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Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom.

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Mindful

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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^ Why is it so damned boring to be stuck in a departure lounge while our flight is increasingly delayed? We are in a state of high arousal, anticipating our imminent arrival in a novel and stimulating environment. True, there are plenty of shops, screens and magazines around, but we’re not really interested in them and, by dividing our attention, they serve only to exacerbate our boredom. To make matters worse, the situation is out of our control, unpredictable (the flight could be further delayed, or even cancelled) and inescapable. As we check and re-check the monitor, we become painfully aware of all these factors and more. And so here we are, caught in transit, in a high state of arousal that we can neither engage nor escape.
 

harmonica

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..humans are animals.....dogs love to be ''aroused''/playtime/walk time ....dogs love company and hate to be alone

...humans love to watch TV/movies that arouse themselves-...they love to watch sports to arouse themselves.....etc etc

...humans don't '''need'' to keep busy to live.....they do it for a ''high'' like doing drugs/etc
 
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Mindful

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..humans are animals.....dogs love to be ''aroused''/playtime/walk time ....dogs love company and hate to be alone

...humans love to watch TV/movies that arouse themselves-...they love to watch sports to arouse themselves.....etc etc

...humans don't '''need'' to keep busy to live.....they do it for a ''high'' like doing drugs/etc
Can you sit for hours, just looking out of the window?
 

Tijn Von Ingersleben

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..humans are animals.....dogs love to be ''aroused''/playtime/walk time ....dogs love company and hate to be alone

...humans love to watch TV/movies that arouse themselves-...they love to watch sports to arouse themselves.....etc etc

...humans don't '''need'' to keep busy to live.....they do it for a ''high'' like doing drugs/etc
Can you sit for hours, just looking out of the window?
Depends what's out the window.
 
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Mindful

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..humans are animals.....dogs love to be ''aroused''/playtime/walk time ....dogs love company and hate to be alone

...humans love to watch TV/movies that arouse themselves-...they love to watch sports to arouse themselves.....etc etc

...humans don't '''need'' to keep busy to live.....they do it for a ''high'' like doing drugs/etc
Can you sit for hours, just looking out of the window?
Depends what's out the window.
That's the whole point. No control, or guarantees.
 

gipper

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
Lots. Everyday, when you're out and about.
 

MisterBeale

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
I believe what he means is. . . find something to do, anything, no matter what it is, do it well, and be the best you can be at it.


Do you like building pop-sickle art?



That is fine. But study pop-sickle art, and attain a mastery of pop-sickle artistry.

 
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Mindful

Mindful

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
I believe what he means is. . . find something to do, anything, no matter what it is, do it well, and be the best you can be at it.


Do you like building pop-sickle art?



That is fine. But study pop-sickle art, and attain a mastery of pop-sickle artistry.

The notion of it is to do nothing, be nothing. If you can stand it.
 

gipper

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
Lots. Everyday, when you're out and about.
Maybe I need to take up smoking weed. That should help me notice the little things and keep my mind occupied. LOL.
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
Lots. Everyday, when you're out and about.
Maybe I need to take up smoking weed. That should help me notice the little things and keep my mind occupied. LOL.
You're not supposed to keep your mind occupied. Maybe you should give up your car. Then you'd notice things. Sounds, smells.....
 

MisterBeale

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
I believe what he means is. . . find something to do, anything, no matter what it is, do it well, and be the best you can be at it.


Do you like building pop-sickle art?



That is fine. But study pop-sickle art, and attain a mastery of pop-sickle artistry.

The notion of it is to do nothing, be nothing. If you can stand it.
 
OP
Mindful

Mindful

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
I believe what he means is. . . find something to do, anything, no matter what it is, do it well, and be the best you can be at it.


Do you like building pop-sickle art?



That is fine. But study pop-sickle art, and attain a mastery of pop-sickle artistry.

The notion of it is to do nothing, be nothing. If you can stand it.
Funny. But; being bored and being boring are two separate issues.
 

MisterBeale

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What, exactly, is boredom? It is a deeply unpleasant state of unmet arousal: we are aroused rather than despondent, but, for one or more reasons, our arousal cannot be met or directed. These reasons can be internal – often a lack of imagination, motivation or concentration – or external, such as an absence of environmental stimuli or opportunities. We want to do something engaging, but find ourselves unable to do so and, more than that, are frustrated by the rising awareness of this inability.

Awareness, or consciousness, is key, and might explain why animals, if they do get bored, generally have higher thresholds for boredom. In the words of the British writer Colin Wilson: ‘most animals dislike boredom, but man is tormented by it’. In both man and animal, boredom is induced or exacerbated by a lack of control or freedom, which is why it is so common in children and adolescents, who, in addition to being chaperoned, lack the mind furnishings – the resources, experience and discipline – to mitigate their boredom.

Let’s look more closely at the anatomy of boredom:

Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom | Aeon Ideas
What do you make of this statement from the article you posted? I’m not sure what the author means. What are examples of little things?

In the words of the 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson: ‘It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.’
I believe what he means is. . . find something to do, anything, no matter what it is, do it well, and be the best you can be at it.


Do you like building pop-sickle art?



That is fine. But study pop-sickle art, and attain a mastery of pop-sickle artistry.

The notion of it is to do nothing, be nothing. If you can stand it.
Funny. But; being bored and being boring are two separate issues.
Prove it.
 
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