First US Helps Her, Then She Helps China

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Annie, Nov 26, 2003.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Go figure: Activist Admits Sending China Technology

    Wednesday November 26, 2003 8:01 PM


    By CURT ANDERSON

    Associated Press Writer

    WASHINGTON (AP) - A human rights activist whom the U.S. government helped free from a Chinese prison in 2001 pleaded guilty Wednesday to illegally sending $1.5 million worth of high-tech items to China.

    Gao Zhan entered the plea in federal court in Alexandria, Va., to one count of unlawful export and another count of tax evasion. Her husband, Xue Donghua, also pleaded guilty to tax evasion.

    Gao, a permanent U.S. resident alien, was arrested by Chinese authorities in February 2001 and convicted of spying for Taiwan. She was released after five months in jail under intense pressure from the U.S. government and worked until spring 2002 as a researcher at American University here.

    According to federal prosecutors, from August 1998 through 2001 Gao ran Technology Business Services, a business specializing in exports of technology to China. The exports were made to Chinese companies tied to ``institutes'' which perform research and development for the Chinese government, including the Chinese military.

    Among the items sent to China were microprocessors that can be used in digital flight control and weapons systems, including identification of targets. Although these microprocessors also have commercial uses, they cannot be exported without permission of the U.S. government.

    Gao was paid $1.5 million by China for the microprocessors and other items, but prosecutors say she and her husband did not report most of the income on their tax returns.

    Gao faces a maximum of 37 months in prison, with her husband facing up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $100,000.

    Prosecutors say they will ask for a reduced sentence because Gao has been working with the U.S. government to identify people in the Chinese government who are seeking to import sensitive American goods.

    Gao was one of several Chinese-born academics, writers and entrepreneurs with ties to America who were detained in 2001 by China, contributing to tense U.S.-Chinese relations at the time.

    Her release was secured in part by direct intervention from President Bush in a phone call to Chinese President Jiang Zemin and came only a few days before Secretary of State Colin Powell was due to visit Beijing.

    U.S.-China relations also were strained in 2001 when a Navy spy plane collided with a Chinese fighter over the South China Sea and was forced to make an emergency landing. China finally released the plane to the U.S. after three months, enough time to possibly remove some sensitive equipment.







    Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
    Guardian China Story
     
  2. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    while I think she should spend the next 20 years in prison is anyone looking at this issue with china in a broader perspective?

    what are the odds that we'll be facing a crisis with china in the next 10 years?
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Looking worse, I posted earlier on another thread about China perhaps misreading US response regarding Taiwan due to committment to 'war on terror.' We can hope that somehow they recognize they better not mistake US for Britain via Hong Kong.

    No way do we want a show down, have gone along with 'one China' policy for years, but it's questionable what will happen if China insists on trying to 'unify.'
     

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