Alabama Latinos Stage Work Stoppage to Protest Immigration Law

Angelhair

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Numerous Latinos in Alabama skipped work or closed shops Wednesday in a show of protest against the state's new immigration law, the harshest in the nation.

The work stoppage was aimed at demonstrating the economic contribution of Alabama's Latino immigrants. It was unclear exactly how widespread the protests were, but a poultry company spokesman said officials were reporting unusually high absences at plants in northeast Alabama, where much of the state's chicken industry is based.

AL Official Lauds Exodus of MigrantsIn the northeast Alabama town of Albertville, numerous Hispanic-owned businesses along Main Street had the lights off and signs that said they wouldn't be open. Mexican restaurants, a bank that caters to Hispanics, small grocery stores and supermarkets were all shuttered.

José Contreras owns a restaurant and store on Main Street. He said he was losing about $2,500 in revenue by shutting down.

"We closed because we need to open the eyes of the people who are operating this state," said Contreras, originally from the Dominican Republic and a U.S. citizen. "It's an example of if the law pushes too much, what will happen."

Republican supporters say Alabama's strict new immigration law was intended to force undocumented workers out of jobs and help legal residents find work in a state suffering from high unemployment.

Read more: Alabama Latinos Stage Work Stoppage to Protest Immigration Law | Fox News Latino
 

waltky

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Granny says, "Now dey's gettin' uppity...
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Alabama Hispanics protest new law on immigration
Oct 12,`11 - At least a half-dozen poultry plants shut down or scaled back operations Wednesday and many other businesses closed as Hispanics in Alabama skipped work to protest the state's toughest-in-the-nation immigration law. The work stoppage was aimed at demonstrating the economic contribution of Alabama's Hispanic immigrants. It was unclear exactly how widespread the protests were, but a poultry company spokesman said officials were reporting unusually high absences at plants in northeast Alabama, where much of the state's chicken industry is based.
Along Main Street in this small Alabama town, the Mexican restaurant was closed, lights were out at a Hispanic-owned grocery store and even a bank catering to Spanish speakers was dark. Nearby, the usual hum of a chicken processing plant was silent. Businesses dependent on immigrant labor were shuttered Wednesday as workers took the day off to protest the state's strict new immigration law. The work stoppage appeared largest in northeast Alabama, the hub of the state's $2.7 billion poultry industry, but metropolitan areas were also affected. At least a half-dozen chicken processing plants closed or scaled back operations because employees, many of whom are Hispanic, didn't show up for work or told managers in advance they wanted to join the sick-out to show disapproval of the law upheld by a federal judge two weeks ago.

"We want the mayor, the governor, this judge to know we are part of the economy of Alabama," said Mexican immigrant Mireya Bonilla, who manages the supermarket La Orquidea, or "The Orchid," in Albertville. The town of about 19,000 people has one of the highest concentrations of Hispanics in the state. Out of 4.7 million people in Alabama, there are an estimated 185,000 Hispanics, most of them of Mexican origin. It wasn't clear exactly how many workers participated in the protest, but the parking lot was virtually empty at a Wayne Farms poultry plant, which employs about 850 people in Albertville. All along Main Street, Hispanic businesses were closed. Jose Contreras shut down his restaurant and store, a move he said cost him about $2,500.

"We closed because we need to open the eyes of the people who are operating this state," said Contreras, originally from the Dominican Republican and a U.S. citizen. "It's an example of if the law pushes too much what will happen." Since the law was upheld, many frightened Hispanics have hid in their homes or fled. Some construction workers, roofers and field hands have stopped showing up and schools have reported high absentee rates among Hispanic students. Officials said even more students were absent Wednesday, apparently because of the protest. The Obama administration has asked the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to at least temporarily block enforcement of the law, arguing in court documents Wednesday that the statute oversteps the state's authority and could lead to the discrimination of legal residents. The appeals court has not indicated when it may rule on the administration's request for a preliminary injunction.

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LilOlLady

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“AMERICA, ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES, Pitch in and help. This may hurt a little, but this too will pass.”
 

PLYMCO_PILGRIM

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Numerous Latinos in Alabama skipped work or closed shops Wednesday in a show of protest against the state's new immigration law, the harshest in the nation.

The work stoppage was aimed at demonstrating the economic contribution of Alabama's Latino immigrants. It was unclear exactly how widespread the protests were, but a poultry company spokesman said officials were reporting unusually high absences at plants in northeast Alabama, where much of the state's chicken industry is based.

AL Official Lauds Exodus of MigrantsIn the northeast Alabama town of Albertville, numerous Hispanic-owned businesses along Main Street had the lights off and signs that said they wouldn't be open. Mexican restaurants, a bank that caters to Hispanics, small grocery stores and supermarkets were all shuttered.

José Contreras owns a restaurant and store on Main Street. He said he was losing about $2,500 in revenue by shutting down.

"We closed because we need to open the eyes of the people who are operating this state," said Contreras, originally from the Dominican Republic and a U.S. citizen. "It's an example of if the law pushes too much, what will happen."

Republican supporters say Alabama's strict new immigration law was intended to force undocumented workers out of jobs and help legal residents find work in a state suffering from high unemployment.

