pot use. But when used and cleaned properly, the Neti pot is safe, Schaffner said. Use sterile, boiled [and cooled] or distilled water; rinse [the Neti pot] out thoroughly after use; and air-dry it," he said, adding that water left in the Neti pot after use could become a breeding ground for bacteria and parasites that feed on mucus. "You don't have to send it to an autoclave, but it does require some attention to detail."

Source

WHAT?!

Isn't the rreal problem that the municiple water suppy is contaminated the REAL problem?

Blaming nedi pots is sort of silly.
 

strollingbones

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did ya see where them neti pots can introduce stuff into your brain

Neti pots
 

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Brain Eating Parasite Found In Louisiana Tap Water Kills 2...
:eek:
Louisiana Issues Neti Pot Warning After Two Fatal Infections
Dec. 16, 2011 - Fatal infections have been linked to Neti pot usage. A Neti pot, pictured, is a sinus-flushing device.
The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has issued a warning about improper Neti pot use, which has been linked to two deadly infections. A 51-year-old woman from DeSoto Parish and a 20-year-old man from St. Bernard Parish, a suburb of New Orleans, died after using Neti pots containing tap water to flush their sinuses. Both became infected with Naegleria fowleri, a parasite known as the brain-eating amoeba. "If you are irrigating, flushing or rinsing your sinuses, for example, by using a Neti pot, use distilled, sterile or previously boiled water to make up the irrigation solution," Louisiana State epidemiologist Dr. Raoult Ratard said in a statement. "Tap water is safe for drinking but not for irrigating your nose."

Naegleria fowleri enters the body through the nose to cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis -- a brain infection with symptoms similar to those of bacterial meningitis. Headache, fever, nausea and stiff neck swiftly give way to confusion, loss of balance, seizures and hallucinations. And if left untreated, the infection can cause death within one to 12 days. "The difficulty is that Naegleria is exceedingly rare," said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "It's difficult to diagnose, and once it's diagnosed, it's also difficult to treat." Most Naegleria fowleri infections result from diving into warm, stagnant water. There were four deaths linked to the parasite last summer, including one in Louisiana. "I had not heard of Naegleria being associated with Neti pot use, but it's perfectly biologically plausible, because tap water is not sterile," said Schaffner. "And when you inhale it directly into the sinuses, it's similar to a deep dive into brackish water." Drinking tap water cannot cause a Naegleria fowleri infection.

The Neti pot is an ancient nasal irrigation system that looks like a gravy boat. When used properly, it can help relieve congestion associated with the common cold, the flu and allergies. "Particularly in the winter, a lot of people get chronic sinusitis and the Neti pot offers a way for the sinuses to drain," said Schaffner. "Some patients seem to benefit; other don't." Neti pot popularity has grown in recent years, thanks to celebrity backers like Oprah and Dr. Oz. But a 2009 study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual meeting suggests that Neti pot overuse could increase the risk of sinus infections.

"There's a degree of controversy about whether it should be recommended generally," said Schaffner. "It's one of those treatments that sort of grew up rather than coming to us through rigorous, evidence-based trials. But there are many people out there who swear by it." The warning from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals highlights the risks of improper Neti pot use. But when used and cleaned properly, the Neti pot is safe, Schaffner said. Use sterile, boiled [and cooled] or distilled water; rinse [the Neti pot] out thoroughly after use; and air-dry it," he said, adding that water left in the Neti pot after use could become a breeding ground for bacteria and parasites that feed on mucus. "You don't have to send it to an autoclave, but it does require some attention to detail."

Source

WHAT?!

Isn't the rreal problem that the municiple water suppy is contaminated the REAL problem?

Blaming nedi pots is sort of silly.

No, because that pathogenesis of the amoeba requires water pressure against the cribiform plate of the nose. The amoebas are rare and hard to catch. You won't get the disease by drinking contaminated water or bathing it it. You have to induce a rush of water up your nose for them to get into your brain.

No one is saying Neti pots are to "blame" any more than needles are to blame for spreading HCV or HIV.
 

waltky

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Has fatality rate of more than 98%...
:eek:
Deadly brain-eating amoeba resurfaces in Karachi, Pakistan
Wed, Oct 10, 2012 - A brain-eating amoeba has killed at least 10 people in Pakistan’s most populous city since May, a WHO official said yesterday.
Naegleria fowleri has a fatality rate of more than 98 percent. It is transmitted when contaminated water enters the body through the nose and cannot be passed person-to-person. The 10 confirmed cases have all occurred in the southern port city of Karachi, said Musa Khan, head of the WHO’s Disease Early Warning System in Pakistan. It is unclear if all cases have been reported as residents may not be familiar with the disease and Pakistan’s hospitals are severely overstretched.

The amoeba travels from the nasal membranes to the brain. Symptoms are initially very mild, including a headache, stiff neck, fever and stomach pain. Death usually occurs five to seven days after infection. Authorities are planning a campaign to raise awareness among health workers and the public, Khan said. Most health centers had already been alerted, he said. “People should avoid getting water too deep into their nostrils and make sure their water supply is properly treated,” he said. “Those with symptoms should seek help immediately.”

