Kentucky Senate committee advances bill to teach Bible classes in public schools

Discussion in 'Education' started by uscitizen, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Kentucky Senate committee advances bill to teach Bible classes in public schools

    6:29 PM, Feb. 3, 2011
    Written by
    Associated Press
    FRANKFORT, Ky. — Public schools would be allowed to teach Bible classes under a bill making its way through the Kentucky legislature.

    The Senate Education Committee approved the measure on Thursday, sending it to the full Senate for consideration.
    A similar measure overwhelmingly passed in the Senate last year but died in the House.
    Under the Kentucky proposal, Bible courses would be offered as electives, meaning students could decide whether to take them.
    The legislation is Senate Bill 56


    Kentucky Senate committee advances bill to teach Bible classes in public schools | The Courier-Journal | courier-journal.com
     
  2. Coloradomtnman
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    Coloradomtnman Rational and proud of it.

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    this is a case where this is not that big of a deal in all reality - however using tax dollars to pay teachers to teach bible class is somehow very unAmerican. Churches have enough money and drive to teach anyone who wants to learn about the bible.
     
  3. Intense
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    Intense Senior Member

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    They Should Teach this First.


    Memorial and Remonstrance
    Against Religious Assessments

    James Madison

    [1785]




    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------








    To the Honorable the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia
    A Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments


    We the subscribers , citizens of the said Commonwealth, having taken into serious consideration, a Bill printed by order of the last Session of General Assembly, entitled "A Bill establishing a provision for Teachers of the Christian Religion," and conceiving that the same if finally armed with the sanctions of a law, will be a dangerous abuse of power, are bound as faithful members of a free State to remonstrate against it, and to declare the reasons by which we are determined. We remonstrate against the said Bill,
    Because we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, "that religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence." The Religion then of every man must be left to the conviction and conscience of every man; and it is the right of every man to exercise it as these may dictate. This right is in its nature an unalienable right. It is unalienable, because the opinions of men, depending only on the evidence contemplated by their own minds cannot follow the dictates of other men: It is unalienable also, because what is here a right towards men, is a duty towards the Creator. It is the duty of every man to render to the Creator such homage and such only as he believes to be acceptable to him. This duty is precedent, both in order of time and in degree of obligation, to the claims of Civil Society. Before any man can be considerd as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governour of the Universe: And if a member of Civil Society, do it with a saving of his allegiance to the Universal Sovereign. We maintain therefore that in matters of Religion, no man's right is abridged by the institution of Civil Society and that Religion is wholly exempt from its cognizance. True it is, that no other rule exists, by which any question which may divide a Society, can be ultimately determined, but the will of the majority; but it is also true that the majority may trespass on the rights of the minority.

    Because Religion be exempt from the authority of the Society at large, still less can it be subject to that of the Legislative Body. The latter are but the creatures and vicegerents of the former. Their jurisdiction is both derivative and limited: it is limited with regard to the co-ordinate departments, more necessarily is it limited with regard to the constituents. The preservation of a free Government requires not merely, that the metes and bounds which separate each department of power be invariably maintained; but more especially that neither of them be suffered to overleap the great Barrier which defends the rights of the people. The Rulers who are guilty of such an encroachment, exceed the commission from which they derive their authority, and are Tyrants. The People who submit to it are governed by laws made neither by themselves nor by an authority derived from them, and are slaves.......

    Religious Freedom Page: Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments, James Madison (1785)
     
  4. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Yep an unfunded mandate courtesy of the Republicans?
    And they are talking of cutting education funds.
     
  5. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Granny says, "Dat's right...

    ... is so' dey'll know `bout Jesus...

    ... an' dey won't get left behind...

    ... when the Rapture comes."
    :eusa_pray:
     
  6. blu
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    blu Senior Member

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    such stupidity. they should offer extra math & science electives instead.
     
  7. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    the problem with public schools is that they already have enough courses that teachers can't teach and students can't learn. I don't blame them for wanting a few more babysitting classes where everyone is happy give and receive 'free marks'.
     
  8. Madeline
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    Madeline BANNED

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    I would be willing to consider a federal law that makes it a civil tort for any state lawmaker to vote to pass a blatantly unconstitutional bill. I'm sure Kentucky voters did not elect these posers to play bullshit reindeer games.
     
  9. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    Why is it unconstitutional to have an elective subject offered in schools on a topic that many are interested in? surely the framers meant that religious institutions could not have a direct say in the running of govt, not that religion was a taboo subject.
     
  10. Madeline
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    Madeline BANNED

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    I'm tired, Ian. I think you ask a good question -- I was relying on my memory, and it may not be correct. I'll look at some SCOTUS opinions ASAP, I promise.

    Meanwhile, I still like my idea....do you?
     

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