The Case For Aid to Catholic Schools

Discussion in 'Education' started by PoliticalChic, Feb 16, 2010.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    The majority of school-age children in private school attend parochial schools. Questions about the Constitutionality of government aid to parochial schools involve the Church-State intersection, and when the priority changed from ‘equity’ to the “child-benefit theory,” centering on achievement, the situation had to be revisited.

    Many Catholic schools were forced to close after the peak reached in the 1960’s:

    a. Many Catholic families joined the middle-class exodus from blighted communities, and few such schools were fund in the suburbs. “…middle-class Irish and Italian families started moving to the suburbs, leaving urban Catholic schools to cater to a majority of lower-income blacks and Hispanics.” Catholic Schools: How to Fix Parochial Schools' Decline - TIME

    b. Americans were migrating from the Northeast to western and southern states, which had no history of Catholic education.

    c. The liberalization of the Church after Vatican II dimmed the sense of obligation to educate their children in parochial school. And resulted in fewer entering religious vocations resulted in higher tuition. “In 1950, 90% of the teachers in Catholic schools came from religious orders; by 1967, the figure was 58%; today, it is 4%. This shift has meant that schools have had to raise tuition in order to pay more lay teachers. “Catholic Schools: How to Fix Parochial Schools' Decline - TIME

    d. The general revolt against authority in the culture begged the question of sending children to the most authoritarian and dogmatic educational milieu.
    In 1981, James Coleman published the first significant finding that Catholic schools were more effective at education. (James S. Coleman, "Public Schools, Private Schools, and the Public Interest," The Public Interest No. 64 (Summer 1981).

    Factors for and against:

    e. Many families favored the safety, discipline, and attention to character development in addition to academics, but would have to continue paying public school property taxes in addition to tuition.

    f. Teacher unions opposed any aid to schools that were not unionized.

    g. Urban parochial schools were serving a growing share of disadvantaged and frequently non-Catholic youngsters. In a study published in 1990, for example, the Rand Corporation found that, of the Catholic school students in these Catholic high schools in New York City, 75 to 90 percent were black or Hispanic. And the report highlighted:

    i. Over 66 percent of the Catholic school graduates received the New York State Regents diploma to signify completion of an academically demanding college preparatory curriculum, while only about 5 percent of the public school students received this distinction;
    ii. The Catholic high schools graduated 95 percent of their students each year, while the public schools graduated slightly more 50 percent of their senior class;
    iii. The Catholic school students achieved an average combined SAT score of 803, while the public school students' average combined SAT score was 642;
    iv. 60 percent of the Catholic school black students scored above the national average for black students on the SAT, and over 70 percent of public school black students scored below the same national average.
     More recent studies confirm these observations. Why Catholic Schools Spell Success For America's Inner-City Children

    Under the "child-benefit theory," government aid has been provided to the students of parochial schools, rather than to the schools themselves; by means of this compromise, the constitutional provision against aid to religious institutions is circumvented. In a number of cases, however, the U.S. Supreme Court has decided against state laws providing such aid to parochial schools, claiming that they violate the principle of separation between church and state. parochial school: Definition from Answers.com
     
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  2. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    I am hopeful this will happen in NJ. Our only Catholic High School is scheduled to close. Nearly every municipality in our county issued a resolution opposing the move. The mayors understand that without school choice, young families will choose to live elsewhere. Even those who have never considered Catholic school, still would like that option in the event that their children need an alternative for ANY reason. Go Schundler!
     
  3. Skull Pilot
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    Skull Pilot Platinum Member

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    School vouchers make sense. Why should a parent be forced to support a school his child does not attend?

    That said parents that home school should get the same tax credit.

    Another interesting point of discussion is how much should people with no children pay in tax dollars to support public schools. Certainly it should be something because we all benefit from an educated public ( we can argue if what the government does is education in another thread) but it should certainly be less than people with children pay. The more children people have the more they should pay should obviously as they are getting more from the system.
     
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  4. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Well apparently the catholic school is closing because of lack of demand....
     
  5. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    I am retired and single and paid well over 3k in school tax last year.
     
  6. Skull Pilot
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    Skull Pilot Platinum Member

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    And the couple with 6 kids paid less because of all the deductions they get for having all those rug rats.

    That doesn't sound fair to me.
     
  7. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    No it is not, and the first thing one needs to learn is life is not fair.
     
  8. Skull Pilot
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    Skull Pilot Platinum Member

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    But I thought people should pay their "fair share".

    Certainly the parents with a gaggle of kids fair share of school costs are much higher than yours.

    And we should probably use the words "equitable" and "proportional" instead of fair.
     
  9. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Only if you care about your property values. The more successful your local public schools, the more your home is worth.
     
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  10. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Yes should. And their sense of personal responsibility should make them do it voluntarially.
    Should...
    Should is not reality though.
    Relality and politics do not mix well.
     

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