CDZ One thing that surprised me about the Parkland shooting

Discussion in 'Clean Debate Zone' started by usmbguest5318, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. usmbguest5318
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    usmbguest5318 Gold Member

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    When I heard about the Parkland shooting, one of the things I heard was that some of the shooter's bullets found targets on the other sides of the building's interior walls. That surprised me because I very distinctly recall the walls at my one school I attended, my elementary school. The lower floors walls were cinder block and the upper ones were brick covered with plaster.

    I remember that because one of our classroom playtime activities was tossing balls -- generally tennis balls -- against the wall and playing dodgeball in the halls. Indeed, one could do all manners of things in one classroom and, but for a door being opened, nary a word was heard outside it. In PE class, the walls were used lots of times for all sorts of things.

    Of course, the walls at M. Stoneman Douglas are drywall rather than masonry, and I certainly don't know what material forms the interior walls at my or my kids' high schools. Having now thought about it, it's clear to me that I shouldn't be surprised that interior walls are drywall; it's certainly a less costly way to form a space divider. I guess it's just one of those things that hadn't struck me as having changed in school construction....not that before now I've spent any time actually pondering modern school building construction.

    Maybe, however, in light of the push to make schools safer, it's worth considering building schools from more durable materials than drywall?
     
  2. OldLady
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    OldLady Platinum Member

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    My elementary and high schools had cinder block walls, as well. Do you suppose it was because of fear we'd be bombed (my schools were built during the Cold War, as yours probably were)?
     
  3. Crixus
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    Crixus Gold Member

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    That’s one way you can tell older schools from newer ones. Where I work now old parts are block, new parts are drywall and steel frame. The also have a huge ass. Event room they hire the children into on some campuses. A hard room and permanent school district security would be TWO steps in the right direction.
     
  4. usmbguest5318
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    usmbguest5318 Gold Member

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    That thought crossed my mind. I didn't share it because the school's buildings predate nuclear weapons. I'm certain the school has renovated several times since it's founding, but I'm pretty sure they didn't alter the general classroom layout and buildings' interior structures. I recall my grandfather once told me about some shenanigans he and a couple of his classmates got into around the turn of the century and asked me if some markings they'd left in the basement of a dorm were still there. They were, so, I'm guessing not too much had changed between his time there and mine.

    Sadly, I didn't until now remember that conversation and my sons have all graduated. Perhaps that'll be something that I from my grandson might receive an update?
     

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