Victims commonly catch it through swimming in infected water, but Khan said most of those who died did not have a history of swimming. Authorities were testing water from various parts of the city, he said. The disease first surfaced in Karachi, a city of 18 million people, in 2006. This year’s outbreak has been the first since then and the most recent deaths occurred last week. The US Centers for Disease Control said on its Web site that in the 10 years from 2002 to last year, 32 infections were reported in the US.

Deadly brain-eating amoeba resurfaces in Karachi, Pakistan - Taipei Times
 

waltky

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KALI HARDIG IS RECOVERING FROM INFECTION IN ARKANSAS...
:eek:
Brain-eating amoeba remains rare, and deadly
14 Aug.`13 > Brain-Eating Amoeba Victim Gives Doctors Thumbs Up
A 12-year-old Arkansas girl infected with a brain-eating amoeba is on the mend and may be only the third person known to have survived the baffling infection, doctors said Wednesday. She’s recovering just as a 12-year-old boy in Miami struggles for his life with the same infection. Doctors note the infection is still extremely rare – so rare that health officials don’t know how to track it or protect against it. They’re also not sure why Kali Hardig of Little Rock appears to be recovering, but federal health officials are relaying details about her treatment to the team treating Zachary Reyna in Miami.

The amoeba is called Naegleria fowleri, and it’s found in warm, fresh waters all over the world. It’s been seen in hot springs and swimming holes, freshwater lakes and even in neti pots used to clean out sinuses. It infects people through the nose, traveling up the nerve cells that carry smell signals into the brain. Doctors are not sure how or why a very few people are susceptible, but it’s clear that having water forced up into the sinuses, perhaps by dunking or diving, is an important factor.

6C8619151-130814-kali-harding-hmed-11a.blocks_desktop_medium.jpg

In this photo provided by the Hardig family Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, at Arkansas Children's Hospital in Little Rock, Ark., Kali Hardig, 12, poses in an undated family photo. The child suffers from a rare brain infection.

Kali became ill after swimming at a water park fed by spring water in Little Rock. Doctors at Arkansas Children’s Hospital tried the standard approach – a cocktail of four antibiotics – but also used an experimental antifungal drug and an unusual approach that involved lowering her body temperature. “Whether that had an impact on her care is hard to say,” Dr. Matt Linam, an infectious disease specialist at Arkansas Children’s, told NBC News. But after three weeks in the hospital, Kali is semi-conscious. “She hears when they ask a question and can shake her head yes or no and give a thumbs up,” hospital spokesman Tom Bonner said.

The infection caused by N. fowleri is called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis – PAM for short. It’s an inflammation of the brain and because an amoeba causes it, there’s not an easy treatment. The early symptoms look a lot like a cold or flu, so it can take a while to diagnose. Meanwhile, the amoeba is feeding on brain cells. Symptoms don’t usually begin until about a week after someone’s been in the water, so it is not always immediately clear what the cause might be. “PAM is difficult to detect because the disease progresses rapidly so that diagnosis is usually made after death,” the CDC says. Kali was lucky because she got treated fast, Linam says. Her mother knew something was badly wrong and got her to the hospital.

More Brain-eating amoeba remains rare, and deadly - NBC News.com
 

Kooshdakhaa

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Well, I think I'll just stay away from neti pots. And plunging into ponds and lakes.
 

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Boy, 12, Loses Battle With Brain-Eating Amoeba...
:(
Zachary Reyna, Florida Boy Fighting Brain-Eating Amoeba, To Be Taken Off Life Support
8/25/2013 > Zachary Reyna will be taken off life-support after days of no brain activity
The South Florida boy who has been battling a very rare infection at Miami Children's Hospital is brain dead and will be taken off life support Sunday night, according to his family. Zachary Reyna, 12, was knee-boarding in ditch water in Glades County when he contracted Naegleria fowleri, brain-eating amoeba, through his nose. Although antibiotics had successfully fought off the infection, Reyna suffered extensive brain damage. Although the family indicated that Reyna has already "passed" after showing negative brain activity for days, he will be kept on a ventilator until Sunday night so that his organs can be donated.

Saturday on Pray4Number4, the Facebook tribute for Reyna referencing the small number of primary amebic meningoencephalitis survivors, his father wrote: Although the family indicated that Reyna has already "passed" after showing negative brain activity for days, he will be kept on a ventilator until Sunday night so that his organs can be donated. Celebrities like Taylor Swift, reportedly Reyna's favorite singer, sent him gifts. The New York Yankees even sent him flowers and a balloon reading, "Get Well Soon." The infection that claimed the young boy's life is very rare.

Center For Disease Control officials say there have been only 128 people infected with PAM since 1962. Only three have survived, including another Florida 12 year old who recently contacted the amoeba from a freshwater spring. The CDC recommends diminishing risk by limiting water contact with nose (hold nose shut, use nose clips, or keep head above water), avoid water-related activities in warm freshwater during periods of high water temperatures and low water levels, and avoid stirring up bottom sediment in shallow, warm freshwater areas. There have also been cases from use of Neti pots, in which contaminated water is used to irrigate the nose.