Read more: Alabama Latinos Stage Work Stoppage to Protest Immigration Law | Fox News Latino

I'm not sure that is going to help them any with 9% unemployment and a crap economy. The non-latino shops will see an increase in business and the non-latino unemployed may actually end up snagging a few jobs if they do this for too long.
 

Tank

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But I bet there was no stoppage of Latinos commiting crime that day.
 

Katzndogz

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Numerous Latinos in Alabama skipped work or closed shops Wednesday in a show of protest against the state's new immigration law, the harshest in the nation.

The work stoppage was aimed at demonstrating the economic contribution of Alabama's Latino immigrants. It was unclear exactly how widespread the protests were, but a poultry company spokesman said officials were reporting unusually high absences at plants in northeast Alabama, where much of the state's chicken industry is based.

AL Official Lauds Exodus of MigrantsIn the northeast Alabama town of Albertville, numerous Hispanic-owned businesses along Main Street had the lights off and signs that said they wouldn't be open. Mexican restaurants, a bank that caters to Hispanics, small grocery stores and supermarkets were all shuttered.

José Contreras owns a restaurant and store on Main Street. He said he was losing about $2,500 in revenue by shutting down.

"We closed because we need to open the eyes of the people who are operating this state," said Contreras, originally from the Dominican Republic and a U.S. citizen. "It's an example of if the law pushes too much, what will happen."

Republican supporters say Alabama's strict new immigration law was intended to force undocumented workers out of jobs and help legal residents find work in a state suffering from high unemployment.

Read more: Alabama Latinos Stage Work Stoppage to Protest Immigration Law | Fox News Latino

I'm not sure that is going to help them any with 9% unemployment and a crap economy. The non-latino shops will see an increase in business and the non-latino unemployed may actually end up snagging a few jobs if they do this for too long.
That's pretty much the way it worked in California. A few work stoppages and some latino businesses couldn't survive.
 

High_Gravity

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Alot of the Mexican kids are staying home from school too to protest, and I am not kidding.
 

earlycuyler

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Numerous Latinos in Alabama skipped work or closed shops Wednesday in a show of protest against the state's new immigration law, the harshest in the nation.

The work stoppage was aimed at demonstrating the economic contribution of Alabama's Latino immigrants. It was unclear exactly how widespread the protests were, but a poultry company spokesman said officials were reporting unusually high absences at plants in northeast Alabama, where much of the state's chicken industry is based.

AL Official Lauds Exodus of MigrantsIn the northeast Alabama town of Albertville, numerous Hispanic-owned businesses along Main Street had the lights off and signs that said they wouldn't be open. Mexican restaurants, a bank that caters to Hispanics, small grocery stores and supermarkets were all shuttered.

José Contreras owns a restaurant and store on Main Street. He said he was losing about $2,500 in revenue by shutting down.

"We closed because we need to open the eyes of the people who are operating this state," said Contreras, originally from the Dominican Republic and a U.S. citizen. "It's an example of if the law pushes too much, what will happen."

Republican supporters say Alabama's strict new immigration law was intended to force undocumented workers out of jobs and help legal residents find work in a state suffering from high unemployment.

Read more: Alabama Latinos Stage Work Stoppage to Protest Immigration Law | Fox News Latino
outstanding. That should open some jobs up for citizens.
 

PLYMCO_PILGRIM

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Numerous Latinos in Alabama skipped work or closed shops Wednesday in a show of protest against the state's new immigration law, the harshest in the nation.

The work stoppage was aimed at demonstrating the economic contribution of Alabama's Latino immigrants. It was unclear exactly how widespread the protests were, but a poultry company spokesman said officials were reporting unusually high absences at plants in northeast Alabama, where much of the state's chicken industry is based.

AL Official Lauds Exodus of MigrantsIn the northeast Alabama town of Albertville, numerous Hispanic-owned businesses along Main Street had the lights off and signs that said they wouldn't be open. Mexican restaurants, a bank that caters to Hispanics, small grocery stores and supermarkets were all shuttered.

José Contreras owns a restaurant and store on Main Street. He said he was losing about $2,500 in revenue by shutting down.

"We closed because we need to open the eyes of the people who are operating this state," said Contreras, originally from the Dominican Republic and a U.S. citizen. "It's an example of if the law pushes too much, what will happen."

Republican supporters say Alabama's strict new immigration law was intended to force undocumented workers out of jobs and help legal residents find work in a state suffering from high unemployment.

Read more: Alabama Latinos Stage Work Stoppage to Protest Immigration Law | Fox News Latino

I'm not sure that is going to help them any with 9% unemployment and a crap economy. The non-latino shops will see an increase in business and the non-latino unemployed may actually end up snagging a few jobs if they do this for too long.
That's pretty much the way it worked in California. A few work stoppages and some latino businesses couldn't survive.
In a tough economy like this that makes total sense. You still have to pay the rent after all ;)
 

nitroz

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Let them protest. Don't change your stance.
They don't understand that this law targets ILLEGAL immigrants.

Being a citizen is a privilege when born outside of this country and you come in LEGALLY. Not a right.
 

High_Gravity

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How come people are making it look like Alabama is the bad guy here? these people are ILLEGAL immigrants, now freedom riders from the 1960s.
 

zonly1

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Let them protest because there's a lot of legal citizens out of work that pay the illegals welfare and education.
 

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