Don't Comment on Protected Groups Or Else!

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by red states rule, Feb 16, 2007.

  1. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    Now if Tim Hardaway would have said he hated Christians or Conservatives, he would have glowing press coverage.

    He made the mistake of talking about another protected group and the liberal media and PC Police go into attack mode


    Hardaway Banished for Anti-Gay Remarks
    By MELISSA MURPHY, AP Sports Writer

    The NBA banished Tim Hardaway from All-Star weekend in Las Vegas because of his anti-gay remarks. Hardaway, who played in five All-Star games during the 1990s, was already in Las Vegas to make a series of public appearances this week on behalf of the league. But after saying, "I hate gay people" during a radio interview, commissioner David Stern stepped in.

    "We removed him from representing us because we didn't think his comments were consistent with having anything to do with us," Stern told reporters Thursday at the opening of a fan festival at a Las Vegas casino, part of the NBA's All-Star weekend.

    Stern said he had not spoken with Hardaway, who left Las Vegas on Thursday, but he planned to do so.

    While Stern said a discussion about openly gay players could be part of future rookie orientation programs, he doesn't see a need to address the league.

    "This is an issue overall that has fascinated America. It's not an NBA issue," Stern said, pointing to the ongoing debate over gay marriage at the state and federal levels.

    "This is a country that needs to talk about this issue," he said. "And, not surprisingly, they use sports as a catalyst to begin the dialogue."

    Hardaway apologized for his comments, which came a week after John Amaechi became the first former NBA player to say he was gay.

    "As an African-American, I know all too well the negative thoughts and feelings hatred and bigotry cause," Hardaway said Thursday in a statement issued by his agent. "I regret and apologize for the statements that I made that have certainly caused the same kinds of feelings and reactions.

    "I especially apologize to my fans, friends and family in Miami and Chicago. I am committed to examining my feelings and will recognize, appreciate and respect the differences among people in our society," he said. "I regret any embarrassment I have caused the league on the eve of one of their greatest annual events."

    The NBA brings in many former players to take part in various All-Star events. Hardaway had already represented the league in Las Vegas earlier this week at a Habitat for Humanity event and a fitness promotion. The former U.S. Olympian was also scheduled to be an assistant coach at a wheelchair game Thursday night and later appear at the fan-oriented Jam Session until Stern told him he was no longer welcome.

    "His views are not consistent with ours," Stern said.

    Amaechi, who spent five seasons with four teams, came out last week in advance of the release of his autobiography, "Man in the Middle." He is the sixth professional male athlete from one of the four major U.S. sports _ basketball, baseball, football, hockey _ to openly discuss his homosexuality.

    Though Stern said last week a player's sexuality wasn't important, Hardaway disagreed Wednesday on a Miami radio show.

    "First of all, I wouldn't want him on my team," the former Miami Heat star said. "And second of all, if he was on my team, I would, you know, really distance myself from him because, uh, I don't think that is right. I don't think he should be in the locker room while we are in the locker room."

    When show host Dan Le Batard told Hardaway those comments were "flatly homophobic" and "bigotry," the player continued.

    "You know, I hate gay people, so I let it be known. I don't like gay people and I don't like to be around gay people," he said. "I'm homophobic. I don't like it. It shouldn't be in the world or in the United States."

    Hardaway also said if he did find out that a teammate was gay, he would ask for the player to be removed from the team.

    Hardaway apologized later Wednesday night in a telephone interview with WSVN-TV in Miami, but the furor over his remarks continued Thursday.

    "I don't need Tim's comments to realize there's a problem," Amaechi told The Associated Press in a phone interview Thursday. "People said that I should just shut up and go away _ now they have to rethink that."

    Two major gay and lesbian groups denounced Hardaway's remarks.

    "Hardaway's comments are vile, repulsive, and indicative of the climate of ignorance, hostility and prejudice that continues to pervade sports culture," said Neil Giuliano, president of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. "And by apologizing not for his bigotry, but rather for giving voice to it, he's reminding us that this ugly display is only the tip of a very large iceberg."

    Said Matt Foreman, president of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force: "Hardaway is a hero to thousands of young people. And that's what makes his comments so troubling. Sadly, his words simply put the pervasive homophobia in the NBA on the table."

