The Elites in Haiti and the coup the US did in 2004

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Penelope, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    A controversial figure, Jean-Bertrand Aristide is a former Catholic priest who was overthrown twice in Haiti’s turbulent political history. His first ouster was at the hands of Haiti’s former brutal military with the support of the traditional economic elite who live fabulously wealthy lives as compared to Haiti’s average citizens.

    Where Yannick Jean washes her clothes probably speaks more to Haiti’s current reality and the contradictions of the current United Nation’s mission than any expert on development possibly could. Rising above her and creating shadows over her dirty laundry is a huge edifice of new construction that bears the mark GB. It is a new building that covers several acres and is home to the business of Haiti’s wealthiest man, Gilbert Bigio.

    While the surrounding residents of Cite Soleil are forced to literally eat dirt to stave off hunger, Bigio is a billionaire whose family supported the first coup against Aristide and reportedly helped to back the movement that forced his second ouster in 2004.

    One need not look very far to see where Gilbert Bigio’s interests lie in relation to Cite Soleil. According to his own company’s web site his family maintains controlling interests in sixteen of Haiti’s largest companies. They are also the largest Haitian partner in the wireless communications giant Digicel, a mammoth company based in Ireland that has nearly cornered the cellular market in the Caribbean. Bigio’s family is not merely wealthy amidst a sea of poverty stricken residents in Haiti, his family represents the �ber-wealthy who have benefited most since Aristide’s second ouster in 2004.

    The Office of Foreign Assets Control of the US government blocked all of the Bigio family’s holdings in US banks following the brutal military coup against Aristide in 1991. Since Aristide’s second ousting in 2004, the financial wealth of the Bigio family along with those of other well off Haitian clans such as the Mevs, Brandts, Acras and Madsens have nearly doubled according to a confidential source at a private accounting firm.

    Not to be forgotten is the fact that Aristide’s forced departure in 2004 was legitimized and enforced by a UN authorized mission during the term of former Secretary General Kofi Annan. The fact that a few families of Haiti’s traditional elite continue to exact exorbitant profits, while residents of Cite Soleil are forced to eat mud pies and bathe in ditches, has shaken confidence in the non-governmental sector working with the poor in Haiti.

    Haiti’s wealthy prosper while the poor decline
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    In reading about Haiti, the wealthy and gov and military are corrupt, while in Jamaica crime (murder) is high as compared to Haiti. Its happening here and some are just too blind to see it.
     
  2. Disir
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    Disir Gold Member

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    The US helped overthrow him the first time. Helped install him the second time. So..........ya.
     

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