Zachary Reyna, Florida Boy Fighting Brain-Eating Amoeba, To Be Taken Off Life Support (VIDEO)

See also:

Ark. girl battling rare brain infection able to speak, has 'half the world praying for her'
Aug 21, 2013 > Ark. girl fighting rare brain infection can speak
A 12-year-old Arkansas girl who has been battling a rare and often-fatal infection caused by a brain-eating amoeba is now able to say a few words. Kali Hardig was diagnosed last month with an infection caused by an amoeba called Naegleria fowleri. There were 128 such infections reported in the United States between 1962 and 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Before Kali, doctors could only point to one known survivor in the U.S. and another in Mexico.

So it's remarkable that Kali is alive, let alone able to say anything. "She's not speaking normal, but she is doing wonderful trying to pronounce stuff," Kali's mother, Traci Hardig, said Wednesday. "She can say `yes' and `no.'" She's also been able to say "Hi mama," "daddy" and "nanny." Health officials believe Kali got sick after a trip to a now-shuttered Arkansas water park that features a sandy-bottomed lake.

Naegleria fowleri (pronounced nuh-GLEER'-ee-uh FOW'-lur-ee) often is found in warm bodies of freshwater, such as lakes, rivers and hot springs. The amoeba typically enters the body through the nose as people are swimming or diving. It can then travel to the brain, causing a devastating infection called primary amebic meningoencephalitis, or PAM. That's what Kali has been battling. Initial symptoms usually start within one to seven days and may include headache, fever, nausea and vomiting. The disease progresses rapidly, and other symptoms can include stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, seizures and hallucinations.

Moreover, the infection destroys brain tissue and can cause brain swelling and death. Doctors say Kali's success is due in large part to experimental treatment and early detection and diagnosis. Traci Hardig brought Kali (pronounced KAY'-lee) to Arkansas Children's Hospital with a nasty fever on July 19. Doctors cooled Kali's body down to try to reduce the swelling, and they won clearance to treat her with a breast-cancer drug. Now, tests show no sign of the parasite in her system. "It's still a concern that she could certainly have some deficits long-term and not function entirely as she would have if this had never happened," one of her doctors, Dr. Vikki Stefans, said.

But, for now, Kali is making progress. "She's up and participating in all her therapy," Stefans said. "She's saying more, and things are basically looking good." Kali also is able to take a few steps with help at the hospital. "She'll walk across the room to her wheelchair," Traci Hardig said. "It's a real slow walk ... but we're really proud of her." Kali will likely stay at the hospital for at least a few more weeks, and she'll be dealing with therapy for months. But with support from her family and doctors, she's expected to do well. "She's got half the world praying for her, too, which can't hurt," Stefans said.

Ark. girl battling rare brain infection able to speak, has 'half the world praying for her' - 8/21/2013 5:40:41 PM | Newser
 

waltky

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Brain Eating Amoeba Found In Louisiana Drinking Supply...
:eek:
"Brain-eating" amoeba found in St. Bernard Parish water supply following death
September 13, 2013, The brain-eating amoeba Naegleria fowleri has officially been found in the St. Bernard Parish, La. water supply following last week's death of 4-year-old who got the lethal infection when playing on a slip 'n slide.
"The water is safe to drink and there are basic precautions that families can take -- such as chlorinating their pools and avoiding getting water in their noses -- to protect themselves, though infection from this amoeba is very rare," Louisiana state health officer Jimmy Guidry said in a press release. St. Bernard Parish is five miles from New Orleans.

CBS affiliate WWL in New Orleans reported last week the deceased child was from Mississippi and was visiting the area when he ingested the amoeba through his nose. Nasal ingestion is the only way the resulting infection, primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), can be caused. "They feel it was contracted in the with the slip 'n slide being out in the mud and the water for over a 12 or 14-hour period, in very hot conditions," St. Bernard Parish president David Peralta told WWL last Friday. At the time, he said the amoeba had only been found in a water tank in the toilet inside the home, and none was found in the parish's water supply.

That no longer appears to be the case, following additional testing from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC has now found the amoeba in four sites in the Violet and Arabi areas. These samples were taken from fire hydrants and faucets connected directly to water lines, the health department said. The parish had started chlorinating its water supply last week following the child's death, and officials said those efforts will continue given the latest testing. "We know that chlorine kills Naegleria fowleri, which is why it was critical that the parish proactively began flushing its water system with additional chlorine last week," said assistant secretary for public health J.T. Lane. "The parish will continue this action until it raises chlorine residuals to recommended levels, and this process will continue for several weeks."

Some water samples tested last week had showed low levels of chlorine. The St. Bernard Parish school system said Thursday that it 'cut off water' to public school fountains, WWL reported. The Naegleria fowleri amoeba is found in warm, fresh waters such as lakes, streams and canals that are up to 115 degrees Fahrenheit in temperature. It has to swim up the nose through the brain to cause PAM, so drinking water likely won't present a health risk. The infection is very rare: Of the 128 infections that occurred in the U.S. from 1962 and 2012, there was only one documented case of survival.

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