    Amaechi, who detailed his life in "Man in the Middle," hoped his coming out would be a catalyst for intelligent discourse.

    "His words pollute the atmosphere," Amaechi said. "It creates an atmosphere that allows young gays and lesbians to be harassed in school, creates an atmosphere where in 33 states you can lose your job, and where anti-gay and lesbian issues are used for political gain. It's an atmosphere that hurts all of us, not just gay people."

    Amaechi taped a spot Thursday for PBS' gay and lesbian program "In the Life." He said the anti-gay sentiment remains despite Hardaway's apology.

    "It's vitriolic, and may be exactly what he feels," he said. "Whether he's honest or not doesn't inoculate us from his words. It's not progress to hear hateful words."

    http://www.comcast.net/sports/index.jsp?cat=SPORTS&fn=/2007/02/15/588374.html&cvqh=tis_hardaway
     
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  2. Kagom
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    Kagom Senior Member

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    He apologized for his comment. Let 'im play I say.
     
  3. Gurdari
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    Gurdari Egaliterra

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    It is his right to hate anyone, but a political affiliation is not the same as sexual orientation. Did Tim Hardaway CHOOSE to be straight? I'll bet most Republicans chose to vote that way, they weren't born with an internal urge to lower taxes.
     
  4. Emmett
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    Emmett Active Member

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    What?
     
  5. Emmett
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    Emmett Active Member

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    Well buddy, you have pissed off the masses haven't you! That will teach you! You see Tim, here in America it isn't politically correct to state your true feelings. See, that isn't ........well............allowed.

    Tim, the term "free speech" is just a term. It dosen't really mean you can say whatever you want in public, ...................well.....................unless you are a member of the press. What I'm trying to say Tim is that your just a soveriegn citizen of the United States of America. That really isn't such a big deal anymore since the beginning of our recent transition to socialism which has been underway for quite some time now. You see, soon, the press and government will be almost one. It isn't savy to hate the lifestyle of fags and lesbians. You see, the law basically says we have to allow this behavior to influence our children, be taught in our third grade classes and accepted as "normal" behavior even though a couple of people here in the US still "hate" it.

    Yeah, you better be careful bud, that kind of talk could get you into some serious trouble here in America. So calm down man, it's all good! I mean, hell, you can still publicly hate the president of the United States of America in public. Hell, blame him. Everything else is his fault. You might even get quoted again by the NYT in a positive light next time.

    Your Pal,

    Emmett
     
  6. Bry
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    Bry Member

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    I don't really think this is an issue of free speech. Noone is questioning Tim's right to say what he said. Noone is considering throwing him in jail. IMHO, the NBA made the right decision to distance itself from Tim's comments,and most organizations, especially those whose economic interests could be affected, would do the same.

    Also, there is a qualitative difference between expressing hatred for an entire demographic and expressing hatred for an individual like the president, though the NBA probably wouldn't have been too happy about Tim's comments going that direction either.

    It's anyone's right to do it, but it just isn't smart to express such strong opinions when you are representing an organization that draws from all segments of the society, and Tim should hardly be surprised by the consequences.
     
  7. Emmett
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    Emmett Active Member

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    Howard Dean direct quote, "I HATE Republicans! Did the Democratic party chastize him for that?
     
  8. Bry
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    Bry Member

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    Did Howard say that? oh dear... not very appropriate hmmm?

    Dean is involved in politics, and a bit of that kind of thing is to be expected (and is taken as much as it is given, I believe...) An analogous situation would be Tim Hardaway saying "I hate the Chicago Bulls, or the Pacific Conference" or something similar.


    What if Tim had said he hated all Christians? I honestly believe the end result would have been identical. I get your frustration with PC, believe me. But this doesn't seem to me to be an extreme case of PC.

    Cheers!
     
  9. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Agreed. Just a case of stupidity on display. Cheers!
     
  10. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Hey tim can have any opinion he wants. But just like the Dixie Chicks, don't expect your employer to stand by you if its going to cost them business. NBA made their choice very quickly.

    What annoys me is the half assed apologies people give after making these statements. Kramer, Mel Gibson, and now Hardaway all spoke their minds and then later backed down to PC pressure in order to save their wallets. Speak your mind and stand by it. You're already screwed once you said it so you might as well own up to it.
     
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