Permissive Parenting and Missing Children?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Bonnie, Apr 15, 2005.

  1. Bonnie
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    Bonnie Senior Member

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    With all the young children being stolen from their parents, and not being a parent myself yet, I can't help but wonder do parents who let their kids roam all over the neighborhood unattended take some of the responsiblility in this?? Im not referring to kids who are taken from their homes, obviously.

    I understand one of the latest girls missing (presumed kidnapped) was 14 years old and had both her tongue and naval pierced.

    Are parents too permissive with their children these days, and if so why are they???
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Bonnie, you are mixing subjects in my opinion. Children are statistically 'stolen' no more often, from relatives or strangers, than in the 1950's. Today's difference is, actually since the 1980's, is media attention to the problem. The recovery rate is also similar.

    Are parents too permissive? Yes, for some, in the sense of wanting small children to appear more sophisticated than their years. It's dress, but also 'knowledge.' You have 2nd and 3rd graders that can explain sex and reproduction in a clinical sense, but are clueless to what emotions and repercussions are. (In dress and sex it's beyond the children's ability to synthesize, much less, relate.)

    So why do parents want this? I'm sure there are a multitude of reasons. Some would say to prepare their children, innoculating them. Some want their kids to be 'popular.' Some to feel the 'baby years' are behind them and they can get their lives back on track.

    Then you have the parents that are either 'so scared' of stranger danger or appearing unconcerned, that they never let their children just 'play' or make their own 'fun.' These kids are scedualed from morning to night, even into high school. Then the folks are shocked that their children are not able to make mature decisions on their own, when they've never been given the opportunity to make small mistakes.
     
  3. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    I'm afraid I'll fall into this category if I'm not careful, I want to shelter my daughter from everything. I''d never be an overscheduler though, I'm far to unorganized for that!
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Ah there is common sense to be had. Under 7 should always have eyes on them.

    7-9 Should be in shouting distance of responsible adult.

    10-12 Should be able to be able to be dropped off with a group of friends at a movie, restaurant, etc., and picked up by an adult. They should, if traffic/neighborhood permits, be able to walk/ride bikes with a friend to neighborhood shop, after being taught what to do if something/someone makes them uncomfortable.

    13-15 Pretty much the same as above, but with more time allowances.

    16 They are driving-good luck.
     
  5. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    I'm hoping to adjust as she grows, HOPING. :confused:
     
  6. Trinity
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    Trinity VIP Member

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    Uh Yeah maybe at the age of 20, if their lucky! :D
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I hear you. Then again, at 16 they are going to go to the mall with a friend or worse yet, alone. They think they are suddenly grown up? Doesn't work like that. Kids need to be able to have a chance safely, to make choices and mistakes. If the first time they are permitted to do so is when they leave for college :eek2: :fifty: The choices available might not be what you'd wish and their decisions either.
     
  8. Fmr jarhead
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    Fmr jarhead Senior Member

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    There is a movement afoot to not allow 16 year olds to drive...raise the legal age for driving to 18. Statistics bear out that those 2 years difference would save innumerable lives of our youth.
     
  9. Trinity
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    Trinity VIP Member

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    yeah I know, but I can wish can't I? :D
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Wishing is good! :thup:
     

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